hh.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Brorsson, Sofia
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 37) Show all publications
Malmborg, J., Bremander, A., Olsson, M. C., Bergman, A.-C., Brorsson, S. & Bergman, S. (2018). Sleeping Problems and Anxiety is Associated to Chronic Multisite Musculoskeletal Pain in Swedish High School Students. Paper presented at Annual European Congress of Rheumatology EULAR, Amsterdam, Netherlands, 13-16 June, 2018. Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, 77(Suppl. 2), 226-226, Article ID OP0361-HPR.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sleeping Problems and Anxiety is Associated to Chronic Multisite Musculoskeletal Pain in Swedish High School Students
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 77, no Suppl. 2, p. 226-226, article id OP0361-HPRArticle in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The relationship between chronic multisite musculoskeletal pain (CMP) and sleep is complex, where pain can lead to sleeping problems and lack of sleep can intensify the pain perception. Most previous studies relates to adults, but adolescents may also suffer from CMP, and there is a need for more knowledge regarding the relationships between CMP and sleeping problems, stress, anxiety, depression, and health status.

Objectives: To study background factors associated to CMP in first year Swedish high school students.

Methods: First year Swedish high school students (n=296) were invited to complete questionnaires on chronic pain (mannequin with 18 body regions), sleeping problems (Uppsala Sleep Inventory, four items scored from 1–5), stress (ELO questions, scored from 1–5), anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, scored from 0–21), health status (EQ-5D, scored from 0 to 1, worst to best) and physical activity (International Physical Activity Questionnaire, categorised into low, moderate and high levels). Stress and sleeping items were dichotomized into 1–3 points (best) vs 4–5 points (worst). Individuals scoring at least severe problems (4 points) at one or more sleeping items were classified as having severe sleeping problems. HADS were categorised as non-cases (0–7), possible7–10 and probable cases (11–21 points). Students were grouped as having CMP (pain present in ≥3 regions) or not (no chronic pain or chronic pain in 1–2 regions). Multiple logistic regression analyses (adjusted for sex) with CMP as dependent variable were performed in SPSS, version 24.

Results: 254 students (86% of total sample, 87 boys and 167 girls) with a mean age of 16.1 (SD 0.6) years participated in the study. CMP was present in 25 (9.8%) students with no differences between boys and girls (8.0% vs 10.8%; p=0.488). Having CMP was associated with reporting severe sleeping problems (OR 2.49, 95% CI: 1.06 to 5.81, p=0.035) with initiating sleep, maintaining sleep, early morning awakenings and/or not feeling restored after sleep in comparison to the other students. Students with CMP were more likely to be categorised as probable cases for anxiety (OR 3.06, 95% CI: 1.09 to 8.61, p=0.034), but there were no associations for possible cases for anxiety (OR 1.15, 95% CI: 0.38 to 3.51, p=0.800), possible cases (OR 2.03, 95% CI: 0.63 to 6.54), or probable cases for depression (OR 3.35, 95% CI: 0.33 to 33.83). There was a nearly significant association between stress and belonging to the CMP group (OR 2.31, 95% CI: 0.97 to 5.53, p=0.059). A higher self-reported health status was associated to a lower likelihood for CMP (OR 0.04, 95% CI: 0.01 to 0.27, p=0.001). Distribution of physical activity levels of low, moderate and high was not significantly associated to having CMP in comparison with not having it.

Conclusions: One in ten high school students fulfilled criteria for having chronic multisite musculoskeletal pain. CMP was associated to sleeping problems, anxiety, and a worse health status. The results from this study may be used by school health-care professionals in their preventive work to promote student’s health.

Disclosure of Interest: None declared

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2018
National Category
Clinical Medicine Rheumatology and Autoimmunity
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-36813 (URN)
Conference
Annual European Congress of Rheumatology EULAR, Amsterdam, Netherlands, 13-16 June, 2018
Available from: 2018-05-23 Created: 2018-05-23 Last updated: 2018-07-31Bibliographically approved
Lundgren, L., Zügner, R., Tranberg, R., Brorsson, S. & Osvalder, A.-L. (2017). Effect of stance width on kinematics of laboratory landings with fixed feet on a kiteboard. In: : . Paper presented at Congress of the European Society of Biomechanics (ESB), Seville, Spain, July 2-5, 2017.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effect of stance width on kinematics of laboratory landings with fixed feet on a kiteboard
Show others...
2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Other Mechanical Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-35162 (URN)
Conference
Congress of the European Society of Biomechanics (ESB), Seville, Spain, July 2-5, 2017
Funder
Swedish National Centre for Research in Sports
Note

Funding: Swedish Research Council for Sport Science, and the Gothenburg Sports Test Centre

Available from: 2017-10-06 Created: 2017-10-06 Last updated: 2018-03-23Bibliographically approved
Bergman, S., Bremander, A., Bergman, A.-C. & Brorsson, S. (2015). Chronic Widespread Pain in Adolescents Is Highly Associated to Stress and Anxiety. Paper presented at 2015 ACR/ARHP Annual Meeting, San Francisco, CA, USA, November 6-11, 2015. Arthritis & Rheumatology, 67(Suppl. S10), Article ID 917.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Chronic Widespread Pain in Adolescents Is Highly Associated to Stress and Anxiety
2015 (English)In: Arthritis & Rheumatology, ISSN 2326-5191, E-ISSN 2326-5205, Vol. 67, no Suppl. S10, article id 917Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background/Purpose: Chronic widespread pain (CWP), one of the hallmarks of fibromyalgia, is not uncommon in adolescents and it has previously been shown that adolescents with pain often become young adults with pain. CWP often co-varies with anxiety, depression, and stress symptoms in adults, but the knowledge regarding this is small in youth and young adults.

The aim was to study the associations between CWP, anxiety, depression and stress in adolescents attending first year of high school.

Methods: A computerized questionnaire to 296 adolescents attending Swedish high school, with validated questions regarding presence and distribution of pain (Epipain mannequin), stress symptoms (ELO question), anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale – HADS), and health related quality of life (HRQL as measured by EQ5D). Pain was considered chronic when persistent for more than three months, and the subgroup CWP was defined according to the 1990 ACR criteria for fibromyalgia. Statistical analyses in SPSS v21 with comparison of means by Student’s t-test and proportions by chi2-test or Fischer’s exact test.

Results: 257 (87%) out of 296 eligible students, mean (SD) age 16.1 (0.7) and 65.8% girls, responded to the questionnaire.  Prevalence of chronic pain was 20.8% and that of the subgroup CWP was 4.7%, without any gender differences (boys 18.2% vs girls 22.2%; p=0.224, and 3.4% vs 5.4%; p=0.692). High level (4 or 5 on a 5 point scale) of stress symptoms were less common in boys (16.0% vs 28.2%; p=0.015), as was possible or probable anxiety (17.1% vs 44.4%; p<0.001), but not depression (10.3% vs 12.5%; p=0.764). Students with high level of stress reported CWP five times more often than those with less stress (30.4% vs 5.8%; p=0.001). Students with probable anxiety reported CWP ten times more often than students with no anxiety (17.6% vs 1.8%; p=0.001), and CWP was also more common, but not statistically significant, in students with probable depression (20.0% vs 3.1%; p=0.163). Those reporting CWP had significantly lower HRQL (0.58 vs 0.87; p=0.038) than students with no chronic pain.

Conclusion: The high prevalence of chronic pain and the strong associations between CWP and reports of stress and anxiety in adolescents highlights that a multifactorial background to chronic pain must be considered early in life. An apparent lower score in EQ5D also indicates that the presence of CWP has an marked impact on HRQL also in adolescents.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, 2015
Keywords
Anxiety, Chronic pain, health, stress
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-29849 (URN)10.1002/art.39448 (DOI)000370860202181 ()
Conference
2015 ACR/ARHP Annual Meeting, San Francisco, CA, USA, November 6-11, 2015
Available from: 2015-11-30 Created: 2015-11-30 Last updated: 2018-03-22Bibliographically approved
Brorsson, S., Nilsdotter, A., Thorstensson, C. & Bremander, A. (2014). Differences in muscle activity during hand-dexterity tasks between women with arthritis and a healthy reference group. BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, 15(1), Article ID 154.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Differences in muscle activity during hand-dexterity tasks between women with arthritis and a healthy reference group
2014 (English)In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 15, no 1, article id 154Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Impaired hand function is common in patients with arthritis and it affects performance of daily activities; thus, hand exercises are recommended. There is little information on the extent to which the disease affects activation of the flexor and extensor muscles during these hand-dexterity tasks. The purpose of this study was to compare muscle activation during such tasks in subjects with arthritis and in a healthy reference group.

METHODS: Muscle activation was measured in m. extensor digitorium communis (EDC) and in m. flexor carpi radialis (FCR) with surface electromyography (EMG) in women with rheumatoid arthritis (RA, n = 20), hand osteoarthritis (HOA, n = 16) and in a healthy reference group (n = 20) during the performance of four daily activity tasks and four hand exercises. Maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) was measured to enable intermuscular comparisons, and muscle activation is presented as %MVIC.

RESULTS: The arthritis group used a higher %MVIC than the reference group in both FCR and EDC when cutting with a pair of scissors, pulling up a zipper and-for the EDC-also when writing with a pen and using a key (p < 0.02). The exercise "rolling dough with flat hands" required the lowest %MVIC and may be less effective in improving muscle strength.

CONCLUSIONS: Women with arthritis tend to use higher levels of muscle activation in daily tasks than healthy women, and wrist extensors and flexors appear to be equally affected. It is important that hand training programs reflect real-life situations and focus also on extensor strength. © 2014 Brorsson et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London, England: BioMed Central, 2014
Keywords
Muscle activation, Muscle extension force, Flexion force, Female, Daily activities
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-26417 (URN)10.1186/1471-2474-15-154 (DOI)000337326200001 ()24886491 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84903584119 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2014-09-10 Created: 2014-09-10 Last updated: 2018-10-22Bibliographically approved
Albinsson, J., Brorsson, S., Rydén Ahlgren, Å. & Cinthio, M. (2014). Improved tracking performance of lagrangian block-matching methodologies using block expansion in the time domain: In silico, phantom and invivo evaluations. Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology, 40(10), 2508-2520
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Improved tracking performance of lagrangian block-matching methodologies using block expansion in the time domain: In silico, phantom and invivo evaluations
2014 (English)In: Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology, ISSN 0301-5629, E-ISSN 1879-291X, Vol. 40, no 10, p. 2508-2520Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to evaluate tracking performance when an extra reference block is added to a basic block-matching method, where the two reference blocks originate from two consecutive ultrasound frames. The use of an extra reference block was evaluated for two putative benefits: (i) an increase in tracking performance while maintaining the size of the reference blocks, evaluated using in silico and phantom cine loops; (ii) a reduction in the size of the reference blocks while maintaining the tracking performance, evaluated using in vivo cine loops of the common carotid artery where the longitudinal movement of the wall was estimated. The results indicated that tracking accuracy improved (mean - 48%, p<0.005 [in silico]; mean - 43%, p<0.01 [phantom]), and there was a reduction in size of the reference blocks while maintaining tracking performance (mean - 19%, p<0.01 [in vivo]). This novel method will facilitate further exploration of the longitudinal movement of the arterial wall. (C) 2014 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2014
Keywords
Ultrasound, Motion estimation, Longitudinal movement, Speckle tracking, Arterial wall movement
National Category
Medical Image Processing Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging Computer Vision and Robotics (Autonomous Systems) Signal Processing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-35444 (URN)10.1016/j.ultrasmedbio.2014.05.010 (DOI)000343144400020 ()25130445 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84926250866 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-11-22 Created: 2017-11-22 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
Brorsson, S., Thorstensson, C., Nilsdotter, A. & Bremander, A. (2014). Two different sets of handexercises improved grip strength after after eight weeks in patients with arthritis. Paper presented at EULAR (The European League Against Rheumatism) Annual European Congress of Rheumatology, Paris, France, 11-14 June, 2014. Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, 73(Suppl. 2), 1210-1210
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Two different sets of handexercises improved grip strength after after eight weeks in patients with arthritis
2014 (English)In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 73, no Suppl. 2, p. 1210-1210Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background Hand function measured as grip force and finger extension force is often impaired in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and hand osteoarthritis (HOA) affecting performance of daily activities why hand exercises are recommended. A number of hand exercises are often used in the clinic but there is little information about “the effects of a minimal set of hand exercises” and if the choice of exercises is important to improve strength and function in the hand.

Objectives To study the effect on grip- and finger extension strength and patient reported hand function from two different sets of handexercises performed over 8 weeks using a randomized study design.

Methods Female patients with arthritis (RA and HOA, n=121) were randomly assigned to two different sets of handexercises (HE) for 8 weeks. The four hand exercises applied in the program were exercises commonly used in traditional hand training programs. The exercises were split into two groups depending on if the muscle activation (measured with EMG) were greater in forearm flexor (HE I, n=62) or in extensor muscles (HE II, n=59) (REF). HE I: isolated finger opposition (digits II-V) and rolling the putty with a flat hand, HE II: squeezing the putty and finger extension with putty resistance. The two HE were performed daily and each set was repeated 15 times, training time per day was maximum 5 minutes 7 days/week.

Grip strength was measured with Grippit and finger extension strength with EX-it both validated instruments (unit: N). Pain was measured with a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), 0-10 (best to worst). Hand functions were evaluated with the patient reported questionnaire Quick Disability Arm Shoulder and Hand (QuickDASH), 0-100 (best to worst).

Results Mean grip strength (p=0.01) and mean finger extension force (p=0.004) increased after the training period in the group using HE I. In HE II the mean finger extension force increased (p=0.044), table 1. Hand function was stable over the training period.

Table 1.

Descriptive data of finger extension (EXIT) force and grip strength in the right hand, hand function (QuickDASH) and VAS pain presented as mean ± SD (min–max)

Conclusions Five daily minutes with two hand exercises resulted increased grip strength and finger extension force after eight weeks. We suggest that hand exercises should be combined and selected to improve both flexor and extensor muscle strength of the forearm.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: BMJ Books, 2014
National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-25237 (URN)10.1136/annrheumdis-2014-eular.4883 (DOI)000346919806471 ()
Conference
EULAR (The European League Against Rheumatism) Annual European Congress of Rheumatology, Paris, France, 11-14 June, 2014
Available from: 2014-04-30 Created: 2014-04-30 Last updated: 2018-03-22Bibliographically approved
Brorsson, S. (2012). Biomechanical studies on hand function in rehabilitation. In: Tarun Goswami (Ed.), Human Musculoskeletal Biomechanics (pp. 87-106). New York: InTech
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Biomechanical studies on hand function in rehabilitation
2012 (English)In: Human Musculoskeletal Biomechanics / [ed] Tarun Goswami, New York: InTech, 2012, p. 87-106Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: InTech, 2012
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-15323 (URN)978-953-307-638-6 (ISBN)
Available from: 2011-06-10 Created: 2011-06-10 Last updated: 2018-03-22Bibliographically approved
Lundgren, L., Brorsson, S. & Osvalder, A.-L. (2012). Comfort aspects important for the performance and safety of kitesurfing. Paper presented at IEA 2012: 18th World congress on Ergonomics - Designing a sustainable future, Recife, Brazil, 12-16 February, 2012. Work: A journal of Prevention, Assesment and rehabilitation, 41(Suppl. 1), 1221-1225
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comfort aspects important for the performance and safety of kitesurfing
2012 (English)In: Work: A journal of Prevention, Assesment and rehabilitation, ISSN 1051-9815, E-ISSN 1875-9270, Vol. 41, no Suppl. 1, p. 1221-1225Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Equipment used in sports is of great importance, especially when the equipment is in direct contact with the athlete or is important for safety. In the sport kitesurfing environmental factors and the equipment design are crucial for the comfort and safety. The participants’ choice and opinion of equipment can show which factors are considered most important for the performance and to reduce risk for injury. This study has evaluated self-reported information from the participants about what equipment they use, comfort of the equipment and if the equipment has contributed to any injuries. The methods used were questionnaires (n=206) and interviews (n=17), which in combination allows to assess the problem both quantitatively and qualitatively. The results showed that supported leading edge kites are most frequently used, with a waist harness and foot straps to attach the feet. The choice of kite type was mainly based on the discipline of riding for the respondent. Some issues concerning comfort of riding and injury risk the respondents did relate to the design of harness and foot straps. The information from this study can be used for development strategies for industry manufacturers and for further studies in the area of equipment design and biomechanics. © 2012 - IOS Press and the authors. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Amsterdam: IOS Press, 2012
Keywords
sport equipment, kitesurfing, injury risk, product comfort
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-19725 (URN)10.3233/WOR-2012-0306-1221 (DOI)000306361801054 ()22316886 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84859837158 (Scopus ID)
Conference
IEA 2012: 18th World congress on Ergonomics - Designing a sustainable future, Recife, Brazil, 12-16 February, 2012
Available from: 2012-10-04 Created: 2012-09-25 Last updated: 2018-03-22Bibliographically approved
Brorsson, S., Gelzinis, A., Tonkonogi, M. & Verikas, A. (2012). Differences in the muscle activities in the forearm muscles in healthy men and women. In: Kylie Tucker et al. (Ed.), Proceedings of the XIXth Congress of the International Society of Electrophysiology & Kinesiology: . Paper presented at XIXth Congress of the International Society of Electrophysiology & Kinesiology, Brisbane, Australia, 19-21 July, 2012 (pp. 437-437). Brisbane, Australia
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Differences in the muscle activities in the forearm muscles in healthy men and women
2012 (English)In: Proceedings of the XIXth Congress of the International Society of Electrophysiology & Kinesiology / [ed] Kylie Tucker et al., Brisbane, Australia, 2012, p. 437-437Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Balance between flexor and extensor muscle activity is essential for optimal function. This has been demonstrated previously for the lower extremity, trunk and shoulder function, but information on the relationship in hand function is lacking. AIM: Was to evaluate whether there are qualitative differences in finger extension force(fef), grip force, force duration, force balance and the muscle activities in the forearm flexor and extensor muscles in healthy men and women in different ages. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Brisbane, Australia: , 2012
Keywords
sEMG, Force balance
National Category
Electrical Engineering, Electronic Engineering, Information Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-19865 (URN)978-0-646-58228-3 (ISBN)
Conference
XIXth Congress of the International Society of Electrophysiology & Kinesiology, Brisbane, Australia, 19-21 July, 2012
Available from: 2012-10-21 Created: 2012-10-21 Last updated: 2018-03-22Bibliographically approved
Parker, J., Olsson, C. & Brorsson, S. (2012). Grip force and muscle activity are associated with kinematics in the golf swing. Paper presented at ACSM's 59th Annual Meeting and 3rd World Congress on Exercise is Medicine, San Francisco, California, May 29 - June 2, 2012. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 44(Suppl. 2), 474-474
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Grip force and muscle activity are associated with kinematics in the golf swing
2012 (English)In: Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, ISSN 0195-9131, E-ISSN 1530-0315, Vol. 44, no Suppl. 2, p. 474-474Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2012
Keywords
Grip force, kinematics, golf
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-19581 (URN)000310363302710 ()
Conference
ACSM's 59th Annual Meeting and 3rd World Congress on Exercise is Medicine, San Francisco, California, May 29 - June 2, 2012
Available from: 2012-09-18 Created: 2012-09-12 Last updated: 2018-03-22Bibliographically approved
Projects
Interactive and patient-focused cancerrehabilitation [2011-02502_Vinnova]; Halmstad University
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications