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Olsson, M. Charlotte, DocentORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-9337-5113
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Publications (10 of 48) Show all publications
Larsson, J., Dencker, M., Bremander, A. & Olsson, M. C. (2020). Cardiovascular responses of load carriage in female and male soldiers. In: 5th International Congress on Soldiers physical performance, Quebec City, 11-14 february: . Paper presented at 5th International Congress on Soldiers physical performance (ICSPP 2020), Quebec City, Canada, February 11-14, 2020.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cardiovascular responses of load carriage in female and male soldiers
2020 (English)In: 5th International Congress on Soldiers physical performance, Quebec City, 11-14 february, 2020Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Series
Forskning i Halmstad, ISSN 1400-5409
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-41872 (URN)
Conference
5th International Congress on Soldiers physical performance (ICSPP 2020), Quebec City, Canada, February 11-14, 2020
Available from: 2020-04-09 Created: 2020-04-09 Last updated: 2020-04-09
Larsson, J., Dencker, M., Olsson, M. C. & Bremander, A. (2020). Development and application of a questionnaire to self-rate physical work demands for ground combat soldiers. Applied Ergonomics, 83, Article ID 103002.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Development and application of a questionnaire to self-rate physical work demands for ground combat soldiers
2020 (English)In: Applied Ergonomics, ISSN 0003-6870, E-ISSN 1872-9126, Vol. 83, article id 103002Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The aim of the present study was to identify the most physically demanding work tasks for Swedish ground combat soldiers through the development and application of a questionnaire survey. This is the first in a series of studies aiming to describe the development process and validation of physical selection standards in the Swedish armed forces.

Methods: Based on procedural documentation, combat manuals and job analyses, a questionnaire was developed that defined and rated the perceived physical strain of 30 work tasks for ground combat soldiers. To assess validity, an expert focus group was used and psychometric analysis performed. The questionnaire was then distributed to 231 ground combat soldiers, of whom 165 responded (71%).

Results: The questionnaire was validated in three steps to achieve face and content validity, and internal consistency was acceptable (Chronbach's alpha ≥0.95). Of the 30 work tasks included in the survey, transport of wounded was rated as the most demanding task for both aerobic capacity and strength. Other highly demanding tasks for aerobic capacity included combat movement (low/high crawl), dismounted attack in close country, urban and rough terrain and carrying heavy loads. There were no gender differences for either aerobic or strength demands in the top five most challenging tasks based on proportions.

Conclusions: This study identified the most physically demanding tasks performed in the Swedish ground combat forces. Almost all the physically demanding tasks found in the present study contain elements of lifting and carrying, which require muscular strength and muscular endurance, with no gender differences. © 2019 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford: Elsevier, 2020
Keywords
Ground combat soldiers, Work-demands, Physical demand, Aerobic capacity
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-40998 (URN)10.1016/j.apergo.2019.103002 (DOI)000504789500007 ()31747636 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85074946049 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Armed Forces
Available from: 2019-11-20 Created: 2019-11-20 Last updated: 2020-02-25Bibliographically approved
Ek, S., Wollmer, P., Karlsson, M. K., Peterson, T., Thorsson, O., Olsson, M. C., . . . Dencker, M. (2020). Relative Age Effect of Sport Academy Adolescents, a Physiological Evaluation. Sports, 8(1)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Relative Age Effect of Sport Academy Adolescents, a Physiological Evaluation
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2020 (English)In: Sports, E-ISSN 2075-4663, Vol. 8, no 1Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The relationship between birth quarter distribution and physiological characteristics related to athletic skills, in adolescent sport academy students has not been fully investigated. In a cross-sectional study, we recruited 86 boys and 52 girls aged 12-14 years during their first term at a sport academy school. We measured body size, cardiac size, pulmonary function, body composition, lower body power, cardiorespiratory fitness parameters, and running endurance by standard methods and analyzed these estimates in relation to birth quarter by ANOVA. Birth quarter distribution in our cohort was compared with birth quarter distribution in the same ages in the whole of Sweden and analyzed by logistic regression. The academy had an overrepresentation of students born in the first quartile of the year compared to those born in the last quartile (odds ratio 2.3 (95% CI: 1.1-4.7)). When comparing the physiological characteristics between birth quarters, uniformity is prominent since out of 26 performed physiological and anthropometric tests only four showed statistically significant group differences. We thus believe that the selection process to the sport academy favours athletes with higher chronological age, i.e., a so-called relative age effect is present. © 2020 MDPI (Basel, Switzerland).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Basel: MDPI, 2020
Keywords
exercise physiology, fitness testing, physical maturation, relative age effect, talent selection
National Category
Physiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-41601 (URN)10.3390/sports8010005 (DOI)31936102 (PubMedID)
Projects
MUSSE
Funder
Swedish National Centre for Research in Sports, 2018-0008
Note

Other funders: The Swedish Heart and Lung Association (20120269), Lund University Grants and Halmstad University (46118, 98913, 819961).

Available from: 2020-02-04 Created: 2020-02-04 Last updated: 2020-02-05Bibliographically approved
Khan, T., Lundgren, L., Järpe, E., Olsson, M. C. & Wiberg, P. (2019). A Novel Method for Classification of Running Fatigue Using Change-Point Segmentation. Sensors, 19(21), Article ID 4729.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Novel Method for Classification of Running Fatigue Using Change-Point Segmentation
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2019 (English)In: Sensors, ISSN 1424-8220, E-ISSN 1424-8220, Vol. 19, no 21, article id 4729Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Blood lactate accumulation is a crucial fatigue indicator during sports training. Previous studies have predicted cycling fatigue using surface-electromyography (sEMG) to non-invasively estimate lactate concentration in blood. This study used sEMG to predict muscle fatigue while running and proposes a novel method for the automatic classification of running fatigue based on sEMG. Data were acquired from 12 runners during an incremental treadmill running-test using sEMG sensors placed on the vastus-lateralis, vastus-medialis, biceps-femoris, semitendinosus, and gastrocnemius muscles of the right and left legs. Blood lactate samples of each runner were collected every two minutes during the test. A change-point segmentation algorithm labeled each sample with a class of fatigue level as (1) aerobic, (2) anaerobic, or (3) recovery. Three separate random forest models were trained to classify fatigue using 36 frequency, 51 time-domain, and 36 time-event sEMG features. The models were optimized using a forward sequential feature elimination algorithm. Results showed that the random forest trained using distributive power frequency of the sEMG signal of the vastus-lateralis muscle alone could classify fatigue with high accuracy. Importantly for this feature, group-mean ranks were significantly different (p < 0.01) between fatigue classes. Findings support using this model for monitoring fatigue levels during running. © 2019 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Basel: MDPI, 2019
Keywords
surface-electromyography, blood lactate concentration, random forest, running, fatigue
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-40834 (URN)10.3390/s19214729 (DOI)000498834000126 ()2-s2.0-85074441602 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Knowledge Foundation
Note

Other funder: Swedish Adrenaline.

Available from: 2019-11-04 Created: 2019-11-04 Last updated: 2019-12-17Bibliographically approved
Olsson, M. C., Fälth, J., Ahlebrand, A., Andersson, Å. & Haglund, E. (2019). Bench press muscle activation with triceps brachii pre-exhaustion in females and males. Paper presented at BASES Conference 2019, Leicester, United Kingdom, November 19-20, 2019. Journal of Sports Sciences, 37(Supp1), 71-72, Article ID D2.P6..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bench press muscle activation with triceps brachii pre-exhaustion in females and males
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Sports Sciences, ISSN 0264-0414, E-ISSN 1466-447X, Vol. 37, no Supp1, p. 71-72, article id D2.P6.Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Abingdon: Routledge, 2019
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-41063 (URN)10.1080/02640414.2019.1671688 (DOI)
Conference
BASES Conference 2019, Leicester, United Kingdom, November 19-20, 2019
Available from: 2019-12-02 Created: 2019-12-02 Last updated: 2019-12-10Bibliographically approved
Larsson, J., Engberg, A., Turnstedt, M., Dencker, M., Bremander, A. & Olsson, M. C. (2019). Cardiovascular Effects of Load Carriage in Soldiers; A Pilot Study. In: Bunc, V. & Tsolakidis, E. (Ed.), Book of Abstracts of the 24th Annual Congress of the European College of Sport Science – 3rd - 6th July 2019, Prague – Czech Republic: . Paper presented at 24th Annual Congress of the European College of Sport Science, ECSS, Prague, Czech Republic, 3-6 July, 2019 (pp. 422-423). European College of Sport Science
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cardiovascular Effects of Load Carriage in Soldiers; A Pilot Study
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2019 (English)In: Book of Abstracts of the 24th Annual Congress of the European College of Sport Science – 3rd - 6th July 2019, Prague – Czech Republic / [ed] Bunc, V. & Tsolakidis, E., European College of Sport Science , 2019, p. 422-423Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Previous studies have shown that risk of physical fatigue increases if prolonged average work intensity exceeds 50% of oxygen uptake (VO2). In order to avoid persistent fatigue in a work setting, it is important to conduct suitable work capacity analyses. In physically demanding jobs where wearing protective gear and/or external load is mandatory, monitoring of cardiovascular demands through heart rate (HR) is one way to track the workers’ relative effort.  There are limited studies examining effects of load carrying on cardiovascular capacity where it appears that VO2peak differ when soldiers and firefighters are tested with work-related equipment/clothing compared to light clothing. The aim of this pilot study was to investigate effects of load (combat gear) on HR, VO2 and muscle oxygen saturation (SmO2) compared to no load in soldiers during a graded treadmill protocol.

Methods: Eight volunteer army soldiers (1 woman, 7 men) performed a graded treadmill test until exhaustion. All soldiers performed the test twice, once with light clothes and no load (NL) and once with added load, their personal combat gear (CG), with at least 48 h between sessions. The treadmill protocol stages included supine and standing positions, followed by marching speeds of 5.4 km/h and 8 km/h at 0 incline (all 5 min) immediately followed by a set marching speed of 8 km/h with a starting incline of 2 % increasing the incline 2 % every third minute until voluntary exhaustion. Measurements of HR, VO2 and SmO2 were collected continuously and the last 30 s of each stage were averaged and used for statistical analyses (paired t-tests).

Results: The mean added load for all soldiers with CG was 16.8 ± 1.1 kg. All soldiers completed at least 6 stages (range 6-11 stages) with both NL and CG, where time to exhaustion with NL was longer (19.1 ± 3.2 min) compared to CG (9.1 ± 2.9 min; p <0.01). Submaximal HR and VO2 were both significantly higher with CG compared to NL (at absolute intensities) at all marching speeds all soldiers completed (5.4 km/h 0 % grade - 8 km/h 4% grade; all p<0.05). For SmO2, marching with CG compared to NL resulted in increased muscle oxygen utilization, at submaximal stages 8 km/h 0% -4% grade (all p<0.05). For values at maximal effort the CG had a significantly lower VO2peak (3.7 ± 0.5 L/min) compared to NL (4.1 ± 0.6 L/min, p <0.01), whereas there was no difference in HRpeak or the lowest value of SmO2 between CG (193.1 ± 7.2 bpm; 42.4 ± 30.3%) and NL (195.4 ± 8.9 bpm; 47.0 ± 29.2%).

Conclusions: This pilot study suggests that assessment of aerobic capacity in soldiers should be conducted with combat gear to help determine their actual work capacity during combat and other load carrying tasks. These results suggest that if soldiers’ work performance is determined without added load it overestimates their aerobic capacity (VO2peak) in tasks wearing combat gear, which might lead to added fatigability and deleterious effect on performance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
European College of Sport Science, 2019
National Category
Other Medical Sciences not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-40393 (URN)978-3-9818414-2-8 (ISBN)
Conference
24th Annual Congress of the European College of Sport Science, ECSS, Prague, Czech Republic, 3-6 July, 2019
Available from: 2019-08-13 Created: 2019-08-13 Last updated: 2019-08-14Bibliographically approved
Parker, J., Hellström, J. & Olsson, M. C. (2019). Differences in kinematics and driver performance in elite female and male golfers. Sports Biomechanics
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Differences in kinematics and driver performance in elite female and male golfers
2019 (English)In: Sports Biomechanics, ISSN 1476-3141, E-ISSN 1752-6116Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to compare swing kinematic differences between women and men and investigate which variables predict clubhead speed (CHS) and carry distance (CD) whilst accounting for individual variation. Methods: Swing kinematics and driver performance data were collected on 20 (10 women) elite golfers (HCP 0.7 ± 1.4). We used Bayesian T-test for between sex comparison of swing kinematics and Bayesian Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) to produce general linear models for CHS and carry distance for elite female and male golfers separately. Results: There was strong evidence that the driver performance variables CHS and CD were decreased in women compared to men, and two kinematic variables; time to arm peak speed downswing and angular wrist peak speed were slower in women. The ANCOVAs identified very strong to overwhelming evidence that participant as a fixed factor was a determinant of CHS for both women and men but was not a determinant of CD. Conclusion: when looking to enhance driver performance among high-level golfers, coaches should be aware that variables that determine CHS and CD differ among women and men and if the aim is to improve CHS coaches should not forget the importance of individual swing characteristics. © 2019 Parker, Hellström & Olsson. Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Abingdon: Routledge, 2019
Keywords
Bayesian inference, clubhead speed, carry distance, golf performance, sex differences
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-41081 (URN)10.1080/14763141.2019.1683221 (DOI)000496368700001 ()31724482 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85075147208 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Knowledge Foundation, 2012/0319
Available from: 2019-12-03 Created: 2019-12-03 Last updated: 2020-04-07
Horwath, O., Paulsen, G., Esping, T., Seynnes, O. & Olsson, M. C. (2019). Isokinetic resistance training combined with eccentric overload improves athletic performance and induces muscle hypertrophy in young ice hockey players.. Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 22(7), 821-826
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Isokinetic resistance training combined with eccentric overload improves athletic performance and induces muscle hypertrophy in young ice hockey players.
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, ISSN 1440-2440, E-ISSN 1878-1861, Vol. 22, no 7, p. 821-826Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: To determine the combined effects of slow isokinetic resistance training and eccentric overload and compare it to traditional resistance training on strength, power, body composition and muscle hypertrophy in young ice hockey players.

DESIGN: Experimental, randomized trial.

METHODS: Twenty-two resistance-trained ice hockey players (18±1year) were assigned to either isokinetic resistance training and eccentric overload (ISO/ECC; n=11) or traditional resistance training (TRAD; n=11). Participants underwent supervised progressive resistance training for 8 weeks (2-3 sessions/week) involving lower body multiple-joint exercises (heavy squats and explosive jump squats). The ISO/ECC group performed their training using a computerized robotic engine system (1080 Quantum synchro, Sweden), whereas the TRAD group performed the same resistance exercises with isotonic loading. Before and after the intervention, participants were evaluated in 1RM back squat, loaded jump squats, sprint- and jump performance, body composition and muscle thickness using ultrasound measurement.

RESULTS: Similar moderate increases in 1RM back squat and power output in the jump squats were found in both the ISO/ECC and TRAD groups (11-17%, P<0.01), whereas only the ISO/ECC group showed improvements in drop jump performance (9.8%, P=0.01). Moreover, similar trivial changes in body composition were observed in both groups, while only the ISO/ECC training group increased muscle thickness in the vastus intermedius (P=0.01) and rectus femoris muscles (P=0.03).

CONCLUSIONS: Both modalities effectively increased maximal strength and power output, whereas isokinetic resistance training, combined with eccentric overload, improved drop jump performance and induced greater muscle hypertrophy than traditional training in young ice hockey players. © 2019 Sports Medicine Australia

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Chatswood: Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Athletes, Body composition, Exercise, Muscle strength, Muscle thickness
National Category
Physiology Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-39214 (URN)10.1016/j.jsams.2018.12.017 (DOI)000477790300015 ()30660559 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85059939515 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Successful injuryfree golf
Funder
Knowledge Foundation, 2012/0319
Available from: 2019-04-09 Created: 2019-04-09 Last updated: 2020-03-24Bibliographically approved
Malmborg, J. S., Bremander, A., Olsson, M. C., Bergman, A.-C., Brorsson, A. S. & Bergman, S. (2019). Worse health status, sleeping problems, and anxiety in 16-year-old students are associated with chronic musculoskeletal pain at three-year follow-up. BMC Public Health, 19(1), Article ID 1565.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Worse health status, sleeping problems, and anxiety in 16-year-old students are associated with chronic musculoskeletal pain at three-year follow-up
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2019 (English)In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 19, no 1, article id 1565Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Chronic musculoskeletal pain is common in adolescents, and it has been shown that adolescents with pain may become young adults with pain. Pain often coincides with psychosomatic symptoms in adults, but little is known about longitudinal associations and predictors of pain in adolescents. The aim was to investigate chronic musculoskeletal pain and its associations with health status, sleeping problems, stress, anxiety, depression, and physical activity in 16-year-old students at baseline, and to identify risk factors using a three-year follow-up.

METHODS: This was a longitudinal study of 256 students attending a Swedish upper secondary school. Questionnaires regarding chronic musculoskeletal pain and distribution of pain (mannequin), health status (EQ-5D-3 L), sleeping problems (Uppsala Sleep Inventory), stress symptoms (single-item question), anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), and physical activity (International Physical Activity Questionnaire) were issued at baseline and follow-up. Student's t-test and chi2 test were used for descriptive statistics and logistic regression analyses were used to study associations between chronic pain and independent variables.

RESULTS: Fifty-two out of 221 students at baseline (23.5%) and 39 out of 154 students at follow-up (25.3%) were categorized as having chronic musculoskeletal pain. Chronic musculoskeletal pain at follow-up was separately associated with reporting of an EQ-5D value below median (OR 4.06, 95% CI 1.83-9.01), severe sleeping problems (OR 3.63, 95% CI 1.69-7.82), and possible anxiety (OR 4.19, 95% CI 1.74-10.11) or probable anxiety (OR 3.82, 95% CI 1.17-12.48) at baseline. Similar results were found for associations between chronic musculoskeletal pain and independent variables at baseline. In multiple logistic regression analysis, chronic musculoskeletal pain at baseline was a predictor of chronic musculoskeletal pain at follow-up (OR 2.99, 95% CI 1.09-8.24, R2 = 0.240).

CONCLUSION: Chronic musculoskeletal pain at baseline was the most important predictor for reporting chronic musculoskeletal pain at the three-year follow-up, but a worse health status, severe sleeping problems, and anxiety also predicted persistence or development of chronic musculoskeletal pain over time. Interventions should be introduced early on by the school health services to promote student health.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: BioMed Central, 2019
Keywords
Adolescent, Anxiety, Chronic musculoskeletal pain, Epidemiology, Health status, Sleep, Student
National Category
Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-41079 (URN)10.1186/s12889-019-7955-y (DOI)000505960700004 ()31771551 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85075688564 (Scopus ID)
Note

The study was supported financially by Halmstad University; The Swedish Rheumatism Association; and Region Halland (grant number HALLAND-469111), Sweden.

Available from: 2019-12-03 Created: 2019-12-03 Last updated: 2020-01-31Bibliographically approved
Malmborg, J., Olsson, M. C., Bergman, S. & Bremander, A. (2018). Musculoskeletal pain and its association with maturity and sports performance in 14-year-old sport school students. BMJ Open Sport & Exercise Medicine, 4(1), Article ID e000395.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Musculoskeletal pain and its association with maturity and sports performance in 14-year-old sport school students
2018 (English)In: BMJ Open Sport & Exercise Medicine, ISSN 2055-7647, Vol. 4, no 1, article id e000395Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: In youth sports, musculoskeletal pain is often studied from the standpoint of sports injuries, but little is known about pain conditions in which athletes still participate. The aim was to study the frequency of pain and associations with maturity offset, health status and sports performance in 14-year-old sport school students.

Methods: Cross-sectional design. One hundred and seventy-eight students (108 boys and 70 girls) completed anthropometric measures for maturity offset (height, weight and sitting height), questionnaires (pain mannequin and EQ-5D for health status) and sports performance tests (sprint, agility, counter-movement jump and grip strength). Differences between groups were analysed with Student’s t-test and analysis of covariance.

Results: Thirty-one students (18.6%) reported infrequent pain, 85 (50.9%) frequent pain and 51 (30.5%) constant pain. Students in the constant pain group had worse health status than those in the infrequent pain group. Boys with constant pain (n=27) had a lower mean maturity offset (–0.38 vs 0.07 years; p=0.03) than boys with infrequent pain (n=22), and pain was associated with worse sports performance. There was no difference in maturity or sports performance between girls with constant pain (n=24) and girls with infrequent pain (n=9).

Conclusion: Musculoskeletal pain is common in sport school students and coincides with worse health status and with a younger biological age in boys. The high prevalence of pain should be acknowledged by coaches and student healthcare workers in order to promote a healthy and sustainable development in young athletes. © Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2018.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2018
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-37488 (URN)10.1136/bmjsem-2018-000395 (DOI)2-s2.0-85050373874 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding: Halmstad University; Spenshult Research and Development Center, Halmstad; Region Halland (grant numbers HALLAND-469111 and HALLAND-639101); and the Mayflower Charity Foundation, Sweden.

Available from: 2018-07-04 Created: 2018-07-04 Last updated: 2020-02-03Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-9337-5113

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