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Arnarsson, A., Nygren, J., Nyholm, M., Torsheim, T., Augustine, L., Bjereld, Y., . . . Bendtsen, P. (2019). Cyberbullying and traditional bullying among Nordic adolescents and their impact on life satisfaction. Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, 1-9
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cyberbullying and traditional bullying among Nordic adolescents and their impact on life satisfaction
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2019 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Aims: The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of cybervictimization in the six Nordic countries and to assess its overlap with traditional bullying. A further aim was to examine potential associations between life satisfaction, on the one hand, and traditional bullying and cyberbullying on the other. Methods: Analyses were based on data from the 2013⁄2014 Health Behaviour in School-aged Children study. It included 32,210 boys and girls, aged 11, 13, and 15, living in the six Nordic countries. Results: The prevalence of cyberbullying by both pictures and by messages was around 2% in all the Nordic countries except Greenland. There it was considerably higher. The prevalence of being bullied in a traditional manner varied widely by country. For boys, this type of bullying was most frequent in the youngest age group and then decreased steadily in the older age groups. Girls were on average more likely to be cyberbullied. Cyberbullying was more common among 13- and 15-year-olds than 11-year-olds. Higher family affluence was unrelated to the risk of cyberbullying. However, it was related to traditional bullying and combined forms of bullying. Compared with intact families, cybervictimization was commoner among single-parent families and stepfamilies. Adjusting for age, gender, family affluence, and family structure, those subjected to cyberbullying had lower life satisfaction than those who were not bullied. Conclusions: We found relatively little overlap between cyberbullying and traditional bullying, indicating that the two may be separate phenomena stemming from different mechanisms, at least in the Nordic context.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Sage Publications, 2019
Keywords
Bullying, cyberbullying, Nordic, adolescents, life satisfaction, family structure, family affluence
National Category
Other Medical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-38833 (URN)10.1177/1403494818817411 (DOI)30672390 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85060714783 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-02-04 Created: 2019-02-04 Last updated: 2020-03-20Bibliographically approved
Ahlborg, M., Svedberg, P., Nyholm, M., Morgan, A. & Nygren, J. M. (2019). Into the realm of social capital for adolescents: A latent profile analysis. PLoS ONE, 14(2), Article ID e0212564.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Into the realm of social capital for adolescents: A latent profile analysis
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2019 (English)In: PLoS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 14, no 2, article id e0212564Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Recent reports of increasing prevalence of frequent health complaints and mental health problems among adolescents call for directing more attention on determinants of adolescent health. The relationship between health and social capital has gained increased attention since the early 2000’s and research at review level confirms the importance of social capital for health outcomes, despite methodological heterogeneity. The aim of this study was to identify distinct profiles of family, school and peer social capital in a nationally representative sample of adolescents and to explore health outcomes in those profiles.

Method

Cross-sectional data from the Swedish Health Behaviour of School-aged Children 2013/14 was used for this study. The analytical sample consisted of 7,804 adolescents aged 11-, 13- and 15-years. Items representing sense of belonging and emotional support were assessed in three contexts; family, school and among peers. Latent profile analyses (LPA) were run to determine social capital profiles. Health outcomes included frequent health complaints and life satisfaction, while socioeconomic status and genders were included as predictors.

Results

The results show that five distinct profiles best represent the data for 11- and 15-year olds, while a four-profile model was optimal for 13-year olds. Some profiles were recurrent between age groups but unique profiles were also found. Health outcomes were significantly different between profiles depending on levels of social capital in the different contexts.

Conclusions

This study provides novel insight into how social capital co-occurs among adolescents within the contexts of family, school and peers and how this translates into differences in health outcomes. The national representativeness of the sample increases the implications of the results and contributes to meaningful insights that help explain the interactions of social capital in multiple contexts, complementing what is previously known about the relationship with adolescent health. © 2019 Ahlborg et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
San Francisco, CA: Public Library of Science, 2019
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-39476 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0212564 (DOI)000459330800040 ()30789947 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85061940871 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Knowledge Foundation
Available from: 2019-05-26 Created: 2019-05-26 Last updated: 2020-04-29Bibliographically approved
Häggström Westberg, K., Wilhsson, M., Svedberg, P., Nygren, J. M., Morgan, A. & Nyholm, M. (2019). Optimism as a Candidate Health Asset: Exploring Its Links with Adolescent Quality of Life in Sweden. Child Development, 90(3), 970-984
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Optimism as a Candidate Health Asset: Exploring Its Links with Adolescent Quality of Life in Sweden
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2019 (English)In: Child Development, ISSN 0009-3920, E-ISSN 1467-8624, Vol. 90, no 3, p. 970-984Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study aims to understand the role that optimism could play in the context of a health asset approach to promote adolescent health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Adolescents (n = 948), between 11 and 16 years old from a medium-sized rural town in Sweden, answered questionnaires measuring optimism, pessimism, and HRQOL. The findings indicate a significant decrease in optimism and a significant increase in pessimism between early and mid adolescence. The study has allowed us to present associational evidence of the links between optimism and HRQOL. This infers the potential of an optimistic orientation about the future to function as a health asset during adolescence and by implication may provide additional intervention tools in the planning of health promotion strategies. © 2017 The Authors

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hoboken: Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Inc., 2019
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-35034 (URN)10.1111/cdev.12958 (DOI)000477640100026 ()28922470 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85065044168 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-09-20 Created: 2017-09-20 Last updated: 2020-04-29Bibliographically approved
Torsheim, T., Nygren, J. M., Rasmussen, M., Arnarsson, A. M., Bendtsen, P., Schnohr, C. W., . . . Nyholm, M. (2018). Social inequalities in self-rated health: A comparative cross-national study among 32,560 Nordic adolescents. Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, 46(1), 150-156
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Social inequalities in self-rated health: A comparative cross-national study among 32,560 Nordic adolescents
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2018 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 46, no 1, p. 150-156Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIMS: We aimed to estimate the magnitude of socioeconomic inequality in self-rated health among Nordic adolescents (aged 11, 13 and 15 years) using the Family Affluence Scale (a composite measure of material assets) and perceived family wealth as indicators of socioeconomic status.

METHODS: Data were collected from the Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) survey in 2013-2014. A sample of 32,560 adolescents from Denmark, Norway, Finland, Iceland, Greenland and Sweden was included in the study. Age-adjusted regression analyses were used to estimate associations between fair or poor self-rated health and the ridit scores for family affluence and perceived wealth.

RESULTS: The pooled relative index of inequality of 2.10 indicates that the risk of fair or poor health was about twice as high for young people with the lowest family affluence relative to those with the highest family affluence. The relative index of inequality for observed family affluence was highest in Denmark and lowest in Norway. For perceived family wealth, the pooled relative index of inequality of 3.99 indicates that the risk of fair or poor health was about four times as high for young people with the lowest perceived family wealth relative to those with the highest perceived family wealth. The relative index of inequality for perceived family wealth was highest in Iceland and lowest in Greenland.

CONCLUSIONS: Social inequality in self-rated health among adolescents was found to be robust across subjective and objective indicators of family affluence in the Nordic welfare states. © Author(s) 2017

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Sage Publications, 2018
Keywords
Adolescents, Family Affluence Scale, Health Behaviour in School-aged Children, Nordic region, comparative study, perceived socioeconomic status, self-rated health
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-35368 (URN)10.1177/1403494817734733 (DOI)000428758000020 ()29039236 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85042566292 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-11-07 Created: 2017-11-07 Last updated: 2020-05-11Bibliographically approved
Kristén, L., Lydell, M. & Nyholm, M. (2017). Physical activity for children in need of support: views from coaches from local sports clubs. In: Krister Hertting & Urban Johnson (Ed.), Proceedings of the Nordic Sport Science Conference – ‘The Double-Edged Sword of Sport: Health Promotion Versus Unhealthy Environments’: . Paper presented at Nordic Sport Science Conference “The Double Edged Sword of Sport: Health Promoting Versus Unhealthy Environments”, November 21–23, 2017, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden (pp. 29-29). Halmstad: Halmstad University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Physical activity for children in need of support: views from coaches from local sports clubs
2017 (English)In: Proceedings of the Nordic Sport Science Conference – ‘The Double-Edged Sword of Sport: Health Promotion Versus Unhealthy Environments’ / [ed] Krister Hertting & Urban Johnson, Halmstad: Halmstad University Press, 2017, p. 29-29Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Halmstad: Halmstad University Press, 2017
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-35389 (URN)
Conference
Nordic Sport Science Conference “The Double Edged Sword of Sport: Health Promoting Versus Unhealthy Environments”, November 21–23, 2017, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden
Available from: 2017-11-10 Created: 2017-11-10 Last updated: 2019-05-27Bibliographically approved
Rosenberg, D., Schön, U.-K., Nyholm, M., Grim, K. & Svedberg, P. (2017). Shared decision making in community mental health services - an evaluation of three self-reporting instruments. Journal of Mental Health, 26(2), 142-149
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Shared decision making in community mental health services - an evaluation of three self-reporting instruments
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2017 (English)In: Journal of Mental Health, ISSN 0963-8237, E-ISSN 1360-0567, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 142-149Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Despite the potential impact of shared decision making on users satisfaction with care and quality in health care decisions, there is a lack of knowledge and skills regarding how to work with shared decision making among health care providers.

Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of three instruments that measure varied dimensions of shared decision making, based on self-reports by clients, in a Swedish community mental health context.

Method: The study sample consisted of 121 clients with experience of community mental health care, and involved in a wide range of decisions regarding both social support and treatment. The questionnaires were examined for face and content validity, internal consistency, test-retest reliability and construct validity.

Results: The instruments displayed good face and content validity, satisfactory internal consistency and a moderate to good level of stability in test-retest reliability with fair to moderate construct correlations, in a sample of clients with serious mental illness and experience of community mental health services in Sweden.

Conclusions: The questionnaires are considered to be relevant to the decision making process, user-friendly and appropriate in a Swedish community mental health care context. They functioned well in settings where non-medical decisions, regarding social and support services, are the primary focus. The use of instruments that measure various dimensions of the self-reported experience of clients, can be a key factor in developing knowledge of how best to implement shared decision making in mental health services. © Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge, 2017
Keywords
Recovery, mental illness, questionnaire, shared decision making, reliability, validity
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-31791 (URN)10.1080/09638237.2016.1207223 (DOI)000399610500008 ()27452763 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84979502225 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding: The National Board of Health and Welfare (Socialstyrelsen), Sweden

Available from: 2016-08-17 Created: 2016-08-17 Last updated: 2020-03-20Bibliographically approved
Morgan, A., Nygren, J. M., Nyholm, M. & Svedberg, P. (2017). Social capital as a theory of change for young people’s health: a scoping review preliminary findings. Paper presented at EUPHA 2017 - 10th European Public Health Conference Sustaining resilient and healthy communities, Stockholm, Sweden, 1–4 November, 2017. European Journal of Public Health, 27(Suppl. 3), 85-85, Article ID ckx187.217.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Social capital as a theory of change for young people’s health: a scoping review preliminary findings
2017 (English)In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 27, no Suppl. 3, p. 85-85, article id ckx187.217Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-35364 (URN)10.1093/eurpub/ckx187.217 (DOI)000414389800196 ()
Conference
EUPHA 2017 - 10th European Public Health Conference Sustaining resilient and healthy communities, Stockholm, Sweden, 1–4 November, 2017
Available from: 2017-11-07 Created: 2017-11-07 Last updated: 2020-05-11Bibliographically approved
Ahlborg, M., Svedberg, P., Nyholm, M., Morgan, A. & Nygren, J. M. (2017). Socioeconomic inequalities in health among Swedish adolescents - adding the subjective perspective. BMC Public Health, 17, Article ID 838.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Socioeconomic inequalities in health among Swedish adolescents - adding the subjective perspective
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2017 (English)In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 17, article id 838Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Socioeconomic inequalities in adolescent health predict future inequalities in adult health. Subjective measures of socioeconomic status (SES) may contribute with an increased understanding of these inequalities. The aim of this study was to investigate socioeconomic health inequalities using both a subjective and an objective measure of SES among Swedish adolescents.

Method

Cross-sectional HBSC-data from 2002 to 2014 was used with a total sample of 23,088 adolescents aged 11–15 years. Three measures of self-rated health (dependent variables) were assessed: multiple health complaints, life satisfaction and health perception. SES was measured objectively by the Family Affluence Scale (FAS) and subjectively by “perceived family wealth” (independent variables). The trend for health inequalities was investigated descriptively with independent t-tests and the relationship between independent and dependent variables was investigated with multiple logistic regression analysis. Gender, age and survey year was considered as possible confounders.

Results

Subjective SES was more strongly related to health outcomes than the objective measure (FAS). Also, the relation between FAS and health was weakened and even reversed (for multiple health complaints) when subjective SES was tested simultaneously in regression models (FAS OR: 1.03, CI: 1.00;1.06 and subjective SES OR: 0.66, CI: 0.63;0.68).

Conclusions

The level of socioeconomic inequalities in adolescent health varied depending on which measure that was used to define SES. When focusing on adolescents, the subjective appraisals of SES is important to consider because they seem to provide a stronger tool for identifying inequalities in health for this group. This finding is important for policy makers to consider given the persistence of health inequalities in Sweden and other high-income countries. ©  The Author(s). 2017

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: BioMed Central, 2017
Keywords
Socioeconomic inequality, Self-rated health, Socioeconomic status, Adolescence, HBSC
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-34983 (URN)10.1186/s12889-017-4863-x (DOI)000413475600007 ()29061173 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85032185321 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding: Ljungbergska Foundation, Länsförsäkringar Halland, the municipality of Halmstad and Halmstad University

Available from: 2017-09-15 Created: 2017-09-15 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Svedberg, P., Morgan, A., Nygren, J. M. & Nyholm, M. (2017). The association between social capital on health quality of life among adolescents. Paper presented at EUPHA 2017 - 10th European Public Health Conference Sustaining resilient and healthy communities, Stockholm, Sweden, 1–4 November, 2017. European Journal of Public Health, 27(Suppl. 3), 365-365, Article ID ckx189.162.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The association between social capital on health quality of life among adolescents
2017 (English)In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 27, no Suppl. 3, p. 365-365, article id ckx189.162Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017
Keywords
adolescent, quality of life, social capital
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-35363 (URN)10.1093/eurpub/ckx189.162 (DOI)000414389804055 ()
Conference
EUPHA 2017 - 10th European Public Health Conference Sustaining resilient and healthy communities, Stockholm, Sweden, 1–4 November, 2017
Available from: 2017-11-07 Created: 2017-11-07 Last updated: 2020-05-11Bibliographically approved
Svedberg, P., Nygren, J., Staland Nyman, C. & Nyholm, M. (2016). The validity of socioeconomic status measures among adolescents based on self-reported information about parents occupations, FAS and perceived SES; implication for health related quality of life studies. BMC Medical Research Methodology, 16, Article ID 48.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The validity of socioeconomic status measures among adolescents based on self-reported information about parents occupations, FAS and perceived SES; implication for health related quality of life studies
2016 (English)In: BMC Medical Research Methodology, ISSN 1471-2288, E-ISSN 1471-2288, Vol. 16, article id 48Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Research has shown inconsistencies in results and difficulties in conceptualization of assessment of socioeconomic status (SES) among adolescents. The aim of this study was thus to test the validity of self-reported information on SES in two age-groups (11–13 and 14–16 years old) in an adolescent population and to evaluate its relationship to self-reported health related quality of life (HRQOL). Different measures of SES commonly used in research in relation to HRQOL were tested in this study; parent’s occupations status, family material affluence status (FAS) and perceived SES.

Method

A cross-sectional study, with a sample of 948 respondents (n = 467, 11–13 years old and n  = 481, 14–16 years old) completed questionnaires about SES and HRQOL. The adolescents’ completion rates were used, with chi2-test, to investigate differences between gender and age-group. Correlation was used for convergent validity and ANOVA for concurrent validity.

Results

We found a low completion rate for both fathers’ (41.7 %) and mothers' (37.5 %) occupation status, and a difference in completion rate between gender and age-groups. FAS had the highest completion rate (100 %) compared to parent's occupations status and perceived SES. The convergent validity between the SES-indicators was weak (Spearman correlation coefficient below 0.3), suggesting that the indicators measured different dimensions of SES. Both FAS and perceived SES showed a gradient in mean HRQOL between low and high SES in relation to HRQOL, this was significant only for perceived SES (p < 0.01, both age-groups).

Conclusion

This study indicates the need for considering different approaches to measures of SES among adolescences and when evaluating SES in relation to HRQOL. Further research is needed to investigate sustainable ways to measure SES, delineating the relevance of tangible measures of education, occupation and income in relation to the perceived socioeconomic status in comparison with others in immediate social networks and in society at large.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: BioMed Central, 2016
Keywords
Adolescents, Completion rate, Concurrent validity, Convergent validity health related Quality of Life (HRQOL), Measurement, Socioeconomic status
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-31793 (URN)10.1186/s12874-016-0148-9 (DOI)000375100000001 ()27130331 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84964645579 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding: municipality of Halmstad, Länsförsäkringar Halland, Ljungbergska foundation and Region Halland

Available from: 2016-08-17 Created: 2016-08-17 Last updated: 2020-05-07Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-4218-4499

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