hh.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Publications (7 of 7) Show all publications
Carlzon, L., Karlsson, A., Falk, K., Liess, A. & Møller, S. (2018). Extreme weather affects Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus tundrius) breeding success in South Greenland. Ornis Hungarica, 26(2), 38-50
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Extreme weather affects Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus tundrius) breeding success in South Greenland
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Ornis Hungarica, ISSN 1215-1610, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 38-50Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In order to better understand the potential effects of climate change on the Peregrine Falcon, we investigated the relationship between extreme weather events and Peregrines’ breeding success in South Greenland. We defined three variables – number of days with extremely low temperatures, extreme precipitation, consecutive rainy days – and an additive variable, total days with extreme weather, and tested their relationship with Peregrines’ breeding success (measured as young per site and nest success) over a 33 year study period. Breeding success was negatively influenced by the number of days with extreme weather and extremely low temperature. The strongest relationship found was total days with extreme weather in the entire breeding season, which explained 22% and 27% of the variation in nest success and young per site, respectively. The number of days with extreme weather in our study related to fluctuations in the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). Thus, with a strengthening of the NAO, linked to climate change, more extreme weather may occur in the Arctic and induce increased variation in Peregrines’ breeding success. Our data did not allow us to pinpoint when in the breeding cycle inclement weather was particularly harmful, and we recommend finer-scale research (e.g. automated nest cameras) to better monitor the species-specific effects of rapidly changing climate.

Abstract [hu]

A klímaváltozás vándorsólymokra gyakorolt lehetséges hatásainak jobb

megértése érdekében a faj költési sikerének és a szélsőséges időjárási események kapcsolatát1

vizsgáltuk Dél-Grönlandon. Négy változót határoztunk meg – szélsőségesen alacsony hőmérsékletű napok száma, túlzott csapadékmennyiség, egymást követő esős napok száma –kiegészítve a szélsőséges napok teljes számával, melyeket a vándorsólymok költési sikerével (fiókák száma és a fészek sikeressége) vetettünk össze, egy 33 évet felölelő adatsor alapján.A költés sikeressége egyaránt negatív összefüggést mutatott a szélsőséges időjárású, valamint az alacsony hőmérsékletű napok számával. A legerősebb összefüggést mutató változó afészek sikerességében és a fiókák számában mutatkozó változatosság 22, illetve 27%-átmagyarázta. A szélsőséges időjárású napok száma összefüggést mutat az Észak-Atlanti Osszcillációs Rendszerrel (NAO) Ezért, a NAO erősödésével, mely a klímaváltozáshoz szorosan kapcsolódik, egyre szélsőségesebb időjárás várható a sarki régióban, amely egyre inkább befolyásolhatja a vándorsólymok költési sikerét. Adataink nem tették lehetővé azt, hogy pontosabban meghatározzuk, hogy a költési időszak melyik szakaszában különösen fenyegetőek ezek a változások, ezért finomabb skálán kivitelezett kutatások (pl.fészekkamerák alkalmazása) javasolt a gyorsan változó klíma küönböző fajokra gyakorolthatásának vizsgálatára.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Budapest: Birdlife Hungary, 2018
Keywords
Arctic, Climate change, Productivity, klímaváltozás, költési siker, Sarki-öv
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-38135 (URN)10.1515/orhu-2018-0014 (DOI)
Note

The field work on Falcon ecology over several decades has been funded by a range of private funds – all listed at http://vandrefalk.dk/sponsorer_eng.shtml.

Available from: 2018-10-10 Created: 2018-10-10 Last updated: 2019-03-20Bibliographically approved
Diehl, S., Thomsson, G., Kahlert, M., Guo, J., Karlsson, J. & Liess, A. (2018). Inverse relationship of epilithic algae and pelagic phosphorusin unproductive lakes: Roles of N2 fixers and light. Freshwater Biology, 63(7), 662-675
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Inverse relationship of epilithic algae and pelagic phosphorusin unproductive lakes: Roles of N2 fixers and light
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Freshwater Biology, ISSN 0046-5070, E-ISSN 1365-2427, Vol. 63, no 7, p. 662-675Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

1. Phosphorus (P) often limits the biomass of primary producers in freshwater lakes. However, in unproductive northern lakes, where anthropogenic nitrogen (N) deposition is low, N instead of P can limit primary producers. In addition, light can be limiting to primary producers at high concentrations of coloured dissolved organic matter (cDOM), as cDOM is the major determinant of light penetration in these lakes.

2. To address resource limitation of epilithic algal biomass, we repeatedly sampled epilithon (periphyton on stony substrata) in 20 lakes covering a large, correlated cDOM and N-deposition gradient across boreal and subarctic Sweden. Across these lakes, pelagic total N (TN) and total P (TP) were positively correlated, and benthic light supply was negatively correlated, with cDOM. Microscopically determined algal biovolume and epilithic carbon (C), N and P were subsequently regressed against benthic light supply and pelagic TN and TP.

3. Patterns in epilithic biovolume were driven by N2-fixing cyanobacteria, which accounted for 2%–90% of total epilithic biovolume. Averaged over the growing season, epilithic algal biovolume, C and N were negatively related to TP and positively to TN, and were highest in the clearest, most phosphorus-poor lakes, where epilithon was heavily dominated by potentially N2-fixing cyanobacteria.

4. A structural equation model supports the hypothesis that cDOM had two counteracting effects on total epilithic algal biovolume: a positive one by providing N to algae that depend on dissolved N for growth, and a negative one by shading N2-fixing cyanobacteria, with the negative effect being somewhat stronger.

5. Together, these findings suggest that (1) light and N are the main resources limiting epilithic algal biomass in boreal to subarctic Swedish lakes, (2) epilithic cyanobacteria are more competitive in high-light and low-nitrogen environments, where their N2-fixing ability allows them to reach high biomass, and (3) epilithic N increases with N2 fixer biomass and is—seemingly paradoxically—highest in the most oligotrophic lakes. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Inc., 2018
Keywords
dissolved organic matter, light, nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria, nutrients, periphyton
National Category
Biological Sciences Biological Systematics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-38133 (URN)10.1111/fwb.13103 (DOI)000434110200005 ()2-s2.0-85044620431 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 621-2014-5238Swedish Research Council Formas
Note

Funding: Oscar and Lili Lamms Minne foundation; Umeå University Young Researcher Award; Swedish Research Council, Grant/Award Number: dnr. 621-2014-5238; Swedish Research Council for Environment, Agricultural Sciences and Spatial Planning (FORMAS), strong research environment Lake Ecosystem Response to Environmental Change (LEREC)

Available from: 2018-10-10 Created: 2018-10-10 Last updated: 2018-10-11Bibliographically approved
Maaroufi, N., Palmqvist, K., Bach, L. H., Bokhorst, S., Liess, A., Gundale, M. J., . . . Meunier, C. L. (2018). Nutrient optimization of tree growth alters structure and function of boreal soil food webs. Forest Ecology and Management, 428, 46-56
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nutrient optimization of tree growth alters structure and function of boreal soil food webs
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Forest Ecology and Management, ISSN 0378-1127, E-ISSN 1872-7042, Vol. 428, p. 46-56Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Nutrient optimization has been proposed as a way to increase boreal forest production, and involves chronic additions of liquid fertilizer with amounts of micro- and macro-nutrients adjusted annually to match tree nutritional requirements. We used a short-term (maintained since 2007) and a long-term (maintained since 1987) fertilization experiment in northern Sweden, in order to understand nutrient optimization effects on soil microbiota and mesofauna, and to explore the relationships between plant litter and microbial elemental stoichiometry. Soil microbes, soil fauna, and aboveground litter were collected from the control plots, and short- and long-term nutrient optimization plots. Correlation analyses revealed no relationships between microbial biomass and litter nutrient ratios. Litter C:N, C:P and N:P ratios declined in response to both optimization treatments; while only microbial C:P ratios declined in response to long-term nutrient optimization. Further, we found that both short- and long-term optimization treatments decreased total microbial, fungal, and bacterial PLFA biomass and shifted the microbial community structure towards a lower fungi:bacterial ratio. In contrast, abundances of most fungal- and bacterial-feeding soil biota were little affected by the nutrient optimization treatments. However, abundance of hemi-edaphic Collembola declined in response to the long-term nutrient optimization treatment. The relative abundances (%) of fungal-feeding and plant-feeding nematodes, respectively, declined and increased in response to both short-term and long-term treatments; bacterial-feeding nematodes increased relative to fungal feeders. Overall, our results demonstrate that long-term nutrient optimization aiming to increase forest production decreases litter C:N, C:P and N:P ratios, microbial C:P ratios and fungal biomass, whereas higher trophic levels are less affected. © 2018 Elsevier B.V.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Nematode, Mesofauna, Microbes, Boreal forest, Ecological stoichiometry, Leaf litter quality, Nutrient ratios
National Category
Biological Systematics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-38134 (URN)10.1016/j.foreco.2018.06.034 (DOI)000440770600006 ()2-s2.0-85049090888 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding: the Center for Environmental Research in Umeå (CMF; grant number: CMF1122373) and the Swedish Research Council (FORMAS; grant number: 2010-67).

Available from: 2018-10-10 Created: 2018-10-10 Last updated: 2019-01-18Bibliographically approved
Furey, P., Liess, A. & Lee, S. (2018). Substratum-Associated Microbiota [Review]. Water environment research, 90(10), 1171-1205
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Substratum-Associated Microbiota
2018 (English)In: Water environment research, ISSN 1061-4303, E-ISSN 1554-7531, Vol. 90, no 10, p. 1171-1205Article, book review (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This review briefly highlights findings from a survey of 2017 literature on substratum-associated microbiota from a variety of aquatic environments, but primarily freshwaters. Centered on algae, cyanobacteria, and bacteria, topics covered include those of relevance to the Water Environment Federation, along with those of recent and emerging interest such as new or updated methods, new and interesting taxa, general ecology, trophic interactions, biogeochemical cycling, aquatic pollutants like herbicides and heavy metals, and nuisance, bloom-forming, or harmful algae. Additional coverage includes studies on bioremediation, bioassessment, biomonitoring and quantification of benthic microbiota.  © 2018 Water Environment Federation

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, 2018
Keywords
algae, bacteria, biofilm, cyanobacteria, diatoms, microbes, periphyton
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-38132 (URN)10.2175/106143018X15289915807209 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-10-10 Created: 2018-10-10 Last updated: 2018-10-10Bibliographically approved
Meunier, C. L., Liess, A., Andersson, A., Brugel, S., Paczkowska, J., Rahman, H., . . . Rowe, O. F. (2017). Allochthonous carbon is a major driver of the microbial food web - A mesocosm study simulating elevated terrestrial matter runoff. Marine Environmental Research, 129, 236-244
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Allochthonous carbon is a major driver of the microbial food web - A mesocosm study simulating elevated terrestrial matter runoff
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Marine Environmental Research, ISSN 0141-1136, E-ISSN 1879-0291, Vol. 129, p. 236-244Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Climate change predictions indicate that coastal and estuarine environments will receive increased terrestrial runoff via increased river discharge. This discharge transports allochthonous material, containing bioavailable nutrients and light attenuating matter. Since light and nutrients are important drivers ofbasal production, their relative and absolute availability have important consequences for the base of the aquatic food web, with potential ramifications for higher trophic levels. Here, we investigated the effects of shifts in terrestrial organic matter and light availability on basal producers and their grazers. In twelve Baltic Sea mesocosms, we simulated the effects of increased river runoff alone and in combination. We manipulated light (clear/shade) and carbon (added/not added) in a fully factorial design, with three replicates. We assessed microzooplankton grazing preferences in each treatment to assess whether increased terrestrial organic matter input would: (1) decrease the phytoplankton to bacterial biomass ratio, (2) shift microzooplanlcton diet from phytoplankton to bacteria, and (3) affect microzooplankton biomass. We found that carbon addition, but not reduced light levels per se resulted in lower phytoplanlcton to bacteria biomass ratios. Microzooplankton generally showed a strong feeding preference for phytoplanlcton over bacteria, but, in carbon-amended mesocosms which favored bacteria, microzooplankton shifted their diet towards bacteria. Furthermore, low total prey availability corresponded with low microzooplankton biomass and the highest bacteria/phytoplankton ratio. Overall our results suggest that in shallow coastal waters, modified with allochthonous matter from river discharge, light attenuation may be inconsequential for the basal producer balance, whereas increased allochthonous carbon, especially if readily bioavailable, favors bacteria over phytoplankton. We conclude that climate change induced shifts at the base of the food web may alter energy mobilization to and thebiomass of microzooplankton grazers. (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Keywords
Trophic interactions, Food quality, Phytoplankton, Bacteria, Competition, Microzooplaktion
National Category
Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-35038 (URN)10.1016/j.marenvres.2017.06.008 (DOI)000407981500021 ()28645656 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85021065789 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas
Note

CLM was financed by the Young Researchers Award from Umeå University to AL and AA, JP, SB and OR were financed by the EcoChange project. This study was supported by the Lars Hierta Memorial Foundation and the Strategic Marine Environmental Research program Ecosystem dynamics in the Baltic Sea in a changing climate perspective (EcoChange), a FORMAS funded initiative. This study was also partially supported by a grant from the Oscar and Lilli Lamms foundation (FO2011-0095) to Carolyn Faithfull.

Available from: 2017-09-20 Created: 2017-09-20 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
Furey, P. C., Liess, A. & Lee, S. (2017). Substratum-Associated Microbiota. Water environment research, 89(10), 1634-1675
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Substratum-Associated Microbiota
2017 (English)In: Water environment research, ISSN 1061-4303, E-ISSN 1554-7531, Vol. 89, no 10, p. 1634-1675Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This survey of literature on substratum-associated microbiota from 2016 includes highlights of research findings associated with algae, cyanobacteria, and bacteria from a variety of aquatic environments, but primarily freshwaters. It covers topics of relevance to the Water Environment Federation along with those of emerging or recent interest such as nuisance, bloom forming and harmful algae, fossil fuel related contamination, and other environmental pollutants like nanoparticles. Additional interesting findings reported on include general ecology, method development, multistressor interactions, nutrient cycling, taxonomy and systematics, trophic interactions, and biomonitoring, bioassessment, and bioremediation.  © 2017 Water Environment Federation

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Alexandria, VA: Water Environment Federation, 2017
Keywords
Algae, Bacteria, Biofilm, Cyanobacteria, Diatoms, Microbes, Periphyton
National Category
Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-35039 (URN)10.2175/106143017X15023776270610 (DOI)000393312600029 ()28954679 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85033213152 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-09-20 Created: 2017-09-20 Last updated: 2018-12-17Bibliographically approved
Wagenhoff, A. & Liess, A. (2017). Thresholds in ecosystem structural and functionalresponses to agricultural stressors can informlimit setting in streams. Freshwater Science, 36(1), 178-194
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Thresholds in ecosystem structural and functionalresponses to agricultural stressors can informlimit setting in streams
2017 (English)In: Freshwater Science, ISSN 2161-9549, E-ISSN 2161-9565, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 178-194Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Setting numeric in-stream objectives (limits, criteria) to inform limits on catchment loads for major land-use stressors is a promising policy instrument to prevent ecosystem degradation. Management objectives can be informed by thresholds identified from stressor–response shapes of ecological indicators based on field survey data. Use of multiple structural and functional indicators and different organism groups provides multiple lines of evidence to make objectives more robust. We measured a suite of ecological indicators during a regional field survey in New Zealand. We built flexible boosted regression tree (BRT) models with a predictor set consisting of nutrient, sediment, and environmental variables and investigated the fitted functions for different types of thresholds across each stressor gradient. Congruence of impact initiation (II) thresholds for N among macroinvertebrate metrics and 2 periphyton indicators provided multiple lines of evidence for ecosystem change with small increases in N concentrations above background levels. Impact cessation (IC) on macroinvertebrate metrics at total N = ~0.5 mg/L (below N concentrations that saturate important ecosystem processes) highlighted sensitivity of macroinvertebrate communities to eutrophication. We found few stressor–response relationships for sediment. We suggest use of sediment-specific macroinvertebrate metrics and a reliable measure of deposited fine sediment in the future. Few indicators responded to phosphorus (P) concentration. Limited information for setting P objectives highlights the need to develop alternative indicators of P loading. Statistical analysis based on single-stressor inferential threshold models suggested that these models carry high risk of identifying spurious thresholds and are less suitable for setting management objectives. II and IC thresholds of multiple ecological indicators can be used to set robust objectives aimed at different levels of protection of ecosystem health.

Keywords
ecological thresholds, effects-based criteria, nutrient targets, diffuse pollution
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-33652 (URN)10.1086/690233 (DOI)000394633500015 ()2-s2.0-85012895078 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-03-31 Created: 2017-03-31 Last updated: 2018-03-23Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-1556-3861

Search in DiVA

Show all publications