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Publications (10 of 24) Show all publications
Holmén, M., Gullbrand, J., Barth, H. & Florén, H. (2019). Additive manufacturing and industrial transformation: evidence from the literature. In: : . Paper presented at 7th European conference on corporate research and development (R&D) and innovation (CONCORDi 2019), Seville, Spain, September 25-27, 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Additive manufacturing and industrial transformation: evidence from the literature
2019 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-40851 (URN)
Conference
7th European conference on corporate research and development (R&D) and innovation (CONCORDi 2019), Seville, Spain, September 25-27, 2019
Funder
Knowledge Foundation, 220018
Available from: 2019-11-06 Created: 2019-11-06 Last updated: 2019-11-07
Björkdahl, J. & Holmén, M. (2019). Exploiting the control revolution by means of digitalization: Value creation, value capture, and downstream movements. Industrial and Corporate Change, 28(3), 423-436, Article ID dty022.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploiting the control revolution by means of digitalization: Value creation, value capture, and downstream movements
2019 (English)In: Industrial and Corporate Change, ISSN 0960-6491, E-ISSN 1464-3650, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 423-436, article id dty022Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article explains why firms move downstream to profit from the value they create for customers through improved control. Under certain circumstances, product innovations and services are dynamically interdependent in the sense of improved control creating value for the customer. Since value capture is distinct from value creation, firms may need to change their means of appropriation to profit. Empirically, the article analyses how firms can renew their product offerings by incorporating control technologies into their traditional mechanical engineering products. In contrast to a strand in the recent strategy literature that argues that manufacturing firms should move downstream to deliver complementary services, this article explains these shifts as related to increased control, economies of throughput, value creation, and value capture. The article contributes to the throughput and control technology literature by showing the importance of differentiating value creation from value capture. The increased control by means of digitalization and the discrepancy between value creation and value capture explains why many manufacturing firms will become service firms.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2019
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-38607 (URN)10.1093/icc/dty022 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-12-14 Created: 2018-12-14 Last updated: 2019-05-17Bibliographically approved
Barth, H. (2019). The use and abuse of 3D printing - Towards a mobile business model framework. International Journal of Engineering Research and Applications, 9(11), 1-9
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The use and abuse of 3D printing - Towards a mobile business model framework
2019 (English)In: International Journal of Engineering Research and Applications, ISSN 2248-9622, E-ISSN 2248-9622, Vol. 9, no 11, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed) In press
Abstract [en]

The paper aim to clarify changes in user activities and behaviour across different types of actors following the development of 3D printers. It proposes a mobile business model and outlining the features of development for direct digital manufacturing.

The exploratory study show that the use of 3D printing a) lowers the knowledge and resource barriers for experimentation and entrepreneurial entry, b) increases product and concept prototyping in product development, c) provides a potential for business model innovation by expanding the boundaries of the firm upstream and downstream, and d) becomes a ticket for entrepreneurial entry

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Ghaziabad: International Journal of Engineering Research and Applications, 2019
Keywords
additive manufacturing, 3d printing, business model
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-40987 (URN)10.9790/9622-0911010109 (DOI)
Projects
Digital production
Funder
Knowledge Foundation
Available from: 2019-11-19 Created: 2019-11-19 Last updated: 2019-12-11
Holmén, M., Ljungberg, D. & Preciado, D. J. (2018). Evolution of systems of technology transfer in rural developing economies. In: : . Paper presented at 17th International Schumpeter Society Conference, Seoul, South Korea, July 2-4, 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evolution of systems of technology transfer in rural developing economies
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Longitudinal studies show that technology transfer changes over time but do not systematically address how this occurs. This paper addresses the evolution of technology transfer by analyzing changes in the focal actors, their perceived problems, problem-solving activities and implemented technological and organizational solutions. Empirically, we analyze the evolution of fish and silk production in Cauca, Colombia, a rural region characterized by a low level of education. While production was initiated by national and international governments, these policy programs failed by themselves to establish technology transfer activities successfully because of governmental short sightedness, lack of producer commitment and transferor-producer arm’s length relations. Over time, interaction among producers and producer cooperatives (recipients), universities (transferors) and intermediaries created a “technology transfer system”. The creation and professionalization of the cooperatives and intermediaries were key events allowing for creating a functioning technology transfer system. The evolution of the system was largely determined by the types of problems the main actors formulated and acted upon. Major problem diversified from being technology-related, to customer, market and distribution oriented. A main organizing principle of both solving and formulating these problems consisted of projects, which means the evolution can be characterized by sequences of projects addressing specific and changing problems over time. The cases are in in line with evolutionary theorizing and the paper concludes with general lessons for technology transfer from an evolutionary perspective.

Keywords
technology transfer, evolutionary approach, rural developing economies
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-38608 (URN)
Conference
17th International Schumpeter Society Conference, Seoul, South Korea, July 2-4, 2018
Available from: 2018-12-14 Created: 2018-12-14 Last updated: 2019-01-14
Holmén, M. & Linnér, M. (2018). How acquisitions affect innovation and entrepreneurial behaviour: An innovation governance perspective. In: : . Paper presented at Australian Centre for Entrepreneurship (ACE) Research Exchange Conference 2018, Brisbane, Australia, 6 – 9 February, 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How acquisitions affect innovation and entrepreneurial behaviour: An innovation governance perspective
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

There are many studies of how acquisitions of small technology based startups and firms affect innovation growth and performance but less attention on how acquisitions affect the innovative behavior of the acquired firms. This paper explains changes in the innovative behavior of acquired technology-based small firms from an innovation governance perspective. An interview based case study of founder and top managers of three acquisitions by a Swedish medium-sized IT company from an insider-outsider perspective found that innovative efforts shifted from building a company to an incremental product innovation focus, by means of accumulation of continuous hardware and software upgrades. This “acquisitional” termination of innovative and entrepreneurial behavior is explained by a shift in vision from firm creation by founders (owners) to a product-oriented vision driven by product managers. This vision framed the underlying dimension of discovering opportunities, which became oriented towards improved product performance and was executed by formal and informal steering relating to incremental product innovations. Capability creation related to product and marketing to support the product-oriented business units. The paper suggests that the focus on Schumpeterian innovative behavior of acquired entrepreneurial firms from an innovation governance perspective is a useful new way of analyzing technology-based acquisitions.

Keywords
Innovation governance, acquisitions, innovation
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-36464 (URN)
Conference
Australian Centre for Entrepreneurship (ACE) Research Exchange Conference 2018, Brisbane, Australia, 6 – 9 February, 2018
Available from: 2018-03-19 Created: 2018-03-19 Last updated: 2018-12-17Bibliographically approved
Holmén, M., Broechner, J. & Mokhlesian, S. (2017). Integrating contractor and property developer for product system innovations. Facilities, 35(9/10), 511-524
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Integrating contractor and property developer for product system innovations
2017 (English)In: Facilities, ISSN 0263-2772, E-ISSN 1758-7131, Vol. 35, no 9/10, p. 511-524Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose - The aim of this paper is to explain why construction groups facing opportunities for product system innovations, such as green buildings, may choose to integrate construction and property development, taking on facilities management (FM) for a limited period.

Design/methodology/approach - Conceptual analysis based on prior literature and illustrated by a single case of integration.

Findings - For product system innovations, an in-house developer should be more able to reduce uncertainty than independent developers, due to unobservable long-term technological quality for customers, because the property becomes associated with lower risk after having been owned and operated. Alternatives such as building certification systems support incremental innovations, warranties suffer from double moral hazard in the long run and risk allocation in public- private partnership projects often fails to encourage system innovations. Integration allows the contractor to work continuously with innovative projects, developing new capabilities, which allow the firm to signal proficiency to the market, employees and the investment community.

Research limitations/implications - The phenomenon is new, and further empirical surveys are needed to confirm the hypothetical conclusions drawn here.

Practical implications - The value of close collaboration between those who develop innovative green building technologies and facilities managers is outlined.

Originality/value - The relation between the scope of corporate activities in construction groups, technological innovations and FM has not been studied before.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Bingley: Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2017
Keywords
Facilities management, Green issues, Corporate strategy, Business development, Technological innovation, Clients
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-35612 (URN)10.1108/F-10-2016-0094 (DOI)000407438200002 ()2-s2.0-85027067597 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-11-30 Created: 2017-11-30 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Laurell, H. & Holmén, M. (2017). Internationalization through business model innovation in the medical technology sector. In: Lucia Piscitello & Stefano Elia (Ed.), Proceedings of the 43rd Annual Conference of the European International Business Academy: International Businessin the Information Age. Paper presented at 43rd Annual Conference of the European International Business Academy (EIBA2017), Milan, Italy, 14th - 16th December 2017 (pp. 59-59).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Internationalization through business model innovation in the medical technology sector
2017 (English)In: Proceedings of the 43rd Annual Conference of the European International Business Academy: International Businessin the Information Age / [ed] Lucia Piscitello & Stefano Elia, 2017, p. 59-59Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-36497 (URN)978-88-6493-042-8 (ISBN)
Conference
43rd Annual Conference of the European International Business Academy (EIBA2017), Milan, Italy, 14th - 16th December 2017
Available from: 2018-03-22 Created: 2018-03-22 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Holmén, M. & Florén, H. (2017). Types and Nature of Business Model Innovation Processes. In: Australian Centre for Entrepreneurship (ACE) Research Exchange Conference 2017: . Paper presented at ACERE Conference - the Australian Centre for Entrepreneurship Research Exchange sixth edition conference, 7 – 10 February, 2019, Melbourne, Australia (pp. 19-19).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Types and Nature of Business Model Innovation Processes
2017 (English)In: Australian Centre for Entrepreneurship (ACE) Research Exchange Conference 2017, 2017, p. 19-19Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The paper explores the population of business model innovation processes of incumbent rms Thus, the paper identi es and describes different types of business model innovation processes and set out to characterize their relations We suggest that there are (at least) seven types of business model innovation processes: i) No process, (ii) “lazy approach”, (iii) tools approach, (iv) (unintentional) trial and error or “business model innovation happens”, (v) (intentional) experimental approach, (vi) trigger-oriented approach, and (vii) planned (sequential) approach By depicting business model innovation processes as involving (a) cognitive operations, (b) eld activities, and (c) creation of artefacts, the seven identi ed types of business model innovation processes are characterized and related Type (i) and (ii) have rarely been dealt with in the literature, despite their commonality Type (iii) has recently become much used, sometimes being a managerial toy, sometimes as a crucial mechanisms or stage gate for business creation and is often a critical part of the other approaches The paper concludes by suggesting a typology of business model innovation processes, based on the identi cation of three dimensions: intentional vs unintentional, ad hoc vs systematic and event- vs process- oriented

Keywords
Business Model Innovation
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-40850 (URN)
Conference
ACERE Conference - the Australian Centre for Entrepreneurship Research Exchange sixth edition conference, 7 – 10 February, 2019, Melbourne, Australia
Funder
Knowledge Foundation, 220018
Available from: 2019-11-06 Created: 2019-11-06 Last updated: 2020-01-24Bibliographically approved
Egeskog, A., Barretto, A., Berndes, G., Freitas, F., Holmén, M., Sparovek, G. & Torén, J. (2016). Actions and opinions of Brazilian farmers who shift to sugarcane: an interview-based assessment with discussion of implications for land-use change. Land use policy, 57, 594-604
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Actions and opinions of Brazilian farmers who shift to sugarcane: an interview-based assessment with discussion of implications for land-use change
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2016 (English)In: Land use policy, ISSN 0264-8377, E-ISSN 1873-5754, Vol. 57, p. 594-604Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Sugarcane ethanol systems can deliver large greenhouse gas emissions savings if emissions associated with land-use change are kept low. This qualitative study documents and analyzes actions and opinions among Brazilian farmers who shift to sugarcane production. Semi-structured interviews were held with 28 actors associated with sugarcane production in three different regions: one traditional sugarcane region and two regions where sugarcane is currently expanding. Most farmers considered sugarcane a land diversification option with relatively low economic risk, although higher risk than their previous land use. Beef production was considered a low-risk option, but less profitable than sugarcane. In conjunction with converting part of their land to sugarcane, most farmers maintained and further intensified their previous agricultural activity, often beef production. Several farmers invested in expanded production in other regions with relatively low land prices. Very few farmers in the expansion regions shifted all their land from the former, less profitable, use to sugarcane. Very few farmers in this study had deforested any land in connection with changes made when shifting to sugarcane. The respondents understand “environmental friendliness” as compliance with the relevant legislation, especially the Brazilian Forest Act, which is also a requirement for delivering sugarcane to the mills. Indirect land-use change is not a concern for the interviewed farmers, and conversion of forests and other native vegetation into sugarcane plantations is uncontroversial if legal. We derive hypotheses regarding farmers’ actions and opinions from our results. These hypotheses aim to contribute to better understanding of what takes place in conjunction with expansion of sugarcane and can, when tested further, be of use in developing, e.g., policies for iLUC-free biofuel production.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Kidlington: Pergamon Press, 2016
Keywords
Beef, Brazil, Deforestation, iLUC policy, Pasture intensification, Rural farmers
National Category
Agricultural Science, Forestry and Fisheries
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-32344 (URN)10.1016/j.landusepol.2016.06.022 (DOI)000382341200053 ()2-s2.0-84976440497 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-11-01 Created: 2016-11-01 Last updated: 2018-03-23Bibliographically approved
Björkdahl, J., Holmén, M. & Fallahi, S. (2016). Business model innovation processes: Looking forward and looking backward. In: Academy of Management Conference: . Paper presented at 2016 Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management, Anaheim, California, United States, August 5-9, 2016. AOM
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Business model innovation processes: Looking forward and looking backward
2016 (English)In: Academy of Management Conference, AOM, 2016Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
AOM: , 2016
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-32702 (URN)
Conference
2016 Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management, Anaheim, California, United States, August 5-9, 2016
Available from: 2016-12-15 Created: 2016-12-15 Last updated: 2018-03-23Bibliographically approved
Projects
Managing Additive Manufacturing for Professional Engineers (MAMPE) [2018-03822_Vinnova]; Halmstad University
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-0560-7392

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