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Widén, Kristian, Associate Professor
Publications (10 of 10) Show all publications
Rose, T., Manley, K. & Widén, K. (2019). Do firm-level barriers to construction product innovation adoption vary according to position in the supply chain?. Construction Innovation, 19(2), 212-235
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Do firm-level barriers to construction product innovation adoption vary according to position in the supply chain?
2019 (English)In: Construction Innovation, ISSN 1471-4175, E-ISSN 1477-0857, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 212-235Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine product innovation as a means of addressing infrastructure shortages in developed economies and to improve the sustainability of infrastructure. The obstacles to product innovation in the road industry are compared between different types of participants in the supply chain to provide guidelines for interventions to improve innovation rates.

Design/methodology/approach

This exploratory study uses descriptive data from a large scale survey of the Australian road industry. The three top-rated product innovation obstacles for the following four types of participants are examined: contractors, consultants, suppliers and clients.

Findings

The four groups were found to disagree about the relative importance of the obstacles. Contractors and suppliers ranked “restrictive price-only tender assessment” used by clients as their number one obstacle, while consultants thought there was too much emphasis by the clients on direct costs compared with whole-of-life costs. On the other hand, clients felt suppliers do not do enough thorough testing prior to proposing a new product and disagreed with suppliers about who should carry the risk of new product failure.

Research limitations/implications

The conceptual framework was found to yield novel insights with significant policy implications. The construction-specific contextual determinants that were integrated by the authors into a broad innovation diffusion process proved useful in categorising road product innovation obstacles across the four surveyed supply chain groups – without overlap or omission. The new framework also proved useful in ordering the key obstacles across groups for interpretation and discussion. In disaggregating product obstacles according to groups, these contextual determinants were proven to be mutually exclusive and to represent important focal points in promoting the uptake of product innovation in construction. Although the current study has usefully provided quantitative data concerning construction innovation obstacles, there are limitations due to its reliance on descriptive statistics. Future work by the authors is proposed to analyse the relationships between innovation obstacles and supply chain partners using inferential statistics to further develop and validate these early findings. The current study is an interim step in this work and an important contribution in identifying and addressing firm-level barriers seen to be constraining construction product innovation.

Practical implications

Results suggest there is a need for government clients to carefully consider the differing perspectives across the supply chain when developing strategies to encourage the adoption of mutually-beneficial innovative products on their construction projects. Inclusive focus groups examining the drivers, configuration and benefits of collaborative procurement systems are recommended to reduce innovation obstacles.

Social implications

Society relies on urban infrastructure for daily living and the current study contributes to stretching infrastructure investment dollars and reducing the environmental impact of infrastructure provision.

Originality/value

No previous study has compared the perception of product innovation obstacles across different road industry supply chain partners. This is a significant gap, as differences in opinions across the supply chain need to be understood to develop the shared expectations and the improved relationships required to improve product innovation rates. Product innovation is important because it has been shown to improve efficiency (potentially addressing the road investment gap) and reduce deleterious environmental impacts.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Bingley: Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2019
Keywords
Innovation obstacles, Innovation barriers, Innovation adoption, Contextual determinants, Construction industry, Products, New product development, Road industry
National Category
Construction Management
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-39222 (URN)10.1108/CI-11-2017-0090 (DOI)
Note

Funding: Australian Research Council (LP0990553) and Queensland Government, Department of Transport and Main Roads (LP0990553).

Available from: 2019-04-11 Created: 2019-04-11 Last updated: 2019-04-17Bibliographically approved
Lindgren, J. & Widén, K. (2019). Exploring the dynamics of supplier innovation diffusion. In: Lill, I. & Witt, E. (Ed.), 10th Nordic Conference on Construction Economics and Organization: . Paper presented at 10th Nordic Conference on Construction Economics and Organization (CEO 2019), Tallinn, Estonia, 7-8 May, 2019 (pp. 221-228). Bingley: Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring the dynamics of supplier innovation diffusion
2019 (English)In: 10th Nordic Conference on Construction Economics and Organization / [ed] Lill, I. & Witt, E., Bingley: Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2019, Vol. 2, p. 221-228Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Purpose – This study aims to focus on a reinforcement supplier’s efforts to diffuse solutions, more or less innovative, in the construction sector to gain understanding of what facilitates and complicates innovation diffusion from a supplier perspective.

Design/Methodology/Approach – The interpretative research presented builds on 28 semi-structured interviews with the supplier and its customers and document studies. The research emphasizes dynamics in the diffusion process and rests on the assumption that the innovation content, innovation context and the innovation process interacts in the diffusion process.

Findings – The findings and the contribution from the study provide significant details concerning how the dimensions interact and how the diffusion process may unfold over time, but also that different solutions interact to push diffusion forward.

Research Limitations/Implications – The study relates to one supplier’s work and the interplay implies uniqueness in different cases. Studies in other contexts could, therefore, also be suitable to develop findings and their transferability.

Practical Implications – The study provides understanding for suppliers diffusing innovations in construction on how to act.

Originality/Value – A major contribution from the study is that it puts emphasis on how the diffusion process proceeds in interaction with its content and context and problematizes this dimension. Furthermore, the importance of nuancing sub-contexts to display decisive factors in the diffusion process is emphasized. © John Lindgren and Kristian Widén.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Bingley: Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2019
Series
Emerald Reach Proceedings Series, ISSN 2516-2853 ; 2
Keywords
Construction process, Diffusion, Interpretative position, Innovation Content, Innovation Context, Innovation Process
National Category
Construction Management
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-40600 (URN)978-1-83867-051-1 (ISBN)
Conference
10th Nordic Conference on Construction Economics and Organization (CEO 2019), Tallinn, Estonia, 7-8 May, 2019
Available from: 2019-09-18 Created: 2019-09-18 Last updated: 2019-09-19Bibliographically approved
Manley, K. & Widén, K. (2019). Prefabricated housing firms in Japan and Sweden: Learning from leading countries (1ed.). In: Jack S. Goulding & Farzad Pour Rahimian (Ed.), Offsite Production and Manufacturing for Innovative Construction: People, Process and Technology (pp. 399-418). Abingdon: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prefabricated housing firms in Japan and Sweden: Learning from leading countries
2019 (English)In: Offsite Production and Manufacturing for Innovative Construction: People, Process and Technology / [ed] Jack S. Goulding & Farzad Pour Rahimian, Abingdon: Routledge, 2019, 1, p. 399-418Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Abingdon: Routledge, 2019 Edition: 1
National Category
Construction Management
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-40241 (URN)978-1-138-55068-1 (ISBN)978-1-138-55071-1 (ISBN)978-1-315-14732-1 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-07-16 Created: 2019-07-16 Last updated: 2019-08-01Bibliographically approved
Steinhardt, D., Manley, K., Bildsten, L. & Widén, K. (2019). The structure of emergent prefabricated housing industries: a comparative case study of Australia and Sweden. Construction Management and Economics
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The structure of emergent prefabricated housing industries: a comparative case study of Australia and Sweden
2019 (English)In: Construction Management and Economics, ISSN 0144-6193, E-ISSN 1466-433XArticle in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Prefabricated housing is a disruptive innovation struggling to take hold in a traditional complex product system (CoPS). It is quicker to produce and has improved environmental performance compared to traditional housing. CoPS have more dense and complex network connections than commodity industries, making disruptive innovation more difficult. Effective relational capabilities can achieve the coordination necessary to address this challenge. The prefabricated housing industry needs to develop a structure that drives these capabilities. Using a case study methodology, the structure of the industry is examined in two contrasting countries, namely Australia and Sweden, as they represent an early and late stage of industry emergence, respectively. A new framework is proposed for this purpose, enabling a repeatable, orderly and comprehensive disaggregation of industry structure to examine the latent drivers of relational capability. The main empirical contribution is to (1) describe an industry that is yet to be formally recognized by national statistical agencies and (2) show how the adoption of prefabricated housing can be accelerated. The study found that younger industries need a focused industry association with diverse membership to act as an effective system integrator. © 2019 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Abingdon: Routledge, 2019
Keywords
Housing, prefabrication, complex product systems, Australia, Sweden, relationships, industry, innovation
National Category
Construction Management
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-39328 (URN)10.1080/01446193.2019.1588464 (DOI)2-s2.0-85064753731 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding: The Australian Research Council under grant number LP120100348.

Available from: 2019-05-08 Created: 2019-05-08 Last updated: 2019-10-15
Lindgren, J., Emmitt, S. & Widén, K. (2018). Construction projects as mechanisms for knowledge integration: mechanisms and effects when diffusing a systemic innovation. Engineering Construction and Architectural Management, 25(11), 1516-1533
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Construction projects as mechanisms for knowledge integration: mechanisms and effects when diffusing a systemic innovation
2018 (English)In: Engineering Construction and Architectural Management, ISSN 0969-9988, E-ISSN 1365-232X, Vol. 25, no 11, p. 1516-1533Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose - The aim of this research is to study knowledge integration (KI) when diffusing a systemic innovation. The objectives are to understand what mechanisms are used, and when and what their effects are in terms of knowledge development.

Design/Methodology/Approach - The method comprised a longitudinal case study which followed a firm’s attempts to develop and diffuse a timber multi-storey building system (the systemic innovation) over a number of projects.

Findings - The findings emphasize actual projects as the most crucial activity for KI and when and why soft personalization mechanisms and codified knowledge should be mixed.  Furthermore, it shows how different types of knowledge is built up including construction process effects over a series of projects.

Research limitations/implications -  The research contributes with knowledge about mechanisms for the diffusion of a specific systemic innovation type and provides input regarding mechanisms to use. The introduction of the concepts ‘domain-specific’, ‘procedural’ and ‘general knowledge’ into construction has increased understanding of innovation diffusion and knowledge flows and where and how they are integrated.

Practical Implications – The research shows how knowledge develops and through which mechanisms, and where problems occur. Construction organisations can learn from this to avoid mistakes and potentially better understand how to manage knowledge to diffuse a systemic innovation.

Originality/value - The research provides insight into systemic innovation diffusion over a series of projects and focuses on both projects and the construction process. © 2018, Emerald Publishing Limited.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Bingley: Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2018
Keywords
Knowledge management, Innovation, Case study
National Category
Construction Management
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-36247 (URN)10.1108/ECAM-02-2017-0022 (DOI)000447885000006 ()2-s2.0-85055321245 (Scopus ID)
Note

As manucript in thesis

Available from: 2018-02-08 Created: 2018-02-08 Last updated: 2018-11-27Bibliographically approved
Widén, K. & Winkler, C. (2018). Identifying bottlenecks in the photovoltaic systems innovation ecosystem – an initial study. In: : . Paper presented at SASBE 2018, Smart and Sustainable Built Environment Conference. 6th CIB International conference, Sydney, Australia, December 4-7, 2018 (pp. 360-367).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Identifying bottlenecks in the photovoltaic systems innovation ecosystem – an initial study
2018 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Solar energy is likely to play a major role in future renewable energy systems. One important part in that is the integration of photovoltaic (PV) systems into the built environment. Earlier studies show that the institutional framework plays a major role for achieving a broad implementation of PV systems. It has however also shown that the value network of PV systems needs to be understood and developed further. In that respect, earlier research on innovation diffusion into the built environment shows the necessity of involving and understanding key stakeholders. Stakeholder analysis may help in identifying key stakeholders but fail in assessing the stakeholders’ role in the value network as it does not, for example, take into account the relational effects. Innovation Eco Systems is an approach that has the potential to do this as it addresses the alignment structure of the partners needed for the value proposition to occur. The aim with this initial study is to address the use of innovation ecosystem as a way of assessing implementation of PV systems in the built environment. Two structured workshops with two key stakeholder categories, Clients and Suppliers, were held to identify the main barriers for a broader implementation of PV systems into the built environment in Sweden. The main results show that the earlier studies were right in that the institutional framework is a major factor, but also that the value network is important and that the problems in the value network is perceived somewhat different between the two categories. This suggests that it will be necessary to address the value network from the perspective of the actors by applying an innovation ecosystem analysis. It also helped in identifying other important stakeholders in the value network that will be needed to include in the future studies. To summarize, the findings of this initial study suggest that innovation ecosystem will address a more comprehensive picture on the implementation of PV systems in the built environment. However, to be able to identify bottlenecks and subsequent solutions to these bottlenecks further studies of the complete innovation ecosystem, with its stakeholders, is necessary. The ongoing project is currently carrying out these studies in a Swedish context.

Keywords
PV, implementation, innovation, ecosystems, bottlenecks, stakeholders
National Category
Construction Management
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-40595 (URN)
Conference
SASBE 2018, Smart and Sustainable Built Environment Conference. 6th CIB International conference, Sydney, Australia, December 4-7, 2018
Available from: 2019-09-17 Created: 2019-09-17 Last updated: 2019-09-19Bibliographically approved
Chen, L., Manley, K., Lewis, J., Helfer, F. & Widén, K. (2018). Procurement and Governance Choices for Collaborative Infrastructure Projects. Journal of construction engineering and management, 144(8), Article ID 04018071.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Procurement and Governance Choices for Collaborative Infrastructure Projects
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Journal of construction engineering and management, ISSN 0733-9364, E-ISSN 1943-7862, Vol. 144, no 8, article id 04018071Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Collaborative approaches to infrastructure procurement are increasingly popular around the world due to their potential to provide improved project performance compared with more traditional approaches. The problem is that project outcomes continue to be unpredictable. Previous research has shown that this is the case regardless of whether the chosen procurement approach is based on price or non price selection of the project team. This is a major choice that clients make, but the presented research shows that governance choices for project execution are more important. This is significant because clients tend to focus more on procurement choices and typically do not differentiate governance based on those choices. This needs to change, and the authors show that optimal governance configurations vary on the basis of the chosen type of team configuration. For example, three specific governance arrangements for workshops are highlighted for single teams, and two specific governance arrangements for risk/reward sharing are highlighted for multiple teams. This study identifies governance actions that are associated with superior time and cost outcomes on collaborative infrastructure projects in Australia run by experienced public-sector clients under the two procurement scenarios. Based on a survey of 320 senior managers, independent sample t-tests were conducted to compare the application of governance actions among three distinct groups of projects, based on type of team selection and type of project outcome. The study provides evidence of the most effective approaches to project governance in a country that is a world leader. The results provide much needed recommendations for improved project performance based on large-scale quantitative analysis, which before now has not existed. Overall, the study recommends more attention be paid to noncontractual governance under both approaches to team selection, although the specific actions recommended vary. © 2018 American Society of Civil Engineers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Reston, VA: American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), 2018
National Category
Civil Engineering Construction Management
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-36880 (URN)10.1061/(ASCE)CO.1943-7862.0001525 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-05-31 Created: 2018-05-31 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
Lindgren, J. & Widén, K. (2017). Diffusing building information management: knowledge integration, mechanisms and knowledge development. Architectural Engineering and Design Management, 14(5), 347-362
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Diffusing building information management: knowledge integration, mechanisms and knowledge development
2017 (English)In: Architectural Engineering and Design Management, ISSN 1745-2007, E-ISSN 1752-7589, Vol. 14, no 5, p. 347-362Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Building Information Management (BIM) is a systemic inter-organizational innovation predicted to have a great impact on the efficiency of the construction process. An enabler for its diffusion is knowledge integration (KI). This research investigates KI mechanisms used by a Concrete Reinforcement Supplier and its customers in the diffusion of BIM and BIM-related solutions. The research employs a qualitative approach with multiple data-collection methods at two different points in time. BIM diffusion and KI are viewed here as emergent and iterative processes, understood from a supplier perspective. The research examines the interaction between context, content of the diffusing innovation and the diffusion process. Knowledge development from the KI process has been assessed by exploring the interaction between (1) domain-specific knowledge, (2) procedural knowledge and (3) general knowledge, complementing the established emphasis on tacit and explicit knowledge found in relevant construction management research. The findings indicate that general knowledge needs to be high for increased BIM diffusion and the research raises the need to develop procedural knowledge both from a practical and research perspective. © 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Abingdon: Earthscan Publications Ltd., 2017
Keywords
Building information management, innovation diffusion, systemic innovations, knowledge integration mechanisms, knowledge development
National Category
Construction Management
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-35839 (URN)10.1080/17452007.2017.1394260 (DOI)2-s2.0-85032674248 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-12-13 Created: 2017-12-13 Last updated: 2018-07-30Bibliographically approved
Widén, K. (2017). Innovation roles for clients: implementing building information modelling. In: Kim Haugbølle & David Boyd (Ed.), Clients and Users in Construction: Agency, Governance and Innovation (pp. 214-228). Abingdon: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Innovation roles for clients: implementing building information modelling
2017 (English)In: Clients and Users in Construction: Agency, Governance and Innovation / [ed] Kim Haugbølle & David Boyd, Abingdon: Routledge, 2017, p. 214-228Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Abingdon: Routledge, 2017
Series
CIB, the International Council for Research and Innovation in Building and Construction
National Category
Construction Management
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-34362 (URN)10.4324/9781315644783 (DOI)2-s2.0-85028057752 (Scopus ID)9781138786868 (ISBN)9781315644783 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-06-27 Created: 2017-06-27 Last updated: 2018-03-15Bibliographically approved
Al Nasseri, H. A., Widén, K. & Aulin, R. (2016). A taxonomy of planning and scheduling methods to support their more efficient use in construction project management. Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology, 14(3), 580-601
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A taxonomy of planning and scheduling methods to support their more efficient use in construction project management
2016 (English)In: Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology, ISSN 1726-0531, E-ISSN 1758-8901, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 580-601Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The implementation and control processes of project planning and scheduling involve a wide range of methods and tools. Despite the development and modification and integration of the project management theory with newer scheduling approaches in particular, practitioners’ views on the efficiency and effectiveness of these methods and tools differ. This situation can be attributed in part to a lack of understanding of the most appropriate basis for implementing these methods and tools. This study, therefore, aims to overcome this deficiency by conceptualizing and adopting a taxonomy of planning and scheduling methods.

Design/methodology/approach: The study is based on a review and discourse analysis of the literature covering a large number of theoretical and empirical studies. The underlying theories of various planning and scheduling methods were analyzed with respect to the taxonomy criteria adopted in the study.

Findings: Using the taxonomy, the key characteristics of planning and scheduling methods considered in this study were identified and interpreted. These included concepts and theories; key features; suitability and usability; and benefits and limitations. Overall, the findings suggest that project managers should consider taxonomy as a support tool for selecting and prioritizing the most appropriate method or combination of methods for managing their projects. Recommendations include the need for more advanced or multi-dimensional taxonomies to cope with the diversity of project type and size.

Originality/value: The results of the study allow project managers to improve their current practices by utilizing taxonomy when considering the implementation of planning and scheduling methods. Moreover, taxonomy can be considered as a tool to promote learning on the part of those less experienced in planning and scheduling. Taxonomy can be considered as an initial platform for further research in this area. © 2016, © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Bingley: Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2016
Keywords
Planning, Construction management, Implementation, Taxonomy, Project management, Control systems, Project planning, Scheduling, Schedule control
National Category
Construction Management
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-36583 (URN)10.1108/JEDT-11-2013-0078 (DOI)000405490400010 ()2-s2.0-84979072982 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-04-05 Created: 2018-04-05 Last updated: 2018-04-06Bibliographically approved
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