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Smith, B. D., Villalobos-Jiménez, G., Perron, M. A., Sahlén, G., Assandri, G., Vilenica, M., . . . Bried, J. T. (2023). Odonata assemblages in human-modified landscapes (2ed.). In: Alex Córdoba-Aguilar; Christopher D. Beatty; Jason T. Bried (Ed.), Dragonflies and Damselflies: Model Organisms for Ecological and Evolutionary Research (pp. 247-260). Oxford: Oxford University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Odonata assemblages in human-modified landscapes
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2023 (English)In: Dragonflies and Damselflies: Model Organisms for Ecological and Evolutionary Research / [ed] Alex Córdoba-Aguilar; Christopher D. Beatty; Jason T. Bried, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2023, 2, p. 247-260Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Human activities such as logging, agriculture, and urbanization can drastically change and limit Odonata species distributions in aquatic and terrestrial environments. These modifications may culminate in extirpations of rare and resident species and homogenization of community composition across space. This chapter reviews how human land use is (re)shaping odonate assemblages and focuses on the impacts from logging, agriculture, and urbanization. Deeper appreciation and analysis of regulatory mechanisms (e.g. vulnerability traits, species interactions, phylogenetic niche conservatism) and background “noise” (e.g. natural heterogeneity, climate change, historical context) will be important in understanding and predicting odonate community responses to ongoing and future landscape alteration.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2023 Edition: 2
Keywords
agricultural land use, changing landscapes, ecological traps, historical landscapes, logging, reservoirs, secondary habitat, urban heat islands, urbanization
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-48905 (URN)10.1093/oso/9780192898623.003.0018 (DOI)9780192898623 (ISBN)9780191924903 (ISBN)
Available from: 2022-12-12 Created: 2022-12-12 Last updated: 2023-02-24Bibliographically approved
Pires, M. M., Sahlén, G. & Périco, E. (2022). Agricultural land use affects the heterogeneity of Odonata communities in the Brazilian Pampa. Journal of Insect Conservation, 26(3), 503-514
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Agricultural land use affects the heterogeneity of Odonata communities in the Brazilian Pampa
2022 (English)In: Journal of Insect Conservation, ISSN 1366-638X, E-ISSN 1572-9753, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 503-514Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Farming expansion has negative impacts on freshwater biodiversity. However, the efects of agricultural land use are not similar across taxa and depend on local context. For instance, the impacts of agricultural expansion are understudied in the Neotropics (one of the leading regions in cropland expansion). Knowledge of the effects of agricultural land use on aquatic insects from South American subtropical grasslands (Pampa) is even more incipient. We tested whether landscape modification related to increased agricultural land use was associated with taxonomic homogenization in odonate communities in waterbodies in the Brazilian Pampa. Odonates were collected in waterbodies differing in the main land-use class in their surroundings (cropland or grassland). Cropland and grassland sites differed with respect to their abiotic conditions (water chemistry) and species composition of Odonata. Additionally, we found higher variation in the composition of Odonata (and suborders Anisoptera and Zygoptera separately) in grassland than cropland sites. We found an interplay between agricultural and grassland land uses and the variation in the composition of odonate communities in the Brazilian Pampa. Specifically, landscape modification by agriculture modified the abiotic conditions in the waterbodies, which may have favored species able to establish as larvae under harsher environmental conditions. 

Implications for insect conservation: We suggest that the maintenance of mixed-grassland and cropland land uses in the fields adjacent to waterbodies can limit the negative effects of agricultural encroachment on Odonata communities with respect to biotic homogenization in the Brazilian Pampa. © 2021, The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Nature Switzerland AG.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Dordrecht: Springer Netherlands, 2022
Keywords
Agricultural encroachment, Aquatic insects, Beta diversity, Biotic homogenization, Dragonfly, Subtropical grasslands
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-45614 (URN)10.1007/s10841-021-00349-0 (DOI)000696774700001 ()2-s2.0-85115111934 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding: CAPES (Process #88887.125260/2015-00; PVE 95/2015) & CNPq (Process #307303/2019-5)

Available from: 2021-09-20 Created: 2021-09-20 Last updated: 2022-08-24Bibliographically approved
Ribeiro, C., Rodrigues, M. E., Sahlén, G. & de Oliveira Roque, F. (2022). Dragonflies within and outside a protected area: a comparison revealing the role of well-preserved atlantic forests in the preservation of critically endangered, phytotelmatous species. Journal of Insect Conservation, 26, 271-282
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dragonflies within and outside a protected area: a comparison revealing the role of well-preserved atlantic forests in the preservation of critically endangered, phytotelmatous species
2022 (English)In: Journal of Insect Conservation, ISSN 1366-638X, E-ISSN 1572-9753, Vol. 26, p. 271-282Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Understanding the interactions between protected areas and the surrounding landscape has become a central issue to conservation of biodiversity. The important role of protected areas in the preservation of biodiversity in tropical hotpots is widely recognized, but the role of the landscape surrounding those hotspots is poorly understood, particularly with regard to insects. In this study, we evaluated the species richness, composition, and beta diversity of Odonata assemblages inside and in the surroundings of a protected area in the Atlantic Forest hotspot. Sampling was carried out in the Private Reserve of Natural Heritage Veracel Station and its surroundings in the southern region of Bahia. Forty sites were sampled, 22 within the reserve and 18 in the surrounding areas. We found both a greater total species richness, and a greater richness with regard to the suborder Anisoptera in the surrounding areas. In addition, the species composition differed less between the sampling sites inside the protected area. Some of the species found inside the protected area did, however, make a greater contribution of the individual species to beta diversity (SCDB). Our study suggests that the surroundings of a protected area can contribute to the maintenance of regional diversity of dragonflies, but the protected areas play a vital role in supporting critically endangered species and populations of forest specialists, e.g., phytotelmatous species. Implications for insect conservation: Our results show that the composition of the odonate species assemblages may provide a means to assess the importance of protected areas to Odonata communities. Our study also highlights the importance of PAs to the maintenance of the regional Odonata species pool, especially to forest specialist species and to threatened species. © 2022, The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Nature Switzerland AG.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Dordrecht: Springer Netherlands, 2022
Keywords
Aquatic insects, Bioindicators, Conservation Unit, Damselfly, Native vegetation
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-46491 (URN)10.1007/s10841-022-00385-4 (DOI)000759033600001 ()2-s2.0-85124820582 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding: This research has financed from Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz—UESC, project registered for Number 0220.1100.1693. And also, by National Council for Scientific and Technological Development—CNPQ, process Number 423737/2018–0.

Available from: 2022-03-18 Created: 2022-03-18 Last updated: 2022-04-08Bibliographically approved
Ware, J., Kohli, M. K., Mendoza, C. M., Troast, D., Jinguji, H., Hobson, K. A., . . . Suhling, F. (2022). Evidence for widespread gene flow and migration in the Globe Skimmer dragonfly Pantala flavescens. International Journal of Odonatology, 25, 43-55
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evidence for widespread gene flow and migration in the Globe Skimmer dragonfly Pantala flavescens
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2022 (English)In: International Journal of Odonatology, ISSN 1388-7890, Vol. 25, p. 43-55Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The global population structure and dispersal patterns of Pantala flavescens (Fabricius, 1798) are evaluated using a geographically extensive mitochondrial DNA dataset, a more limited samples of nuclear markers, wing isotopic (δ²H) data and a literature review. No spatial or temporal haplotype structure was recovered between the samples. Isotope data suggest that most samples were immigrants at the collection locations. A literature review of migration events for the species confirms regular inter-and intra-continental migrations occur (the majority reported from Asia, Africa and Australasia), with individuals and swarms dispersing thousands of kilometers over land and oceans. Migrations coincide with prevailing winds and seasonal rains, which points to a mechanism we name the “pantropical Pantala conveyor belt”, suggesting widespread gene flow is possible for an aquatic insect with excellent flying ability linked to rapid larval development.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Kiel: Wachholtz Verlag, 2022
Keywords
Odonata, deuterium, haplotype, isoscape, FST, migration, ΦPT
National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-46478 (URN)000997711800001 ()
Note

Funding: Ware would like to acknowledge funding from NSF DBI #1564386.

Available from: 2022-03-16 Created: 2022-03-16 Last updated: 2023-12-12Bibliographically approved
Renner, S., Périco, E., Dalzochio, M. S. & Sahlén, G. (2022). The balance of common vs. rare: a study of dragonfly (Insecta: Odonata) assemblages in the Brazilian Pampa biome. Neotropical Biodiversity, 8(1), 188-199
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The balance of common vs. rare: a study of dragonfly (Insecta: Odonata) assemblages in the Brazilian Pampa biome
2022 (English)In: Neotropical Biodiversity, E-ISSN 2376-6808, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 188-199Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We surveyed dragonflies (Odonata) at 87 sites in the anthropologically modified Pampa biome of southern Brazil to evaluate how regionally rare and common species form species assemblages in habitats with different water physiochemistry, habitat structures, and other environmental variables. We classified 9 out of the 90 species encountered as regionally common and 59 as regionally rare. A discriminant analysis confirmed that localities with only a few common species were characteristic in the set of rare species present, while localities housing more common species showed no clear pattern. A PCA revealed that a subset of the common species were strongly positively associated with water temperature, turbidity, dissolved O2 and pH but negatively associated with desertification. In contrast, rare species were positively associated with grassland habitat, but negatively with agriculture, salinity, and conductivity. In general, the associations of the rare species were weaker than those of common species. Finally, a correlation suggested that sites with six or more common species present had a reduced number of rare species compared to sites with fewer common species. It is possible that common species reduce the available niche space for weaker competitors among the rare species. We conclude that the original species assemblages in the biome may have been species poor with few regionally common species. Current anthropogenic change has increased the number of common species, which in turn has negative effects on the survival possibilities of rare species. © 2022 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Abingdon: Taylor & Francis, 2022
Keywords
Odonata; dragonfly, commonness, competition, Neotropics
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-48417 (URN)10.1080/23766808.2022.2071405 (DOI)000792933600001 ()2-s2.0-85132616057 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding: UNIVATES

Available from: 2022-10-12 Created: 2022-10-12 Last updated: 2023-01-17Bibliographically approved
Kohli, M., Djernaes, M., Sanchez Herrera, M., Sahlén, G., Pilgrim, E., Simonsen, T. J., . . . Ware, J. (2021). Comparative phylogeography uncovers evolutionary past of Holarctic dragonflies. PeerJ, 9, Article ID 11338.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comparative phylogeography uncovers evolutionary past of Holarctic dragonflies
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2021 (English)In: PeerJ, E-ISSN 2167-8359, Vol. 9, article id 11338Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Here, we investigate the evolutionary history of five northern dragonfly species to evaluate what role the last glaciation period may have played in their current distributions. We look at the population structure and estimate divergence times for populations of the following species: Aeshna juncea (Linnaeus), Aeshna subarctica Walker, Sympetrum danae (Sulzer), Libellula quadrimaculata Linnaeus and Somatochlora sahlbergi Trybom across their Holarctic range. Our results suggest a common phylogeographic pattern across all species except for S. sahlbergi. First, we find that North American and European populations are genetically distinct and have perhaps been separated for more than 400,000 years. Second, our data suggests that, based on genetics, populations from the Greater Beringian region (Beringia, Japan and China) have haplotypes that cluster with North America or Europe depending on the species rather than having a shared geographic affinity. This is perhaps a result of fluctuating sea levels and ice sheet coverage during the Quaternary period that influenced dispersal routes and refugia. Indeed, glacial Beringia may have been as much a transit zone as a refugia for dragonflies. Somatochlora sahlbergi shows no genetic variation across its range and therefore does not share the geographic patterns found in the other circumboreal dragonflies studied here. Lastly, we discuss the taxonomic status of Sympetrum danae, which our results indicate is a species complex comprising two species, one found in Eurasia through Beringia, and the other in North America east and south of Beringia. Through this study we present a shared history among different species from different families of dragonflies, which are influenced by the climatic fluctuations of the past. Copyright 2021 Kohli et al.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: PeerJ, Ltd., 2021
Keywords
Dragonflies, Phylogeography, Holarctic, Aeshna, Somatochlora, Circumboreal, Sympetrum, Libellula, Beringia
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-45288 (URN)10.7717/peerj.11338 (DOI)000665117300001 ()2-s2.0-85108798110 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding: Manpreet Kohli received funding from the Systematic Research Fund, 2017 funded by Linnaean Society of London. Manpreet Kohli also received funds from Theodore Roosevelt Memorial Fund, 2017 funded American Museum of Natural History. Thomas J Simonsen, Marie Djernæs and Kent Olsen received funding from the research fund under the Danish Ministry for Culture (grant: FORM.2015-0023), 15 June Foundation (grant: 2015-A-89), The SYNTHESYS program under the EU Commission (grant: SE-TAF-5543). Jessica Ware received funding from National Science Foundation grant #1564386.

Available from: 2021-07-08 Created: 2021-07-08 Last updated: 2023-12-15Bibliographically approved
Pires, M. M., Ely Júnior, G. L., Schmidt Dalzochio, M., Sahlén, G. & Périco, E. (2021). Intraspecific Morphological Variation in the Dragonfly Erythrodiplax Media (Odonata: Libellulidae) Among South American Grassland Physiognomies. Neotropical Entomology, 50(5), 736-747
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Intraspecific Morphological Variation in the Dragonfly Erythrodiplax Media (Odonata: Libellulidae) Among South American Grassland Physiognomies
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2021 (English)In: Neotropical Entomology, ISSN 1519-566X, E-ISSN 1678-8052, Vol. 50, no 5, p. 736-747Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We assessed the intraspecific morphological variation in Erythrodiplax media Borror 1942 (Odonata, Libellulidae) among grassland physiognomies (“Coastal,”“Highland,” and “Steppic”) in the South Brazilian Campos. We measured six morpholog-ical traits (total body length, thorax height, length, and width of the fore- and hindwings) from 90 specimens (60 males and 45 females). We tested the effect of the grassland type on the set of traits using one-way MANOVA and principal component analysis (PCA) (separately for each sex). Grassland physiognomy affected the morphology of males and females. In both sexes, the PCA mostly opposed the specimens of the Coastal from the Highland and Steppic grasslands. The first PCA axis separated specimens according to body lengths, thorax heights, and wing width, while the second PCA axis opposed specimens according to wing length and thorax height from specimens with broader wings and longer body lengths. Males from the Coastal had longer body lengths and shorter thorax heights than Highland and Steppic grasslands, while males from the Steppic had longer fore- and hindwings than specimens from the Coastal and Highland grasslands. Females from the Coastal had significantly shorter forewings than specimens from the Steppic grasslands and shorter hindwings than Highland grasslands. Our results are likely explained by the differences in climate and habitat complexity among grassland types and indicate that the processes driving odonate performance vary among grassland biotopes. This study potentially indicates that dragonflies are sensitive to changes in the vegetation structure in South American subtropical grasslands. © 2021, Sociedade Entomológica do Brasil.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Dordrecht: Springer Netherlands, 2021
Keywords
Anisoptera, body size, habitat structure, morphology, Odonata, South Brazilian Campos
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-45289 (URN)10.1007/s13744-021-00890-2 (DOI)000670141900001 ()2-s2.0-85109295893 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding: CAPES (Process #88887.125260/2015-00; PVE 95/2015) and CNPq (Process #307303/2019-5)

Available from: 2021-07-08 Created: 2021-07-08 Last updated: 2021-09-27Bibliographically approved
Renner, S., Schmidt Dalzochio, M., Périco, E., Sahlén, G. & Suhonen, J. (2020). Odonate species occupancy frequency distribution and abundance–occupancy relationship patterns intemporal and permanent water bodies in a subtropical area. Ecology and Evolution, 10(14), 7525-7536
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Odonate species occupancy frequency distribution and abundance–occupancy relationship patterns intemporal and permanent water bodies in a subtropical area
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2020 (English)In: Ecology and Evolution, E-ISSN 2045-7758, Vol. 10, no 14, p. 7525-7536Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Abstract

This paper investigates species richness and species occupancy frequency distributions (SOFD) as well as patterns of abundance–occupancy relationship (SAOR) in Odonata (dragonflies and damselflies) in a subtropical area. A total of 82 species and 1983 individuals were noted from 73 permanent and temporal water bodies (lakes and ponds) in the Pampa biome in southern Brazil. Odonate species occupancy ranged from 1 to 54. There were few widely distributed generalist species and several specialist species with a restricted distribution. About 70% of the species occurred in <10% of the water bodies, yielding a surprisingly high number of rare species, often making up the majority of the communities. No difference in species richness was found between temporal and permanent water bodies. Both temporal and permanent water bodies had odonate assemblages that fitted best with the unimodal satellite SOFD pattern. It seems that unimodal satellite SOFD pattern frequently occurred in the aquatic habitats. The SAOR pattern was positive and did not differ between permanent and temporal water bodies. Our results are consistent with a niche‐based model rather than a metapopulation dynamic model.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford: John Wiley & Sons, 2020
Keywords
core–satellite species patterns, damselfly, dragonfly, neotropics, SAOR patterns, SOFD patterns
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-42898 (URN)10.1002/ece3.6478 (DOI)000548018000001 ()32760546 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85087133735 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding: This study was financed by Capes (Coordenação de Aperfeiçoamento de Pessoal de Nível Superior) via a doctoral fellowship to SR and the Science Without Borders Program through a PVE between Univates and Halmstad University (88881.068147/2014-01) and by CNPq (Conselho Nacional de Pesquisa) via a Post-doc fellowship to MSD.

Available from: 2020-07-30 Created: 2020-07-30 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Schmidt Dalzochio, M., Périco, E. P., Dametto, N. & Sahlén, G. (2020). Rapid functional traits turnover in boreal dragonfly communities (Odonata). Scientific Reports, 10(1), Article ID 15411.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Rapid functional traits turnover in boreal dragonfly communities (Odonata)
2020 (English)In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 10, no 1, article id 15411Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

All natural populations show fluctuations in space or time. This is fundamental for the maintenance of biodiversity, as it allows species to coexist. Long-term ecological studies are rare, mainly due to logistics, but studies like the one presented below recognize the dimensionality of temporal change and the ecological processes that lead to shifts in community composition over time. Here, we used three sampling occasions from a dataset spanning 20 years where dragonflies in central Sweden were monitored. Our aim was to investigate how the prevalence of ecological and biological species traits varied over time measured as Community-level Weighted Means of trait values (CWM). Most CWM values varied significantly between years. Most of the traits changed between the second and the last sampling occasion, but not between the two first ones. These changes could be linked to major changes in species abundance. Our work indicates that fundamental shifts in community structure can occur over a short time, providing environmental drivers act on species turnover. In our case, Climate change and pH levels in lakes are most likely the most important factors. © The Author(s) 2020

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Nature Publishing Group, 2020
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-43164 (URN)10.1038/s41598-020-71685-5 (DOI)000573765900025 ()2-s2.0-85091291011 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Environmental Protection Agency
Note

Funding: Open Access funding provided by Halmstad University Library.

Available from: 2020-09-22 Created: 2020-09-22 Last updated: 2022-09-15Bibliographically approved
Bried, J., Ries, L. & Sahlén, G. (2020). Towards Global Volunteer Monitoring of Odonate Abundance. BioScience, 70(10), 914-923
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Towards Global Volunteer Monitoring of Odonate Abundance
2020 (English)In: BioScience, ISSN 0006-3568, E-ISSN 1525-3244, Vol. 70, no 10, p. 914-923Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Insects are reportedly experiencing widespread declines, but we generally have sparse data on their abundance. Correcting this shortfall will take more effort than professional entomologists alone can manage. Volunteer nature enthusiasts can greatly help to monitor the abundance of dragonflies and damselflies (Odonata), iconic freshwater sentinels and one of the few nonpollinator insect groups appreciated by the public and amenable to citizen science. Although counting individual odonates is common in some locations, current data will not enable a global perspective on odonate abundance patterns and trends. Borrowing insight from butterfly monitoring efforts, we outline basic plans for a global volunteer network to count odonates, including organizational structure, advertising and recruiting, and data collection, submission, and synthesis. We hope our proposal serves as a catalyst for richer coordinated efforts to understand population trends of odonates and other insects in the Anthropocene. © The Author(s) 2020. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Institute of Biological Sciences.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cary, NC: Oxford University Press, 2020
Keywords
citizen science, community science, Odonata, insect declines, Prestonian shortfall
National Category
Other Biological Topics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-43173 (URN)10.1093/biosci/biaa092 (DOI)2-s2.0-85096314081 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-09-23 Created: 2020-09-23 Last updated: 2020-12-03Bibliographically approved
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Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-7840-6460

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