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Wengelin, Åsa
Publications (10 of 17) Show all publications
Kjellman, C., Högdin, S., Tideman, M. & Wengelin, Å. (2012). Everyday life for young adults with intellectual disabilities in public and private spaces. Paper presented at 14th World Congress of the International Association for the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (IASSID), "A World of Potential", Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, July 9-14, 2012. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, 56(7-8), 810-810
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Everyday life for young adults with intellectual disabilities in public and private spaces
2012 (English)In: Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, ISSN 0964-2633, E-ISSN 1365-2788, Vol. 56, no 7-8, p. 810-810Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Inc., 2012
National Category
Ethnology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-35752 (URN)000305386000811 ()
Conference
14th World Congress of the International Association for the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (IASSID), "A World of Potential", Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, July 9-14, 2012
Available from: 2018-01-23 Created: 2018-01-23 Last updated: 2018-01-23Bibliographically approved
Asker-Arnason, L., Akerlund, V., Skoglund, C., Ek-Lagergren, I., Wengelin, Å. & Sahlen, B. (2012). Spoken and Written Narratives in Swedish Children and Adolescents With Hearing Impairment. Communication Disorders Quarterly, 33(3), 131-145
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Spoken and Written Narratives in Swedish Children and Adolescents With Hearing Impairment
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2012 (English)In: Communication Disorders Quarterly, ISSN 1525-7401, E-ISSN 1538-4837, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 131-145Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Twenty 10-to 18-year-old children and adolescents with varying degrees of hearing impairment (HI) and hearing aids (HA), ranging from mild-moderate to severe, produced picture-elicited narratives in a spoken and written version. Their performance was compared to that of 63 normally hearing (NH) peers within the same age span. The participants with HI and NH showed similar patterns regarding intragroup correlations between corresponding measures of spoken and written narratives. However, the participants with HI had significantly less diverse language than the NH group. The participants with poorer hearing (higher best ear hearing level [BEHL]) produced spoken and written narratives comprising more content words and they also produced written narratives that were less lexically diverse than the participants with better hearing (lower BEHL). The difference as to lexical skills emphasizes the importance of focusing on these skills in the group of children with HI. However, the results give support for a quite optimistic view on the development of narration in children with HI with HA, at least for picture-elicited narratives.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2012
Keywords
language, hearing impairment, narratives, vocabulary, writing assessment
National Category
General Language Studies and Linguistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-35461 (URN)10.1177/1525740111401906 (DOI)000317618300001 ()2-s2.0-84859014556 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-11-22 Created: 2017-11-22 Last updated: 2018-03-23Bibliographically approved
Wengelin, Å. (2011). The disabling state of an active society [Review]. Disability & Society, 26(3), 381-383
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The disabling state of an active society
2011 (English)In: Disability & Society, ISSN 0968-7599, E-ISSN 1360-0508, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 381-383Article, book review (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Taylor & Francis, 2011
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-18885 (URN)10.1080/09687599.2011.560423 (DOI)000289844500014 ()
Available from: 2012-06-27 Created: 2012-06-25 Last updated: 2018-03-22Bibliographically approved
Behrns, I., Ahlsén, E. & Wengelin, Å. (2010). Aphasia and text writing. International journal of language and communication disorders, 45(2), 230-243
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Aphasia and text writing
2010 (English)In: International journal of language and communication disorders, ISSN 1368-2822, E-ISSN 1460-6984, Vol. 45, no 2, p. 230-243Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background:

Good writing skills are needed in almost every aspect of life today, and there is a growing interest in research into acquired writing difficulties. Most of the findings reported so far, however, are based on words produced in isolation. The present study deals with the production of entire texts.

Aims:

The aim was to characterize written narratives produced by a group of participants with aphasia.

Methods & Procedures:

Eight persons aged 28–63 years with aphasia took part in the study. They were compared with a reference group consisting of ten participants aged 21–30 years. All participants were asked to write a personal narrative titled ‘I have never been so afraid’ and to perform a picture-based story-generation task called the ‘Frog Story’. The texts were written on a computer.

Outcome & Results:

The group could be divided into participants with low, moderate, and high general performance, respectively. The texts written by the participants in the group with moderate and high writing performance had comparatively good narrative structure despite indications of difficulties on other linguistic levels.

Conclusions & Implications:

Aphasia appeared to influence text writing on different linguistic levels. The impact on overall structure and coherence was in line with earlier findings from the analysis of spoken and written discourse and the implication of this is that the written modality should also be included in language rehabilitation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York, NY: John Wiley & Sons, 2010
Keywords
Aphasia, Text writing, Word-level errors, Text structure, Coherence
National Category
General Language Studies and Linguistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-5791 (URN)10.3109/13682820902936425 (DOI)000274879000008 ()22748034 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-76749118120 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2010-09-15 Created: 2010-09-15 Last updated: 2018-03-23Bibliographically approved
Johansson, R., Wengelin, Å., Johansson, V. & Holmqvist, K. (2010). Looking at the keyboard or the monitor: relationship with text production processes. Reading and writing, 23(7), 835-851
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Looking at the keyboard or the monitor: relationship with text production processes
2010 (English)In: Reading and writing, ISSN 0922-4777, E-ISSN 1573-0905, Vol. 23, no 7, p. 835-851Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this paper we explored text production differences in an expository text production task between writers who looked mainly at the keyboard and writers who looked mainly at the monitor. Eye-tracking technology and keystroke-logging were combined to systematically describe and define these two groups in respect of the complex interplay between text production and the reading of one's own emerging text. Findings showed that monitor gazers typed significantly faster and were more productive writers. They also read their own text more, and they frequently read in parallel with writing. Analysis of fixation durations suggests that more cognitive processing is in use during reading in parallel with writing than during reading in pauses. Keyboard gazers used the left and right cursor keys significantly more. We suggest that this is because they revised their texts in a much more serial mode than monitor gazers. Finally, analysis of the characteristics of the final texts showed no differences between the groups.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Netherlands, 2010
Keywords
eye-tracking, keystroke-logging, reading during writing, typing, visual attention
National Category
Specific Languages
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-5892 (URN)10.1007/s11145-009-9189-3 (DOI)000279840900005 ()22017587 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-77954541383 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2010-09-21 Created: 2010-09-21 Last updated: 2018-03-23Bibliographically approved
Asker-Árnason, L., Ibertsson, T., Wass, M., Wengelin, Å. & Sahlén, B. (2010). Picture-elicited written narratives, process and product, in 18 children with cochlear implants. Communication Disorders Quarterly, 31(4), 195-212
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Picture-elicited written narratives, process and product, in 18 children with cochlear implants
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2010 (English)In: Communication Disorders Quarterly, ISSN 1525-7401, E-ISSN 1538-4837, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 195-212Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The purpose of the study was to explore the narrative writing of 18 children, ages 11 to 19, with severe and profound hearing impairment who had cochlear implants (CI), compared with the performance of hearing children. Nine of the 18 children had prelingual deafness and 9 children had postlingual deafness. The hearing impairment was progressive in 11 children. The participants thus formed a heterogeneous group, which was split in two ways: according to age at testing and age at implantation. The narratives were collected by means of keystroke logging. The difference between the children with CI and the hearing children was most prominent for two measures: the percentage of pause time (in the group of children older than 13 years) and lexical density. Furthermore, the children implanted after 5 years of age performed more like the hearing children. This group consisted of children with postlingual deafness and also of children who were deafened progressively. Our interpretation is that these children benefited from the early linguistic input. Taking the whole group of participants into consideration, the results reflect linguistic and cognitive processing limitations in complex linguistic tasks like narration for the children with CI in comparison with their hearing peers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Austin, TX: PRO-ED, 2010
Keywords
cochlear implants, narrative, writing, keystroke logging, lexical density, pause time
National Category
General Language Studies and Linguistics Otorhinolaryngology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-5788 (URN)10.1177/1525740109337734 (DOI)2-s2.0-77955344260 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2010-09-15 Created: 2010-09-15 Last updated: 2018-03-23Bibliographically approved
Wengelin, Å., Leijten, M. & Van Waes, L. (2010). Studying reading during writing: new perspectives in research. Reading and writing, 23(7), 735-742
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Studying reading during writing: new perspectives in research
2010 (English)In: Reading and writing, ISSN 0922-4777, E-ISSN 1573-0905, Vol. 23, no 7, p. 735-742Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Netherlands, 2010
Keywords
eye-movements, comprehension, text
National Category
Specific Languages
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-5894 (URN)10.1007/s11145-009-9187-5 (DOI)000279840900001 ()2-s2.0-77954542017 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2010-09-21 Created: 2010-09-21 Last updated: 2018-03-23Bibliographically approved
Torrance, M. & Wengelin, Å. (2010). Writers' eye movements. In: C. Bazerman, R. Krut, K. Lunsford, S. McLeod, S. Null, P. Rogers & A. Stansell (Ed.), Traditions of writing research (pp. 394-405). New York: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Writers' eye movements
2010 (English)In: Traditions of writing research / [ed] C. Bazerman, R. Krut, K. Lunsford, S. McLeod, S. Null, P. Rogers & A. Stansell, New York: Routledge, 2010, p. 394-405Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Routledge, 2010
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-5896 (URN)9780415993371 (ISBN)9780415993388 (ISBN)9780203892329 (ISBN)
Note

Papers presented at the 2008 WRAB conference.

Available from: 2010-09-21 Created: 2010-09-21 Last updated: 2018-03-23Bibliographically approved
Behrns, I., Wengelin, Å., Broberg, M. & Hartelius, L. (2009). A comparison between written and spoken narratives in aphasia. Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, 23(7), 507-528
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A comparison between written and spoken narratives in aphasia
2009 (English)In: Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, ISSN 0269-9206, E-ISSN 1464-5076, Vol. 23, no 7, p. 507-528Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of the present study was to explore how a personal narrative told by a group of eight persons with aphasia differed between written and spoken language, and to compare this with findings from 10 participants in a reference group. The stories were analysed through holistic assessments made by 60 participants without experience of aphasia and through measurement of lexical and syntactic variables. The findings showed that the participants with aphasia generally received lower ratings than the reference group, but also that stories written by participants with aphasia were rated as easier to understand, more interesting, and more coherent than the group’s spoken stories. Regression analysis showed that syntax could predict several of the rated variables for the stories told by the participants with aphasia. Results point to the need to include writing training in language rehabilitation in order to increase the ability for persons with aphasia to participate in communicative situations in everyday life.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Taylor & Francis, 2009
Keywords
Adult, Analysis of variance, Aphasia, Brain damage, Clinical article, Comprehension, Controlled study, Emotions, Female, Human, Interpersonal communication, Language, Linguistics, Male, Mental processes, Middle aged, Narrative, Prediction, Regression analysis, Speech, Spoken language, Untrained raters, Writing, Written language
National Category
General Language Studies and Linguistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-5891 (URN)10.1080/02699200902916129 (DOI)000267766600003 ()19585311 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-68449094347 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2010-09-21 Created: 2010-09-21 Last updated: 2018-03-23Bibliographically approved
Behrns, I., Hartelius, L. & Wengelin, Å. (2009). Aphasia and Computerised Writing Aid Supported Treatment. Aphasiology, 23(10), 1276-1294
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Aphasia and Computerised Writing Aid Supported Treatment
2009 (English)In: Aphasiology, ISSN 0268-7038, E-ISSN 1464-5041, Vol. 23, no 10, p. 1276-1294Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background:

Individuals with aphasia often experience difficulties in writing. Word processors with a spell checker and a grammar checker can compensate for some of the writing difficulties associated with aphasia.

Aims:

To determine if writing difficulties associated with aphasia may be reduced by the use of a computerised writing aid when training patients.

Methods & Procedures:

The writing aids used in this study were originally designed specifically for persons with developmental reading and writing difficulties and are based on statistics of frequent misspellings and phonotactic rules. Three participants with aphasia selected one of two offered writing aids. Written production during treatment and evaluation was recorded and analysed by keystroke logging. The study had a single-subject ABA design replicated across three participants. The baseline (A) was established by measuring four dependent variables. During a 9-week intervention phase (B) the dependent variables were measured once a week. A follow-up (A) was done 10 months after the training was finished. The dependent variables were: total number of words in a writing task; proportion of correctly written words; words per minute; proportion of successful edits. The results were analysed both visually and by statistical calculations.

Outcomes & Results:

All participants experienced a positive improvement in their writing ability. Results showed individual differences; after completed training the first participant made more successful edits, the second wrote more words, had a larger proportion of correctly written words, and made more successful edits. The third participant's results did not show any improvement that could be statistically supported.

Conclusions:

This study showed that the computerised training facilitated the generating process and made the revision process more efficient for the participants. The results are important in that they indicate possible ways of designing writing treatment. However, they also show the need for careful analyses when evaluating different treatment strategies and in discussing what improved writing ability may be.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Psychology Press, 2009
Keywords
Aphasia, Writing process, Writing difficulties, Computerised writing, Aids, Treatment, Keystroke logging
National Category
General Language Studies and Linguistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-5790 (URN)10.1080/02687030802436892 (DOI)000269542400005 ()2-s2.0-70349133098 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2010-09-15 Created: 2010-09-15 Last updated: 2018-03-23Bibliographically approved
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