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Frishammar, Johan
Publications (10 of 21) Show all publications
Gama, F., Frishammar, J. & Parida, V. (2019). Idea generation and open innovation in SMEs: When does market‐based collaboration pay off most?. Creativity and Innovation Management, 28(1), 113-123
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Idea generation and open innovation in SMEs: When does market‐based collaboration pay off most?
2019 (English)In: Creativity and Innovation Management, ISSN 0963-1690, E-ISSN 1467-8691, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 113-123Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Small‐ and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs) largely depend on proficient idea generation activities to improve their front‐end innovation performance, yet the liabilities of newness and smallness often hamper SMEs' ability to benefit from systematic idea generation. To compensate for these liabilities, many SMEs adopt an open innovation approach by collaborating with market‐based partners such as customers and suppliers. This study investigates the relationship between SMEs' systematic idea generation and front‐end performance and investigates the moderating role of market‐based partnership for SMEs. Drawing on a survey of 146 Swedish manufacturing SMEs, this study provides two key contributions. First, the systematic idea generation and front‐end performance relationship in SMEs is non‐linear. Accordingly, higher levels of front-end performance are achieved when idea generation activities are highly systematic. Second, the returns from higher levels of systematic idea generation are positively moderated by market‐based partnerships. Thus, external cooperation with customers and suppliers pays off most toward front‐end performance when SMEs have highly systematic idea generation processes. These results indicate a contingency perspective on the role of external partnerships. They also have implications for research into the front‐end of innovation and open innovation in the context of SMEs. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell, 2019
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-38167 (URN)10.1111/caim.12274 (DOI)2-s2.0-85052629435 (Scopus ID)
Funder
VINNOVA
Note

Funding: CAPES & VINNOVA

Available from: 2018-10-16 Created: 2018-10-16 Last updated: 2019-02-28Bibliographically approved
Gama, F., Sjödin, D. & Frishammar, J. (2017). Managing interorganizational technology development: Project management practices for market‐ and science‐based partnerships. Paper presented at 16th International CINET Conference16th International CINET Conference, Pursuing Innovation Leadership, 13-15 September, 2015, Stockholm, SWEDEN. Creativity and Innovation Management, 26(2), 115-127
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Managing interorganizational technology development: Project management practices for market‐ and science‐based partnerships
2017 (English)In: Creativity and Innovation Management, ISSN 0963-1690, E-ISSN 1467-8691, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 115-127Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Firms are increasingly relying on collaborating with external partners to drive technology development. Many firms struggle with managing the inherently uncertain and ambiguous technology development process, especially with external actors involved, because they may not have or share the same project management practices concerning coordination and control activities. To address this gap, this study examines appropriate project management practices for market-based and science‐based partnerships in three large technology‐intensive firms. Our results suggest that interorganizational technology development is problematic because firms lack sufficient partner understanding and struggle with aligning their project management practices with those of their partners. To address these problems, we identify project management practices of coordination and control to fit the contingencies of each type of partner collaboration. Our results provide implications for theory and managerial practices related to managing interorganizational technology development. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell, 2017
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-38166 (URN)10.1111/caim.12207 (DOI)000404288900002 ()2-s2.0-85019114880 (Scopus ID)
Conference
16th International CINET Conference16th International CINET Conference, Pursuing Innovation Leadership, 13-15 September, 2015, Stockholm, SWEDEN
Funder
Ragnar Söderbergs stiftelse
Note

Funding Agency: Brazilian government 

Available from: 2018-10-16 Created: 2018-10-16 Last updated: 2018-11-22Bibliographically approved
Gama, F., Frishammar, J. & Parida, V. (2016). Idea Generation in SMEs: when does market-based partnership pay off most?. In: : . Paper presented at 17th International CINet Conference: Innovation and tradition: combining the old and the new, Turin, Italy, 11-13 September, 2016.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Idea Generation in SMEs: when does market-based partnership pay off most?
2016 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) strongly depend on idea generation to improve the front-end of innovation performance, yet internal resource and capability limitations may hamper successful idea generation in SMEs. Therefore, many SMEs may choose to collaborate with market-based partners such as customers and suppliers to compensate for lack of internal resources. We ask when and under which circumstances does such collaboration provides’ highest benefit towards front-end innovation performance? By drawing on a survey of 142 Swedish manufacturing SMEs, this paper provides two key findings. First, systematic idea generation and front-end performance relationships is non-linear, such that disproportionally higher levels of performance are achieved when idea generation is highly systematic. Second, the pay-off from high level of idea generation is largely influenced by presence of market-based partners. Thus, our findings show that external collaboration in idea generation does not pay off unless SMEs have internal systematic processes for idea generation in place before external input is sought. This implies a contingency perspective on external collaboration and provides implications for research into the front-end of innovation and open innovation, in addition to novel managerial implications about how to better involve partners in idea generation and selection.

Keywords
SMEs, idea generation
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-38387 (URN)
Conference
17th International CINet Conference: Innovation and tradition: combining the old and the new, Turin, Italy, 11-13 September, 2016
Available from: 2018-11-20 Created: 2018-11-20 Last updated: 2019-01-11Bibliographically approved
Gama, F., Sjödin, D. & Frishammar, J. (2015). Managing Open Technology Development: Adapting Stage-Gate Processes to Partner Types. In: : . Paper presented at 16th International CINet Conference: Pursuing Innovation Leadership, Stockholm, Sweden, 13-15 September, 2015.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Managing Open Technology Development: Adapting Stage-Gate Processes to Partner Types
2015 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Firms are increasingly reliant on collaborating with external partners to drive their technology development efforts in light of increasing pace of development and global competition. However, many firms struggle with managing the inherently uncertain and ambiguous process of technology development with external actors because these may not share the same technological understandings, processes and goals. Accordingly, we argue that further research is required to better understand the management of joint projects with different types of partners within technology development. To fill this gap this study examines the adaptation of traditional stage-gate processes for technology development projects with science-based and market-based partners in three large technologies oriented firms. Our results shows that open technology development projects are often problematic because firms lack partner understanding and have difficulty aligning their development processes with external partners. To address these problems we found that our firms adapted their processes by implementing externally oriented stages, gates and roles to suit the contingencies of collaboration with science-based and market-based partners respectively. Our results provide implications for theory and management practice concerning the management of open innovation and stage-gate processes.

Keywords
Open technology development, pen innovation, technology development, science-based partners, market-based partners, stage-gate
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-38385 (URN)
Conference
16th International CINet Conference: Pursuing Innovation Leadership, Stockholm, Sweden, 13-15 September, 2015
Available from: 2018-11-20 Created: 2018-11-20 Last updated: 2019-01-11Bibliographically approved
Florén, H. & Frishammar, J. (2013). Research Note: What is the ‘fuzzy front end’, why is it important, and how can it be managed? (5ed.). In: Joe Tidd & John Bessant (Ed.), Managing Innovation: Integrating Technological, Market and Organisational Change (pp. 418-420). Chichester: John Wiley & Sons
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Research Note: What is the ‘fuzzy front end’, why is it important, and how can it be managed?
2013 (English)In: Managing Innovation: Integrating Technological, Market and Organisational Change / [ed] Joe Tidd & John Bessant, Chichester: John Wiley & Sons, 2013, 5, p. 418-420Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Chichester: John Wiley & Sons, 2013 Edition: 5
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-36311 (URN)978-1-118-36063-7 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-02-16 Created: 2018-02-16 Last updated: 2018-02-20Bibliographically approved
Florén, H. & Frishammar, J. (2012). From Preliminary Ideas to Corroborated Product Definitions: Managing the Front End of New Product Development. California Management Review, 54(4), 20-43
Open this publication in new window or tab >>From Preliminary Ideas to Corroborated Product Definitions: Managing the Front End of New Product Development
2012 (English)In: California Management Review, ISSN 0008-1256, E-ISSN 2162-8564, Vol. 54, no 4, p. 20-43Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Front-end activities largely influence the outcomes of new product development processes, because it is here that firms create new ideas, give them direction, and set them in motion. We show that the front end can be understood as comprising three core activities: idea/concept development, idea/concept alignment, and idea/concept legitimization, which allow firms to create corroborated product definitions. The paper provides important implications for managers interested in front-end management, and devote specific attention to the differences between incremental and radical front end development and to the front end in the light of increasingly open innovation processes. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Berkeley, Calif.: University of California Press, 2012
Keywords
Innovation management, Front end, Ideation, New product development, Open innovation, Opportunity recognition)
National Category
Business Administration Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-19399 (URN)10.1525/cmr.2012.54.4.20 (DOI)000209469900002 ()2-s2.0-84866384763 (Scopus ID)
Funder
VINNOVA
Available from: 2012-08-31 Created: 2012-08-31 Last updated: 2018-03-22Bibliographically approved
Frishammar, J., Lichtenthaler, U. & Rundquist, J. (2012). Identifying technology commercialization opportunities: the importance of integrating product development knowledge. The Journal of product innovation management, 29(4), 573-589
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Identifying technology commercialization opportunities: the importance of integrating product development knowledge
2012 (English)In: The Journal of product innovation management, ISSN 0737-6782, E-ISSN 1540-5885, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 573-589Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

New product development (NPD) is a knowledge-intensive activity, perhaps even more so in recent years given the shift toward more open innovation processes, which involve active inward and outward technology transfer. While the extant literature has established that knowledge is critical for NPD performance, knowledge generated through NPD can have an additional impact on external technology exploitationas when firms go beyond pure internal application of knowledge to commercialize their technologies, for example, by means of technology outlicensing. Grounded in the knowledge-based view of the firm, this paper examines how the integration of domain-specific knowledge, procedural knowledge, and general knowledge generated through NPD affects a firm's proficiency in identifying technology commercialization opportunities. Additionally, analysis of how technology opportunity identification relates to technology commercialization performance is provided. Empirically, the paper draws on survey data from 193 Swedish medium-sized manufacturing firms in four industries active with NPD, and regression analyses and structural equation modeling were used to test the hypotheses. The results highlight the importance of integrating domain-specific and general NPD knowledge to proficiently identify technology licensing opportunities. The empirical findings also provide strong support for a subsequent link between technology opportunity identification and technology commercialization performance. Altogether, these results point to strong and previously unexplored complementarities between inward and outward technology exploitation, that is, between NPD and technology licensing. As such, the results provide important theoretical implications for research into the fields of knowledge integration, technology exploitation, opportunity identification, and technology markets. Moreover, the results have significant managerial implications concerning how knowledge generated through NPD can help firms to achieve both strategic and monetary benefits when trying to profit from technology. In particular, to set up proficient technology commercialization processes, it appears beneficial for firms to integrate knowledge that is gained through the ordinary activities of developing and commercializing products. Specifically, the integration of domain-specific knowledge and general knowledge helps firms to match their technologies with new applications and markets, which is often the critical barrier to successful technology commercialization activities. Managers are thus encouraged to integrate domain-specific knowledge and general knowledge from NPD to reap additional benefits in profiting from investments in innovation and technology.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York, N.Y.: Wiley-Blackwell, 2012
Keywords
research-and-development, fuzzy front-end, open innovation, development performance, absorptive-capacity, interdepartmental integration, dynamic capabilities, manufacturing firms, market orientation, managing knowledge
National Category
Economics and Business
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-13981 (URN)10.1111/j.1540-5885.2012.00926.x (DOI)000304903200006 ()2-s2.0-84860523260 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2010-12-09 Created: 2010-12-09 Last updated: 2018-03-23Bibliographically approved
Frishammar, J., Florén, H. & Wincent, J. (2011). Beyond Managing Uncertainty: Insights from Studying Equivocality in the Fuzzy Front-End of Product and Process Innovation Projects. IEEE transactions on engineering management, 58(3), 551-563
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Beyond Managing Uncertainty: Insights from Studying Equivocality in the Fuzzy Front-End of Product and Process Innovation Projects
2011 (English)In: IEEE transactions on engineering management, ISSN 0018-9391, E-ISSN 1558-0040, Vol. 58, no 3, p. 551-563Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Previous research has shown uncertainty reduction to be critical in the fuzzy front end of the innovation process, but little attention has been given to the equally important concept of equivocality, although it is a defining characteristic of many front-end projects. To address this research gap, this paper report the resultsfrom a longitudinal, multiple case study of four large companiesoriented to both product and process innovation. First, our results show that both uncertainty and equivocality is more effectively reduced in successful front-end projects than in unsuccessful ones. Second, the negative consequences of equivocality appear more critical to front-end performance than the consequences following uncertainty. Third, our results show that uncertainty and equivocality are reduced sequentially in successful projects and simultaneously in unsuccessful projects. Finally, uncertainty and equivocality takes longer time to reduce in process innovation projects than in product innovation projects, which is a consequence of the systemic nature of process innovation. Altogether, these findings provide strong implications for managing front-end projects more proficiently.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York, N.Y.: IEEE Press, 2011
Keywords
Equivocality, fuzzy front end, predevelopment, process innovation, product innovation, uncertainty
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-15359 (URN)10.1109/TEM.2010.2095017 (DOI)000293707100012 ()2-s2.0-79960719820 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2011-06-13 Created: 2011-06-13 Last updated: 2018-03-22Bibliographically approved
Rundquist, J., Tell, F. & Frishammar, J. (2011). The Effects of Knowledge Integration on New Product Development Performance. In: School of Business, NFF 2011 August 20-24. Paper presented at 21st NFF conference. Stockholm University School of Business, August 20-24, 2011 (pp. 132-132). Stockholm: Stockholm University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Effects of Knowledge Integration on New Product Development Performance
2011 (English)In: School of Business, NFF 2011 August 20-24, Stockholm: Stockholm University, 2011, p. 132-132Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The knowledge needed for development of new products is becoming increasingly complex and distributed. There is a need for firms to develop their capabilities for knowledge integration. Although prior knowledge-based literature has pointed to the importance of knowledge integration for competitive advantage, our understanding of how the integration of different types of knowledge affects new product development (NPD) performance is still limited. We quantitatively examine the effect of the integration of different types of knowledge on performance in NPD. Knowledge integration refers to the process of combining specialized but complementary knowledge. In this article we seek to study the effects of knowledge integration on NPD performance. Previous studies point to the positive effects of knowledge integration on NPD performance, but they do not distinguish between different types of knowledge in examining these effects. This article therefore seeks to contribute to this emerging literature by explicitly studying the integration of different types of knowledge and the effects that such integration have on NPD performance. We draw upon a classification of knowledge suggested by Ullman (1997) in discussing what types of knowledge that is particularly pertinent in engineering practices. That is, what knowledge engineers draw upon in conducting design and development work. We address the types of domain-specific knowledge, procedural knowledge, and general knowledge integration. Three hypotheses suggesting that the capabilities for integration of each type of knowledge respectively affect NPD performance positively are tested. A fourth hypothesis suggests that there are complementarity effects between integration of the three types of knowledge upon NPD performance. Data was collected during 2009 from a sampling frame of 355 medium-sized Swedish manufacturing firms in four industries. We received 193 valid answers, i.e. a 54% response rate) Hypotheses were tested with standard OLS regression together with EFA and CFA analysis. The results provide support for the first three hypotheses, while the fourth one was rejected. This implies that capabilities to integrate domain-specific, procedural and general knowledge are all independently affecting NPD performance positively, but no combined effect above and beyond the individual variables. This indicates that one knowledge type can be integrated without an absolute need to integrate two types or all three types.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Stockholm University, 2011
Keywords
Capabilities, Knowledge complementarity, Knowledge differentiation, Knowledge integration, Knowledge types, New Product Development, Quantitative analysis
National Category
Other Mechanical Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-15739 (URN)
Conference
21st NFF conference. Stockholm University School of Business, August 20-24, 2011
Available from: 2011-07-01 Created: 2011-07-01 Last updated: 2018-03-22Bibliographically approved
Frishammar, J., Florén, H. & Joakim, W. (2009). Patterns of Uncertainty and Equivocality during Predevelopment: Findings from Process‐Based Firms. In: Proceedings of the 18th International Conference on Management of Technology. Paper presented at 18th International Conference on Management of Technology, 5-9 April, Orlando, Florida, USA (pp. 14).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patterns of Uncertainty and Equivocality during Predevelopment: Findings from Process‐Based Firms
2009 (English)In: Proceedings of the 18th International Conference on Management of Technology, 2009, p. 14-Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Previous literature suggests that innovation managers should prioritize uncertainty reduction in early phases of innovation projects. When uncertainty is high, the general prediction is negative consequences in the form of time‐delays, waste of resources, unclear team vision and, ultimately, concept failure. There are strong reasons to believe, however, that simultaneous management of equivocality is equally important, but this concept has largely been neglected in previous research. By means of a case‐study relying upon exploratory interviews addressing unique observations of 58 innovation projects, we notice that the perhaps most significant challenge for being successful or not is not the initial levels of uncertainty. Rather, it is managerial attempts to actively fight for reducing uncertainty but also addressing the equivocality dimension in the pre‐development stages of the innovation process. We observe reduced patterns of uncertainty and equivocality in successful product innovation and process innovation projects in pre‐development stages. This was not the case for unsuccessful projects. Similarly, we find significantly lower levels of equivocality for successful projects, which is a contribution to prior research suggesting that uncertainty is the major concern during predevelopment. Moreover, our results show that perceived patterns of uncertainty and equivocality differ between product innovation and process innovation projects in different sub‐phases of pre‐development. Key results are summarized as propositions which not only provide guidance for future research, but also provide direct managerial implications on how to address uncertainty and equivocality in different sub‐phases of predevelopment.

Keywords
predevelopment, innovation, fuzzy front end, product development
National Category
Economics and Business
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-2985 (URN)2082/3388 (Local ID)2082/3388 (Archive number)2082/3388 (OAI)
Conference
18th International Conference on Management of Technology, 5-9 April, Orlando, Florida, USA
Available from: 2009-09-21 Created: 2009-09-21 Last updated: 2018-03-23Bibliographically approved
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