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Olsson, M. CharlotteORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-9337-5113
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Publications (10 of 42) Show all publications
Khan, T., Lundgren, L., Järpe, E., Olsson, M. C. & Wiberg, P. (2019). A Novel Method for Classification of Running Fatigue Using Change-Point Segmentation. Sensors, 19(21), Article ID 4729.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Novel Method for Classification of Running Fatigue Using Change-Point Segmentation
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2019 (English)In: Sensors, ISSN 1424-8220, E-ISSN 1424-8220, Vol. 19, no 21, article id 4729Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Blood lactate accumulation is a crucial fatigue indicator during sports training. Previous studies have predicted cycling fatigue using surface-electromyography (sEMG) to non-invasively estimate lactate concentration in blood. This study used sEMG to predict muscle fatigue while running and proposes a novel method for the automatic classification of running fatigue based on sEMG. Data were acquired from 12 runners during an incremental treadmill running-test using sEMG sensors placed on the vastus-lateralis, vastus-medialis, biceps-femoris, semitendinosus, and gastrocnemius muscles of the right and left legs. Blood lactate samples of each runner were collected every two minutes during the test. A change-point segmentation algorithm labeled each sample with a class of fatigue level as (1) aerobic, (2) anaerobic, or (3) recovery. Three separate random forest models were trained to classify fatigue using 36 frequency, 51 time-domain, and 36 time-event sEMG features. The models were optimized using a forward sequential feature elimination algorithm. Results showed that the random forest trained using distributive power frequency of the sEMG signal of the vastus-lateralis muscle alone could classify fatigue with high accuracy. Importantly for this feature, group-mean ranks were significantly different (p < 0.01) between fatigue classes. Findings support using this model for monitoring fatigue levels during running. © 2019 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Basel: MDPI, 2019
Keywords
surface-electromyography, blood lactate concentration, random forest, running, fatigue
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-40834 (URN)10.3390/s19214729 (DOI)
Funder
Knowledge Foundation
Note

Other funder: Swedish Adrenaline.

Available from: 2019-11-04 Created: 2019-11-04 Last updated: 2019-11-05
Larsson, J., Engberg, A., Turnstedt, M., Dencker, M., Bremander, A. & Olsson, M. C. (2019). Cardiovascular Effects of Load Carriage in Soldiers; A Pilot Study. In: Bunc, V. & Tsolakidis, E. (Ed.), Book of Abstracts of the 24th Annual Congress of the European College of Sport Science – 3rd - 6th July 2019, Prague – Czech Republic: . Paper presented at 24th Annual Congress of the European College of Sport Science, ECSS, Prague, Czech Republic, 3-6 July, 2019 (pp. 422-423). European College of Sport Science
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cardiovascular Effects of Load Carriage in Soldiers; A Pilot Study
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2019 (English)In: Book of Abstracts of the 24th Annual Congress of the European College of Sport Science – 3rd - 6th July 2019, Prague – Czech Republic / [ed] Bunc, V. & Tsolakidis, E., European College of Sport Science , 2019, p. 422-423Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Previous studies have shown that risk of physical fatigue increases if prolonged average work intensity exceeds 50% of oxygen uptake (VO2). In order to avoid persistent fatigue in a work setting, it is important to conduct suitable work capacity analyses. In physically demanding jobs where wearing protective gear and/or external load is mandatory, monitoring of cardiovascular demands through heart rate (HR) is one way to track the workers’ relative effort.  There are limited studies examining effects of load carrying on cardiovascular capacity where it appears that VO2peak differ when soldiers and firefighters are tested with work-related equipment/clothing compared to light clothing. The aim of this pilot study was to investigate effects of load (combat gear) on HR, VO2 and muscle oxygen saturation (SmO2) compared to no load in soldiers during a graded treadmill protocol.

Methods: Eight volunteer army soldiers (1 woman, 7 men) performed a graded treadmill test until exhaustion. All soldiers performed the test twice, once with light clothes and no load (NL) and once with added load, their personal combat gear (CG), with at least 48 h between sessions. The treadmill protocol stages included supine and standing positions, followed by marching speeds of 5.4 km/h and 8 km/h at 0 incline (all 5 min) immediately followed by a set marching speed of 8 km/h with a starting incline of 2 % increasing the incline 2 % every third minute until voluntary exhaustion. Measurements of HR, VO2 and SmO2 were collected continuously and the last 30 s of each stage were averaged and used for statistical analyses (paired t-tests).

Results: The mean added load for all soldiers with CG was 16.8 ± 1.1 kg. All soldiers completed at least 6 stages (range 6-11 stages) with both NL and CG, where time to exhaustion with NL was longer (19.1 ± 3.2 min) compared to CG (9.1 ± 2.9 min; p <0.01). Submaximal HR and VO2 were both significantly higher with CG compared to NL (at absolute intensities) at all marching speeds all soldiers completed (5.4 km/h 0 % grade - 8 km/h 4% grade; all p<0.05). For SmO2, marching with CG compared to NL resulted in increased muscle oxygen utilization, at submaximal stages 8 km/h 0% -4% grade (all p<0.05). For values at maximal effort the CG had a significantly lower VO2peak (3.7 ± 0.5 L/min) compared to NL (4.1 ± 0.6 L/min, p <0.01), whereas there was no difference in HRpeak or the lowest value of SmO2 between CG (193.1 ± 7.2 bpm; 42.4 ± 30.3%) and NL (195.4 ± 8.9 bpm; 47.0 ± 29.2%).

Conclusions: This pilot study suggests that assessment of aerobic capacity in soldiers should be conducted with combat gear to help determine their actual work capacity during combat and other load carrying tasks. These results suggest that if soldiers’ work performance is determined without added load it overestimates their aerobic capacity (VO2peak) in tasks wearing combat gear, which might lead to added fatigability and deleterious effect on performance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
European College of Sport Science, 2019
National Category
Other Medical Sciences not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-40393 (URN)978-3-9818414-2-8 (ISBN)
Conference
24th Annual Congress of the European College of Sport Science, ECSS, Prague, Czech Republic, 3-6 July, 2019
Available from: 2019-08-13 Created: 2019-08-13 Last updated: 2019-08-14Bibliographically approved
Horwath, O., Paulsen, G., Esping, T., Seynnes, O. & Olsson, M. C. (2019). Isokinetic resistance training combined with eccentric overload improves athletic performance and induces muscle hypertrophy in young ice hockey players.. Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 22(7), 821-826
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Isokinetic resistance training combined with eccentric overload improves athletic performance and induces muscle hypertrophy in young ice hockey players.
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, ISSN 1440-2440, E-ISSN 1878-1861, Vol. 22, no 7, p. 821-826Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: To determine the combined effects of slow isokinetic resistance training and eccentric overload and compare it to traditional resistance training on strength, power, body composition and muscle hypertrophy in young ice hockey players.

DESIGN: Experimental, randomized trial.

METHODS: Twenty-two resistance-trained ice hockey players (18±1year) were assigned to either isokinetic resistance training and eccentric overload (ISO/ECC; n=11) or traditional resistance training (TRAD; n=11). Participants underwent supervised progressive resistance training for 8 weeks (2-3 sessions/week) involving lower body multiple-joint exercises (heavy squats and explosive jump squats). The ISO/ECC group performed their training using a computerized robotic engine system (1080 Quantum synchro, Sweden), whereas the TRAD group performed the same resistance exercises with isotonic loading. Before and after the intervention, participants were evaluated in 1RM back squat, loaded jump squats, sprint- and jump performance, body composition and muscle thickness using ultrasound measurement.

RESULTS: Similar moderate increases in 1RM back squat and power output in the jump squats were found in both the ISO/ECC and TRAD groups (11-17%, P<0.01), whereas only the ISO/ECC group showed improvements in drop jump performance (9.8%, P=0.01). Moreover, similar trivial changes in body composition were observed in both groups, while only the ISO/ECC training group increased muscle thickness in the vastus intermedius (P=0.01) and rectus femoris muscles (P=0.03).

CONCLUSIONS: Both modalities effectively increased maximal strength and power output, whereas isokinetic resistance training, combined with eccentric overload, improved drop jump performance and induced greater muscle hypertrophy than traditional training in young ice hockey players. © 2019 Sports Medicine Australia

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Chatswood: Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Athletes, Body composition, Exercise, Muscle strength, Muscle thickness
National Category
Physiology Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-39214 (URN)10.1016/j.jsams.2018.12.017 (DOI)30660559 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85059939515 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Successful injuryfree golf
Funder
Knowledge Foundation, 2012/0319
Available from: 2019-04-09 Created: 2019-04-09 Last updated: 2019-06-12Bibliographically approved
Malmborg, J., Olsson, M. C., Bergman, S. & Bremander, A. (2018). Musculoskeletal pain and its association with maturity and sports performance in 14-year-old sport school students. BMJ Open Sport & Exercise Medicine, 4(1), Article ID e000395.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Musculoskeletal pain and its association with maturity and sports performance in 14-year-old sport school students
2018 (English)In: BMJ Open Sport & Exercise Medicine, ISSN 2055-7647, Vol. 4, no 1, article id e000395Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: In youth sports, musculoskeletal pain is often studied from the standpoint of sports injuries, but little is known about pain conditions in which athletes still participate. The aim was to study the frequency of pain and associations with maturity offset, health status and sports performance in 14-year-old sport school students.

Methods: Cross-sectional design. One hundred and seventy-eight students (108 boys and 70 girls) completed anthropometric measures for maturity offset (height, weight and sitting height), questionnaires (pain mannequin and EQ-5D for health status) and sports performance tests (sprint, agility, counter-movement jump and grip strength). Differences between groups were analysed with Student’s t-test and analysis of covariance.

Results: Thirty-one students (18.6%) reported infrequent pain, 85 (50.9%) frequent pain and 51 (30.5%) constant pain. Students in the constant pain group had worse health status than those in the infrequent pain group. Boys with constant pain (n=27) had a lower mean maturity offset (–0.38 vs 0.07 years; p=0.03) than boys with infrequent pain (n=22), and pain was associated with worse sports performance. There was no difference in maturity or sports performance between girls with constant pain (n=24) and girls with infrequent pain (n=9).

Conclusion: Musculoskeletal pain is common in sport school students and coincides with worse health status and with a younger biological age in boys. The high prevalence of pain should be acknowledged by coaches and student healthcare workers in order to promote a healthy and sustainable development in young athletes. © Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2018.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2018
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-37488 (URN)10.1136/bmjsem-2018-000395 (DOI)
Note

Funding: Halmstad University; Spenshult Research and Development Center, Halmstad; Region Halland (grant numbers HALLAND-469111 and HALLAND-639101); and the Mayflower Charity Foundation, Sweden.

Available from: 2018-07-04 Created: 2018-07-04 Last updated: 2018-07-05Bibliographically approved
Larsson, J., Olsson, M. C., Denker, M. & Bremander, A. (2018). Self-rated physical work demands for ground combat soldiers. In: PES 2018 3rd International Conference on Physical Employment Standards, University of Portsmouth, United Kingdom, 17-19 July 2018: Conference Book of Abstracts. Paper presented at 3rd International Physical Employment Standards Conference, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth, United Kingdom, July 17-19, 2018 (pp. 31-31).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Self-rated physical work demands for ground combat soldiers
2018 (English)In: PES 2018 3rd International Conference on Physical Employment Standards, University of Portsmouth, United Kingdom, 17-19 July 2018: Conference Book of Abstracts, 2018, p. 31-31Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Military tasks are physically demanding, and the ability to achieve and maintain the physical capacity required to perform all military tasks are important. Previous studies in other countries have identified the most physically demanding work tasks to be carrying, lifting heavy loads, and digging. The aim of the present study was to identify the most physically demanding work tasks for Swedish ground combat soldiers and to study gender differences in perceived difficulty of the tasks.

Methods: Based on procedural documentation, field manuals and job analyses, a questionnaire was developed that defined 30 work tasks for ground combat soldiers. To assess face and content validity, an expert focus group was used. The questionnaire was distributed to 231 ground combat soldiers, 165 of whom responded (71.4%), rating the perceived physical strain of the identified work tasks.

Results: Of the 30 item work tasks included in the survey, five were selected as the most physically demanding. Transport of wounded was rated as the most demanding task both for aerobic endurance and strength. Other highly demanding tasks for aerobic capacity were low/high crawl, dismounted attack in close country, urban and rough terrain, and carrying heavy loads. For muscle strength demands there were a total of 11 different work task ranked for hand-, arm-, leg-, and core strength although many of them only occurred in one of the areas of interest. Carrying heavy loads were ranked in second place except for leg and core strength there it was in third place, instead high and low crawl was ranked very strenuous for leg and core strength. Care of wounded were ranked high for hand strength but not so hard for the rest of the areas.

Conclusions: Swedish ground combat soldiers rate many tasks as physically demanding. Almost all the identified tasks were physically challenging and contains elements of lifting and carrying, which demand personnel’s muscular strength and muscular endurance capabilities for the soldiers. There were no significant differences in ranked physical requirements between male and female soldiers although they sometimes ranked the tasks in different order. 

Keywords
exercise physiology, work demands, ground combat soldiers
National Category
Physiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-39439 (URN)
Conference
3rd International Physical Employment Standards Conference, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth, United Kingdom, July 17-19, 2018
Available from: 2019-05-21 Created: 2019-05-21 Last updated: 2019-10-02
Olsson, C. M., Fälth, J., Ahlebrand, A. & Bremander, A. (2018). Sex-Differences In Bench Press Muscle Activation With Pre-Exhaustion Of Triceps Brachii. In: Conference Abstracts: . Paper presented at ACSM Conference on Integrative Physiology of Exercise, 5-8 September 2018, San Diego, California, USA (pp. 67-68).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sex-Differences In Bench Press Muscle Activation With Pre-Exhaustion Of Triceps Brachii
2018 (English)In: Conference Abstracts, 2018, p. 67-68Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Purpose: Pre-exhaustion is a resistance training method which activates a stronger single-joint muscle to momentary exhaustion directly before a multi-joint exercise including the pre-exhausted muscle. This results in greater recruitment of muscles in the multi-joint exercise to further increase muscle strength. The pre-exhaustion method in bench press has mainly been studied in men and it is uncertain if sex-differences exists. Men are stronger than women in absolute strength, especially in the upper body but if this holds true for upper body relative strength is debated. The purpose was to investigate muscle activity by surface electromyography (EMG) between women and men in bench press with and without pre-exhaustion of triceps brachii (TB) and to compare relative strength in 10RM bench press between the sexes.

Methods: 15 women and 15 men in their 20s with weight lifting experience were recruited to the study. During the first session body composition and 10 repetition maximum (10RM) bench press were determined Participants performed both protocol A and B in a cross-over design on separate days. Protocol A began with 10 RM bench press, five minutes recovery, pre-exhaustion exercise (triceps extensions to failure) immediately followed by a second round of bench press with the same 10RM load as before pre-exhaustion. Protocol B started with triceps extensions to failure immediately before bench press at their before established 10RM, five minutes of recovery then they performed 10RM bench press again. IN both protocols, EMG electrodes were attached to TB), pectoralis major (PM) and deltoideus anterior (DA). EMG values were normalized to maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) and expressed as % MVIC.

Results: Bench press only EMG activity in %MVIC was similar between women and men, but analysis of variance (TB interaction p=0.02) showed that women had higher %MVIC in TB after pre-exhaustion whereas muscle activity decreased in men compared to bench press without pre-exhaustion. Yet, the number of repetitions completed in bench press after pre-exhaustion of TB were the same (women 4.3 ± 2.6 vs men 3.8 ± 2.2; p=0.55). As expected, in 10RM weight men (64.0 ± 7.1 kg) were stronger than women (37.1 ± 6.5 kg; p<0.01), however when related to fat free mass no difference was evident in relative strength between women and men.

Conclusion: Men and women have similar muscle activation patterns during a 10RM bench press, but TB pre-exhaustion followed by a bench press appears to have a greater effect on TB activation in women compared to men. Absolute strength was greater in men, but normalized to fat free mass women and men had similar upper body relative strength.

Keywords
exercise physiology, wellness, health, electromyography
National Category
Physiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-38553 (URN)
Conference
ACSM Conference on Integrative Physiology of Exercise, 5-8 September 2018, San Diego, California, USA
Available from: 2018-12-13 Created: 2018-12-13 Last updated: 2019-01-08Bibliographically approved
Malmborg, J., Bremander, A., Olsson, M. C., Bergman, A.-C., Brorsson, S. & Bergman, S. (2018). Sleeping Problems and Anxiety is Associated to Chronic Multisite Musculoskeletal Pain in Swedish High School Students. Paper presented at Annual European Congress of Rheumatology EULAR, Amsterdam, Netherlands, 13-16 June, 2018. Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, 77(Suppl. 2), 226-226, Article ID OP0361-HPR.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sleeping Problems and Anxiety is Associated to Chronic Multisite Musculoskeletal Pain in Swedish High School Students
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2018 (English)In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 77, no Suppl. 2, p. 226-226, article id OP0361-HPRArticle in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The relationship between chronic multisite musculoskeletal pain (CMP) and sleep is complex, where pain can lead to sleeping problems and lack of sleep can intensify the pain perception. Most previous studies relates to adults, but adolescents may also suffer from CMP, and there is a need for more knowledge regarding the relationships between CMP and sleeping problems, stress, anxiety, depression, and health status.

Objectives: To study background factors associated to CMP in first year Swedish high school students.

Methods: First year Swedish high school students (n=296) were invited to complete questionnaires on chronic pain (mannequin with 18 body regions), sleeping problems (Uppsala Sleep Inventory, four items scored from 1–5), stress (ELO questions, scored from 1–5), anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, scored from 0–21), health status (EQ-5D, scored from 0 to 1, worst to best) and physical activity (International Physical Activity Questionnaire, categorised into low, moderate and high levels). Stress and sleeping items were dichotomized into 1–3 points (best) vs 4–5 points (worst). Individuals scoring at least severe problems (4 points) at one or more sleeping items were classified as having severe sleeping problems. HADS were categorised as non-cases (0–7), possible7–10 and probable cases (11–21 points). Students were grouped as having CMP (pain present in ≥3 regions) or not (no chronic pain or chronic pain in 1–2 regions). Multiple logistic regression analyses (adjusted for sex) with CMP as dependent variable were performed in SPSS, version 24.

Results: 254 students (86% of total sample, 87 boys and 167 girls) with a mean age of 16.1 (SD 0.6) years participated in the study. CMP was present in 25 (9.8%) students with no differences between boys and girls (8.0% vs 10.8%; p=0.488). Having CMP was associated with reporting severe sleeping problems (OR 2.49, 95% CI: 1.06 to 5.81, p=0.035) with initiating sleep, maintaining sleep, early morning awakenings and/or not feeling restored after sleep in comparison to the other students. Students with CMP were more likely to be categorised as probable cases for anxiety (OR 3.06, 95% CI: 1.09 to 8.61, p=0.034), but there were no associations for possible cases for anxiety (OR 1.15, 95% CI: 0.38 to 3.51, p=0.800), possible cases (OR 2.03, 95% CI: 0.63 to 6.54), or probable cases for depression (OR 3.35, 95% CI: 0.33 to 33.83). There was a nearly significant association between stress and belonging to the CMP group (OR 2.31, 95% CI: 0.97 to 5.53, p=0.059). A higher self-reported health status was associated to a lower likelihood for CMP (OR 0.04, 95% CI: 0.01 to 0.27, p=0.001). Distribution of physical activity levels of low, moderate and high was not significantly associated to having CMP in comparison with not having it.

Conclusions: One in ten high school students fulfilled criteria for having chronic multisite musculoskeletal pain. CMP was associated to sleeping problems, anxiety, and a worse health status. The results from this study may be used by school health-care professionals in their preventive work to promote student’s health.

Disclosure of Interest: None declared

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2018
National Category
Clinical Medicine Rheumatology and Autoimmunity
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-36813 (URN)
Conference
Annual European Congress of Rheumatology EULAR, Amsterdam, Netherlands, 13-16 June, 2018
Available from: 2018-05-23 Created: 2018-05-23 Last updated: 2018-07-31Bibliographically approved
Malmborg, J., Olsson, C. M., Bergman, S. & Bremander, A. (2017). Daily Musculoskeletal Pain Affects Health And Sports Performance Negatively In Youth Athletes. Paper presented at American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) Annual Meeting in Denver, Colorado, USA, May 30-June 3, 2017. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 49, 972-972
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Daily Musculoskeletal Pain Affects Health And Sports Performance Negatively In Youth Athletes
2017 (English)In: Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, ISSN 0195-9131, E-ISSN 1530-0315, Vol. 49, p. 972-972Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In sports, musculoskeletal pain (MSP) is often studied from the perspective of sport specific injuries, why little is known about the prevalence of daily or multisite MSP that does not affect participation in sports. It is also unclear if daily or multisite MSP is a risk factor for worse health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and worse sports performance in youth athletes.

PURPOSE: To study how HRQoL and sports performance is affected by daily MSP in youth athletes that are able to participate in sports.

METHODS: 136 Swedish youth athletes attending a sport school (13 to 14 years, boys n=83, girls n=53) completed the EQ-5D measuring HRQoL (range 0 to 1, worst to best), a pain questionnaire including current pain (yes/no), pain in 18 body regions (never to rarely/monthly to weekly/more than once a week to almost daily), and pain intensity in the last week (0 to 10, best to worst), anthropometric measures to estimate biological age, and sports performance tests (grip strength, 20 meter sprint, and countermovement jump(CMJ)).

RESULTS: 109 to 117 of the 136 students answered the different pain questions. 53 of 113 (47%) reported current MSP, and 28 of 109 (26%) experienced MSP ‘more than once a week to almost daily’ from one or more body regions (frequent MSP group), while 28% (n=30) stated ‘never to rarely’ in MSP (no MSP group). Boys in the frequent MSP group reported worse HRQoL, higher pain intensity, performed worse in all sports performance tests, and had a younger biological age than boys in the no MSP group. Girls in the frequent MSP group reported worse HRQoL and higher pain intensity than the girls in the no MSP group. No other differences were found (table).

CONCLUSIONS: Every other youth athlete attending a sport school reported current MSP and one out of four reported almost daily MSP. MSP affects HRQoL negatively in both boys and girls, and sports performance negatively in boys. The prevalence of MSP in youth athletes is concerning since pain in younger ages may predict pain in adult ages.

© 2017 American College of Sports Medicine

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2017
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-34976 (URN)10.1249/01.mss.0000519655.47836.be (DOI)
Conference
American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) Annual Meeting in Denver, Colorado, USA, May 30-June 3, 2017
Available from: 2017-09-15 Created: 2017-09-15 Last updated: 2018-03-23Bibliographically approved
Parker, J., Lagerhem, C., Hellström, J. & Olsson, C. M. (2017). Effects of nine weeks isokinetic training on power, golf kinematics, and driver performance in pre-elite golfers. BMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation, 9, Article ID 21.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of nine weeks isokinetic training on power, golf kinematics, and driver performance in pre-elite golfers
2017 (English)In: BMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation, ISSN 2052-1847, Vol. 9, article id 21Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

It has previously been shown that isotonic strength training can improve driver performance among golfers, though few studies have investigated effects of strength training on swing kinematics together with driver performance. In this study we investigated whether isokinetic rotational training could improve driver performance and swing kinematic variables amongst elite golfers.

Methods

Twenty competitive pre-elite golfers (handicap better than −3.0), 13 men and 7 women, were split into two groups, one group received the isokinetic power training (IK) alongside their normal isotonic pre-season strength-training and the other group continued with their normal isotonic pre-season strength-training regime (IT). The IK group completed 12 sessions of isokinetic power training on a standing rotation exercise (10% body weight at 1 m/s) and barbell squat (25 kg plus 10% body weight at 0.5 m/s). The IT group continued with their normal isotonic pre-season strength-training regime. Participants were tested for rotational power, lower body power, golf swing kinematics, and driver performance before and after a nine-week training period.

Results

After the nine-week training period both the IK and the IT groups increased their dominant side rotational force and power (effect sizes between 0.50–0.96) and magnitude based inference indicated that IK had a likely (> 80%) more beneficial increase in dominant side rotational force and power. For swing kinematics, IK had a likely (> 80%) more beneficial improvement in lead arm speed and acceleration compared to the IT group. For driver performance, IK had a possible (65%) beneficial effect on ball speed and likely (78%) beneficial effect on carry distance when compared to IT, whereas neither of the groups improved club head speed.

Conclusion

In the present study on pre-elite golfers we found that 9 weeks of isokinetic training increased seated rotational force and power, peak arm speed and arm acceleration, ball speed, and carry distance more compared to isotonic training. Even though isokinetic training did not increase CHS, it did result in greater carry distance. © The Author(s). 2017

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: BioMed Central, 2017
Keywords
Golf biomechanics, Isokinetic training, PowerDriver performance, Kinematics, Performance gains
National Category
Other Natural Sciences Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-35843 (URN)10.1186/s13102-017-0086-9 (DOI)000417565100002 ()29238597 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85037710214 (Scopus ID)
Projects
KK-HÖG projekt successful injury-free golf
Funder
Knowledge Foundation, 2012/0319
Available from: 2017-12-13 Created: 2017-12-13 Last updated: 2018-10-29Bibliographically approved
Olsson, C. M., Bernhardsson, L. & Bremander, A. (2017). Electromyographic Analysis of Left and Right Side Gluteus Medius in Unilateral and Bilateral Bodyweight Exercises. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 49(5S), 464-465
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Electromyographic Analysis of Left and Right Side Gluteus Medius in Unilateral and Bilateral Bodyweight Exercises
2017 (English)In: Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, ISSN 0195-9131, E-ISSN 1530-0315, Vol. 49, no 5S, p. 464-465Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2017
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-33239 (URN)10.1249/01.mss.0000518162.76627.32 (DOI)
Funder
Knowledge Foundation, 2012/0319
Available from: 2017-02-08 Created: 2017-02-08 Last updated: 2017-07-04Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-9337-5113

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