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Larsson, Tony
Publications (10 of 73) Show all publications
Aramrattana, M., Larsson, T., Jansson, J. & Nåbo, A. (2019). A simulation framework for cooperative intelligent transport systems testing and evaluation. Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour, 61, 268-280
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A simulation framework for cooperative intelligent transport systems testing and evaluation
2019 (English)In: Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour, ISSN 1369-8478, E-ISSN 1873-5517, Vol. 61, p. 268-280Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Connected and automated driving in the context of cooperative intelligent transport systems (C-ITS) is an emerging area in transport systems research. Interaction and cooperation between actors in transport systems are now enabled by the connectivity by means of vehicle-to-vehicle and vehicle-to-infrastructure (V2X) communication. To ensure the goals of C-ITS, which are safer and more efficient transport systems, testing and evaluation are required before deployment of C-ITS applications. Therefore, this paper presents a simulation framework—consisting of driving-, traffic-, and network-simulators—for testing and evaluation of C-ITS applications. Examples of cooperative adaptive cruise control (CACC) applications are presented, and are used as test cases for the simulation framework as well as to elaborate on potential use cases of it. Challenges from combining the simulators into one framework, and limitations are reported and discussed. Finally, the paper concludes with future development directions, and applications of the simulation framework in testing and evaluation of C-ITS. © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Kidlington: Pergamon Press, 2019
Keywords
C-ITS, driving simulator, traffic simulator, network simulator, platooning
National Category
Other Electrical Engineering, Electronic Engineering, Information Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-34870 (URN)10.1016/j.trf.2017.08.004 (DOI)2-s2.0-85028624553 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Vehicle ICT Innovation Methodology (VICTIg)
Funder
Knowledge Foundation
Note

This work is supported by SAFER – Vehicle and Traffic Safety Centre at Chalmers, as a part of Vehicle ICT Innovation Methodology (VICTIg) project.

Available from: 2017-09-04 Created: 2017-09-04 Last updated: 2019-04-03Bibliographically approved
Aramrattana, M., Englund, C., Larsson, T., Jansson, J. & Nåbo, A. (2018). Safety Evaluation of Highway Platooning Under a Cut-In Situation Using Simulation. IEEE transactions on intelligent transportation systems (Print)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Safety Evaluation of Highway Platooning Under a Cut-In Situation Using Simulation
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2018 (English)In: IEEE transactions on intelligent transportation systems (Print), ISSN 1524-9050, E-ISSN 1558-0016Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
Abstract [en]

Platooning refers to an application, where a group of connected and automated vehicles follow a lead vehicle autonomously, with short inter-vehicular distances. At merging points on highways such as on-ramp, platoons could encounter manually driven vehicles, which are merging on to the highways. In some situations, the manually driven vehicles could end up between the platooning vehicles. Such situations are expected and known as “cut-in” situations. This paper presents a simulation study of a cut-in situation, where a platoon of five vehicles encounter a manually driven vehicle at a merging point of a highway. The manually driven vehicle is driven by 37 test persons using a driving simulator. For the platooning vehicles, two longitudinal controllers with four gap settings between the platooning vehicles, i.e. 15 meters, 22.5 meters, 30 meters, and 42.5 meters, are evaluated. Results summarizing cut-in behaviours and how the participants perceived the situation are presented. Furthermore, the situation is assessed using safety indicators based on time-to-collision.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Piscataway, NJ: IEEE, 2018
Keywords
driving simulator, highway platooning, cut-in, cooperative adaptive cruise control, safety evaluation, time-to-collision
National Category
Computer Sciences Engineering and Technology Transport Systems and Logistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-38389 (URN)
Available from: 2018-11-20 Created: 2018-11-20 Last updated: 2018-11-26
Aramrattana, M., Detournay, J., Englund, C., Frimodig, V., Jansson, O. U., Larsson, T., . . . Shahanoor, G. (2018). Team Halmstad Approach to Cooperative Driving in the Grand Cooperative Driving Challenge 2016. IEEE transactions on intelligent transportation systems (Print), 19(4), 1248-1261
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Team Halmstad Approach to Cooperative Driving in the Grand Cooperative Driving Challenge 2016
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2018 (English)In: IEEE transactions on intelligent transportation systems (Print), ISSN 1524-9050, E-ISSN 1558-0016, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 1248-1261Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper is an experience report of team Halmstad from the participation in a competition organised by the i-GAME project, the Grand Cooperative Driving Challenge 2016. The competition was held in Helmond, The Netherlands, during the last weekend of May 2016. We give an overview of our car’s control and communication system that was developed for the competition following the requirements and specifications of the i-GAME project. In particular, we describe our implementation of cooperative adaptive cruise control, our solution to the communication and logging requirements, as well as the high level decision making support. For the actual competition we did not manage to completely reach all of the goals set out by the organizers as well as ourselves. However, this did not prevent us from outperforming the competition. Moreover, the competition allowed us to collect data for further evaluation of our solutions to cooperative driving. Thus, we discuss what we believe were the strong points of our system, and discuss post-competition evaluation of the developments that were not fully integrated into our system during competition time. © 2000-2011 IEEE.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Piscataway, N.J.: Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 2018
Keywords
Adaptive cruise control, Cruise control, Decision making, Autonomous driving, Cooperative adaptive cruise control, Cooperative driving, GCDC 2016, IEEE 802.11p, platooning, Cooperative communication
National Category
Computer and Information Sciences Software Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-38712 (URN)10.1109/TITS.2017.2752359 (DOI)000429017300023 ()2-s2.0-85041535321 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-01-08 Created: 2019-01-08 Last updated: 2019-01-08Bibliographically approved
Aramrattana, M., Englund, C., Jansson, J., Larsson, T. & Nåbo, A. (2017). Safety Analysis of Cooperative Adaptive Cruise Control in Vehicle Cut-in Situations. In: Proceedings of 2017 4th International Symposium on Future Active Safety Technology towards Zero-Traffic-Accidents (FAST-zero): . Paper presented at 4th International Symposium on Future Active Safety Technology towards Zero-Traffic-Accidents (FAST-Zero’17), Nara, Japan, 18-22 September, 2017. Society of Automotive Engineers of Japan, Article ID 20174621.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Safety Analysis of Cooperative Adaptive Cruise Control in Vehicle Cut-in Situations
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2017 (English)In: Proceedings of 2017 4th International Symposium on Future Active Safety Technology towards Zero-Traffic-Accidents (FAST-zero), Society of Automotive Engineers of Japan , 2017, article id 20174621Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Cooperative adaptive cruise control (CACC) is a cooperative intelligent transport systems (C-ITS) function, which especially when used in platooning applications, possess many expected benefits including efficient road space utilization and reduced fuel consumption. Cut-in manoeuvres in platoons can potentially reduce those benefits, and are not desired from a safety point of view. Unfortunately, in realistic traffic scenarios, cut-in manoeuvres can be expected, especially from non-connected vehicles. In this paper two different controllers for platooning are explored, aiming at maintaining the safety of the platoon while a vehicle is cutting in from the adjacent lane. A realistic scenario, where a human driver performs the cut-in manoeuvre is used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the controllers. Safety analysis of CACC controllers using time to collision (TTC) under such situation is presented. The analysis using TTC indicate that, although potential risks are always high in CACC applications such as platooning due to the small inter-vehicular distances, dangerous TTC (TTC < 6 seconds) is not frequent. Future research directions are also discussed along with the results.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Society of Automotive Engineers of Japan, 2017
Keywords
cooperative adaptive cruise control, modelling and simulations
National Category
Computer Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-35681 (URN)
Conference
4th International Symposium on Future Active Safety Technology towards Zero-Traffic-Accidents (FAST-Zero’17), Nara, Japan, 18-22 September, 2017
Funder
Knowledge Foundation
Available from: 2017-12-01 Created: 2017-12-01 Last updated: 2018-11-20Bibliographically approved
Aramrattana, M., Larsson, T., Englund, C., Jansson, J. & Nåbo, A. (2017). Simulation of Cut-In by Manually Driven Vehicles in Platooning Scenarios. In: 2017 IEEE 20th International Conference on Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITSC): . Paper presented at 2017 IEEE 20th International Conference on Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITSC), Kanagawa, Japan, 16-19 October, 2017 (pp. 1-6). Piscataway, NJ: IEEE
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Simulation of Cut-In by Manually Driven Vehicles in Platooning Scenarios
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2017 (English)In: 2017 IEEE 20th International Conference on Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITSC), Piscataway, NJ: IEEE, 2017, p. 1-6Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In the near future, Cooperative Intelligent Transport System (C-ITS) applications are expected to be deployed. To support this, simulation is often used to design and evaluate the applications during the early development phases. Simulations of C-ITS scenarios often assume a fleet of homogeneous vehicles within the transportation system. In contrast, once C-ITS is deployed, the traffic scenarios will consist of a mixture of connected and non-connected vehicles, which, in addition, can be driven manually or automatically. Such mixed cases are rarely analysed, especially those where manually driven vehicles are involved. Therefore, this paper presents a C-ITS simulation framework, which incorporates a manually driven car through a driving simulator interacting with a traffic simulator, and a communication simulator, which together enable modelling and analysis of C-ITS applications and scenarios. Furthermore, example usages in the scenarios, where a manually driven vehicle cut-in to a platoon of Cooperative Adaptive Cruise Control (CACC) equipped vehicles are presented. © 2017 IEEE.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Piscataway, NJ: IEEE, 2017
Keywords
Simulation, driving simulator, network simulator, traffic simulator, c-its, platooning, cooperative adaptive cruise control
National Category
Transport Systems and Logistics Electrical Engineering, Electronic Engineering, Information Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-35734 (URN)10.1109/ITSC.2017.8317806 (DOI)000432373000211 ()2-s2.0-85046266126 (Scopus ID)978-1-5386-1526-3 (ISBN)978-1-5386-1525-6 (ISBN)978-1-5386-1527-0 (ISBN)
Conference
2017 IEEE 20th International Conference on Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITSC), Kanagawa, Japan, 16-19 October, 2017
Funder
Knowledge Foundation
Available from: 2017-12-04 Created: 2017-12-04 Last updated: 2019-01-09Bibliographically approved
Larsson, T. (2017). Telecommunication Exchange Evolution. In: Webster, John G. (Ed.), Wiley Encyclopedia of Electrical and Electronics Engineering: (pp. 1-16). New York: John Wiley & Sons
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Telecommunication Exchange Evolution
2017 (English)In: Wiley Encyclopedia of Electrical and Electronics Engineering / [ed] Webster, John G., New York: John Wiley & Sons, 2017, p. 1-16Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

To telecommunicate means to communicate over distance. The information that is communicated can be of many different forms. Communication over distance has been performed in many different ways if we look back in history, e.g. via drums, fire, telegraph, telephone and more recently also via various computer terminals. This article focuses on the telecommunication exchange development and evolution that for long was driven by the voice communication via telephone sets but that now involves also many other kinds of information carrying medias and the related encoding of the media and thus information. To make the communications economically attractive network topologies have been built to efficiently allow the sharing of physical resources along the paths between communicating parties with access to the network. These resources for example including cables, switches, routers, media translators and radio stations needed to carry the communicated information. An exchange is an important node in the network where several such resources are aggregated in an integrated system node and that is used to connect and enable access to different parts of the whole network. The network and the exchanges are complex long term investments that have evolved and changed over the years in order to cope with new services and challenges in an economically efficient way.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: John Wiley & Sons, 2017
Keywords
Exchange, Switch, Router, Central Office, Media Gate Way, Software Defined Network, Virtualization
National Category
Electrical Engineering, Electronic Engineering, Information Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-34763 (URN)10.1002/047134608X.W2043.pub2 (DOI)9780471346081 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-08-22 Created: 2017-08-22 Last updated: 2018-03-23Bibliographically approved
Pelliccione, P., Kobetski, A., Larsson, T., Aramrattana, M., Aderum, T., Ågren, S. M., . . . Thorsén, A. (2016). Architecting cars as constituents of a system of systems. In: SiSoS@ECSA '16 Proceedings of the International Colloquium on Software-intensive Systems-of-Systems at 10th European Conference on Software Architecture: . Paper presented at 2016 International Colloquium on Software-Intensive Systems-of-Systems at 10th European Conference on Software Architecture, Copenhagen, Denmark, November 29, 2016 (pp. 1-7).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Architecting cars as constituents of a system of systems
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2016 (English)In: SiSoS@ECSA '16 Proceedings of the International Colloquium on Software-intensive Systems-of-Systems at 10th European Conference on Software Architecture, 2016, p. 1-7Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Future transportation systems will be a heterogeneous mix of items with varying connectivity and interoperability. A mix of new technologies and legacy systems will co-exist to realize a variety of scenarios involving not only connected cars but also road infrastructures, pedestrians, cyclists, etc. Future transportation systems can be seen as a System of Systems (SoS), where each constituent system - one of the units that compose an SoS - can act as a standalone system, but the cooperation among the constituent systems enables new emerging and promising scenarios. In this paper we investigate how to architect cars so that they can be constituents of future transportation systems. This work is realized in the context of two Swedish projects coordinated by Volvo Cars and involving some universities and research centers in Sweden and many suppliers of the OEM, including Autoliv, Arccore, Combitech, Cybercom, Knowit, Prevas, ÅF-Technology, Semcom, and Qamcom. © 2016 Association for Computing Machinery. All rights reserved.

Keywords
Automotive, software architecture, systems of systems
National Category
History of Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-40217 (URN)10.1145/3175731.3175733 (DOI)000461556800005 ()2-s2.0-85046731120 (Scopus ID)
Conference
2016 International Colloquium on Software-Intensive Systems-of-Systems at 10th European Conference on Software Architecture, Copenhagen, Denmark, November 29, 2016
Funder
Vinnova
Note

Other funder: Next Generation Electrical Architecture (NGEA)

Available from: 2019-10-17 Created: 2019-10-17 Last updated: 2019-10-17
Aramrattana, M., Larsson, T., Jansson, J. & Nåbo, A. (2016). Cooperative Driving Simulation. In: Proceedings of the Driving Simulation Conference 2016: . Paper presented at DSC 2016 Europe, Driving Simulation and Virtual Reality Conference and Exhibition, 7-9 sept, 2016, Paris, France (pp. 123-132).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cooperative Driving Simulation
2016 (English)In: Proceedings of the Driving Simulation Conference 2016, 2016, p. 123-132Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

For a few decades, driving simulators have been supporting research and development of advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS). In the near future, connected vehicles are expected to be deployed. Driving simulators will need to support evaluation of cooperative driving applications within cooperative intelligent transportation systems (C-ITS) scenarios. C-ITS utilize vehicle-to-vehicle and vehicle-to-infrastructure (V2X) communication. Simulation of the inter vehicle communication is often not supported in driving simulators. On the other hand, previous efforts have been made to connect network simulators and traffic simulators, to perform C-ITS simulations. Nevertheless, interactions between actors in the system is an essential aspect of C-ITS. Driving simulators can provide the opportunity to study interactions and reactions of human drivers to the system. This paper present simulation of a C-ITS scenario using a combination of driving, network, and traffic simulators. The architecture of the solution and important challenges of the integration are presented. A scenario from Grand Cooperative Driving Challenge (GCDC) 2016 is implemented in the simulator as an example use case. Lastly, potential usages and future developments are discussed.

Keywords
C-ITS, Driving simulator, Traffic simulators, Network simulator, Platooning
National Category
Computer Systems Other Electrical Engineering, Electronic Engineering, Information Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-31986 (URN)
Conference
DSC 2016 Europe, Driving Simulation and Virtual Reality Conference and Exhibition, 7-9 sept, 2016, Paris, France
Funder
Knowledge Foundation
Available from: 2016-09-12 Created: 2016-09-12 Last updated: 2018-03-22Bibliographically approved
Aramrattana, M., Larsson, T., Jansson, J. & Nåbo, A. (2016). Extended Driving Simulator for Evaluation of Cooperative Intelligent Transport Systems. In: SIGSIM-PADS '16: Proceedings of the 2016 annual ACM Conference on SIGSIM Principles of Advanced Discrete Simulation. Paper presented at The 2016 annual ACM Conference on SIGSIM Principles of Advanced Discrete Simulation (SIGSIM-PADS '16), May 15-18 2016, Banff, Alberta, Canada (pp. 255-278). New York: ACM Digital Library
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Extended Driving Simulator for Evaluation of Cooperative Intelligent Transport Systems
2016 (English)In: SIGSIM-PADS '16: Proceedings of the 2016 annual ACM Conference on SIGSIM Principles of Advanced Discrete Simulation, New York: ACM Digital Library, 2016, p. 255-278Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Vehicles in cooperative intelligent transport systems (C-ITS) often need to interact with each other in order to achieve their goals, safe and efficient transport services. Since human drivers are still expected to be involved in C-ITS, driving simulators are appropriate tools for evaluation of the C-ITS functions. However, driving simulators often simplify the interactions or influences from the ego vehicle on the traffic. Moreover, they normally do not support vehicle-to-vehicle and vehicle-to-infrastructure (V2X) communication, which is the main enabler for C-ITS. Therefore, to increase the C-ITS evaluation capability, a solution on how to extend a driving simulator with traffic and network simulators to handle cooperative systems is presented as a result of this paper. Evaluation of the result using two use cases is presented. And, the observed limitations and challenges of the solution are reported and discussed. © 2016 ACM, Inc.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: ACM Digital Library, 2016
Keywords
Driving simulator, C-ITS, Traffic simulator, Network simulator
National Category
Communication Systems Computer Systems Vehicle Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-31184 (URN)10.1145/2901378.2901397 (DOI)2-s2.0-84974588112 (Scopus ID)978-1-4503-3742-7 (ISBN)
Conference
The 2016 annual ACM Conference on SIGSIM Principles of Advanced Discrete Simulation (SIGSIM-PADS '16), May 15-18 2016, Banff, Alberta, Canada
Funder
Knowledge Foundation
Available from: 2016-06-15 Created: 2016-06-15 Last updated: 2018-03-22Bibliographically approved
Yu, T., Edén, J., Englund, C. & Larsson, T. (2016). Traffic Situation Estimator for Adaptive Cruise Control. In: 2016 IEEE 17th International Symposium on A World of Wireless, Mobile and Multimedia Networks (WoWMoM): . Paper presented at 17th WoWMoM 2016, International Symposium on a World of Wireless, Mobile and Multimedia Networks, Coimbra, Portugal, 21-24 June, 2016. Piscataway, NJ: IEEE, Article ID 7523567.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Traffic Situation Estimator for Adaptive Cruise Control
2016 (English)In: 2016 IEEE 17th International Symposium on A World of Wireless, Mobile and Multimedia Networks (WoWMoM), Piscataway, NJ: IEEE, 2016, article id 7523567Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

A traffic situation estimator capable of analyzing driving behavior utilizing an image analysis-based tracking module is presented. The behavior is analyzed by using a state machine driven counter to estimate the traffic rhythm and determine if the detected vehicles are approaching, getting away, have been overtaken or have overtaken the ego-vehicle. Depending on the result, the traffic situation estimator suggest different reactions, either to drive faster, slower or optionally suggest to overtake vehicles ahead to help the driver to follow the traffic rhythm which in turn will improve safety and energy efficiency. The proposed approach is implemented in a smart-phone and has shown good performance while testing the application on a two-lane highway. © 2016 IEEE.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Piscataway, NJ: IEEE, 2016
Keywords
Rhythm, Safety, Detectors, Cameras, Algorithm design and analysis, Automobiles
National Category
Embedded Systems Communication Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-32316 (URN)10.1109/WoWMoM.2016.7523567 (DOI)000392273900072 ()2-s2.0-84983760413 (Scopus ID)978-1-5090-2185-7 (ISBN)978-1-5090-2184-0 (ISBN)
Conference
17th WoWMoM 2016, International Symposium on a World of Wireless, Mobile and Multimedia Networks, Coimbra, Portugal, 21-24 June, 2016
Available from: 2016-10-25 Created: 2016-10-25 Last updated: 2018-03-23Bibliographically approved
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