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Ekengren, J., Stambulova, N., Johnson, U., Carlsson, I.-M. & Ryba, T. (2019). Composite vignettes of Swedish male and female professional handball players’ career paths. Sport in Society: Cultures, Media, Politics, Commerce, 22(6)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Composite vignettes of Swedish male and female professional handball players’ career paths
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2019 (English)In: Sport in Society: Cultures, Media, Politics, Commerce, ISSN 1743-0437, E-ISSN 1743-0445, Vol. 22, no 6Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to describe gender-specific career paths of Swedish professional handball players. A reanalysis of Ekengren et al. (2018) career interviews with nine male and nine female players led to creating two composite vignettes using the athletes’ own words, accounted for typical features in the male and female players’ career paths. Seven themes were identified in the analysis of the men’s transcripts and eight themes derived from the women’s transcripts. Further, the themes of both vignettes were aligned with career stages described in our previous study (Ekengren et al. 2018). The male players’ vignette is interpreted as a performance narrative congruent with elite handball culture that promotes performance success and profitable professional contracts. The female players’ vignette is more holistic, embracing handball, studies, motherhood, and how they ought to be as Swedish women. Recommendations for future research are provided. © 2019 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Abingdon: Routledge, 2019
Keywords
Career development, creative analytical practice, cultural praxis of athletes’ careers, gender, handball, vignettes
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-39272 (URN)10.1080/17430437.2019.1599201 (DOI)
Funder
Swedish National Centre for Research in Sports, F2015-0018
Note

Other funders: The Swedish Research Council for Sport Science, Swedish Handball Federation & Halmstad University

Available from: 2019-04-25 Created: 2019-04-25 Last updated: 2019-10-16
Mirskaya, M., Lindgren, E.-C. & Carlsson, I.-M. (2019). Ruined active life: Experiences of fertile women with symptomatic pelvic organ prolapse in daily physical active life. In: : . Paper presented at International Continence Society (ICS) 2019, Gothenburg, Sweden, September 3-6, 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ruined active life: Experiences of fertile women with symptomatic pelvic organ prolapse in daily physical active life
2019 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Background: Pelvic organ prolapse (POP) is a major public health problem. Symptomatic POP (sPOP) affects quality of life and implies an increased risk for surgery. Many women become symptomatic later in life. Existing research on sPOP predominantly concentrates on the effects of the condition on postmenopausal women. However, bothersome symptoms of POP may occur shortly after delivery. This paper provides insight into fertile women's daily physical active lives in order to better understand their situation and improve care for this group.

Aim: To explore how fertile women with symptomatic POP after vaginal delivery experience their daily physical active life.

Methods: An inductive, text-driven approach was taken, selecting thread posts from an internet forum written by 33 women. The data presented in this article stem from a larger empirical data that explored fertile women's experiences of symptomatic POP after vaginal delivery (VD). Data were processed using qualitative content analysis. The data consisted of chains of questions and answers or comments on the topic of sPOP, posted on an online forum by fertile women who had experienced sPOP after VD.          

Results: The theme “Ruined active life” showed that many of the fertile women experienced that their lives were ruined because of unexpected physical limitations caused by sPOP. They found themselves balancing being a parent and being disabled because of sPOP. Bothersome symptoms like vaginal heaviness, fullness, soreness and pain were aggravated by many basic daily activities, generating fear that any action involving physical activity might worsen the situation. The women were extremely scared that doing daily household chores and parenting, e.g. lifting and carrying the baby or using a carrycot, might aggravate the symptoms. Moreover, this fear restricted women from playing active games with their older children, such as helping them onto a swing, teaching them to ride a bike, and jumping on a trampoline. All these restrictions led to feelings of being inadequate mothers, resulting in frustration, sadness, anger, uncertainty and a growing sense of hopelessness.Another substantial result of this study addresses sport activities. For many fertile women, sports activities had played an important role before delivery, and now sPOP restricted them from it. The realisation that they could not continue engaging in sports at the same level of athletic performance as before delivery led to intense grief, anxiety and frustration. For instance, women had to give up running and high-intensity training. Some of them did not dare to participate in any activities at the gym. One of them had to quit her job as a training instructor. Giving up favourite activities that were a part of the women’s identity caused an identity crisis, leading to depression. They often expressed that they “just wanted their life back”, demonstrating an inability to accept the new situation. Discussions concerning exercise and safe workouts were very common in the thread. Women were desperate to find information and sought advice from healthcare providers regarding lifestyle changes and how to adjust physical activity in relation to sPOP. However, it was found to be difficult to access satisfactory, unambiguous information. Instead, information was inconsistent, unclear and difficult to understand. Although some healthcare providers were considered helpful and kind, unfortunately they lacked knowledge, which led to useless advice being given which often was not in line with the information that the women had found out by themselves from independent sources. For instance, one woman was encouraged to continue with life as usual and with exercises such as doing sit-ups in spite of her complaints about aggravating her symptoms by physical activity. The woman was told that “nothing would fall out” and in any case if it did happen she was in no danger. Moreover, the fertile women who sought professional help expressed that normalisation of sPOP as a condition was common among healthcare providers. On the contrary, women did not perceive the symptoms of POP as normal or natural, and the attitude of healthcare professionals was experienced as humiliating and discouraging and caused feelings of not being taken seriously. This led to mistrust, disappointment, frustration and criticism of healthcare professionals and the system.

Discussion: The fertile women in this study experienced failure to carry out their parental responsibilities, both physically and emotionally. Fear that activities such as lifting children or playing active games with them might worsen the symptoms led to emotional imbalance. This worry has reasonable grounds, owing to an assumption that increased load to the pelvic floor in the form of elevated intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) contributes to development of POP. It has also been shown that IAP increases during brisk walking and as a result of carrying things in a front carry position, which is used by postpartum women to carry their babies in car seats (1).

One of the main findings of this study was psychological suffering due to an inability to participate in high-intensity exercise, since for some women, exercise was a part of self-esteem and a natural part of life. It is well established that physical activity has positive effects on health. Moreover, moderate or vigorous physical activity such as brisk walking, cycling, tennis, swimming and running has been shown to reduce depressive symptoms postpartum (2). Some of the fertile women in this study suffered from anxiety and depression and would probably have benefited from participating in physical activity. However, they felt unsure about what kind of physical activities they could resume without worsening their symptoms and became disappointed when they faced a lack of understanding and competence among healthcare professionals in terms of advising suitable exercises. Likely recommendations regarding leisure-time physical activity for postpartum women with depression without sPOP must differ from those with sPOP. One such physical activity that has been found to be suitable for women with sPOP is basic Pilates exercises, which does not raise IAP and, for instance, is safe to recommend for women after POP surgery (3).

Conclusion and clinical implications: This study demonstrates that sPOP has a significant impact on fertile women’s active life. sPOP restricts daily and sports activities and affects the ability to fulfil everyday parental duties. In addition, the lack of information from healthcare providers regarding suitable physical activities adds more emotional stress and worsens the situation. It is of the utmost importance to acknowledge this problem. There is a need to develop guidelines for management of sPOP after VD, including information regarding safe lifting techniques and suitable exercises. Copyright © ICS 2019.

Keywords
pelvic organ prolapse, prolapse symptoms, quality of life
National Category
Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-39744 (URN)
Conference
International Continence Society (ICS) 2019, Gothenburg, Sweden, September 3-6, 2019
Available from: 2019-06-13 Created: 2019-06-13 Last updated: 2019-09-09
Hansson, M., Lundgren, I., Hensing, G. & Carlsson, I.-M. (2019). Veiled midwifery in the baby factory: A grounded theory study. Women and Birth, 32(1), 80-86
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Veiled midwifery in the baby factory: A grounded theory study
2019 (English)In: Women and Birth, ISSN 1871-5192, E-ISSN 1878-1799, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 80-86Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Midwives' professional role has been changing drastically over time, from handling births in home settings to being part of a team in labour wards in hospitals. This demands a greater effort of interprofessional collaboration in childbirth care.

AIM: Explore midwives' work in a hospital-based labour ward from the perspectives of other professions, working in the same ward.

METHOD: Classical grounded theory, using a constant comparative analysis, was applied to focus group interviews with obstetricians, assistant nurses and managers to explore their views of midwifery work during childbirth.

FINDINGS: The substantive theory of 'veiled midwifery' emerged as an explanation of the social process between the professions in the 'baby factory' context. The other professionals perceive midwifery through a veil that filters the reality and only permits fragmentary images of the midwives' work. The main concern for the other professions was that the midwives were 'marching to own drum'. The midwives were perceived as both in dissonance with the baby factory, and therefore hard to control, or, alternatively more compliant with the prevailing rhythm. This caused an unpredictability and led to feelings of frustration and exclusion. Which in turn resulted in attempts to cooperate and gain access to the midwifery world, by using three unveiling strategies: Streamlining, Scrutinising and Collaborating admittance.

CONCLUSIONS: Findings provide a theoretical conceptualisation of a 'veiled midwifery 'that causes problems for the surrounding team. This generates a desire to streamline and control midwifery in order to increase interprofessional collaboration. © 2018 The Authors

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Assembly line, Interprofessional collaboration, Labour care, Midwifery, Work situation
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-37132 (URN)10.1016/j.wombi.2018.04.012 (DOI)000455681800029 ()29709432 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85046151025 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-06-18 Created: 2018-06-18 Last updated: 2019-01-25Bibliographically approved
Hansson, M., Lundgren, I., Hensing, G. & Carlsson, I.-M. (2019). Veiled midwifery in the baby factory — A grounded theory study. Paper presented at Improving Maternal Health- From Evidence into Action, Dublin, Ireland, October 23, 2018. Women and Birth, 32(1), 80-86
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Veiled midwifery in the baby factory — A grounded theory study
2019 (English)In: Women and Birth, ISSN 1871-5192, E-ISSN 1878-1799, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 80-86Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Midwives’ professional role has been changing drastically over time, from handling births in home settings to being part of a team in labour wards in hospitals. This demands a greater effort of interprofessional collaboration in childbirth care.

Aim: Explore midwives’ work in a hospital-based labour ward from the perspectives of other professions, working in the same ward.

Method: Classical grounded theory, using a constant comparative analysis, was applied to focus group interviews with obstetricians, assistant nurses and managers to explore their views of midwifery work during childbirth.

Findings: The substantive theory of ‘veiled midwifery’ emerged as an explanation of the social process between the professions in the ‘baby factory’ context. The other professionals perceive midwifery through a veil that filters the reality and only permits fragmentary images of the midwives’ work. The main concern for the other professions was that the midwives were ‘marching to own drum’. The midwives were perceived as both in dissonance with the baby factory, and therefore hard to control, or, alternatively more compliant with the prevailing rhythm. This caused an unpredictability and led to feelings of frustration and exclusion. Which in turn resulted in attempts to cooperate and gain access to the midwifery world, by using three unveiling strategies: Streamlining, Scrutinising and Collaborating admittance.

Conclusions: Findings provide a theoretical conceptualisation of a ‘veiled midwifery ‘that causes problems for the surrounding team. This generates a desire to streamline and control midwifery in order to increase interprofessional collaboration. © 2018 The Authors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Midwifery, Assembly line, Labour care, Interprofessional collaboration, Work situation
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-40641 (URN)10.1016/j.wombi.2018.04.012 (DOI)000455681800029 ()29709432 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85046151025 (Scopus ID)
Conference
Improving Maternal Health- From Evidence into Action, Dublin, Ireland, October 23, 2018
Available from: 2019-09-27 Created: 2019-09-27 Last updated: 2019-10-01Bibliographically approved
Larsson, I., Nyman, C., Svedberg, P., Nygren, J. M. & Carlsson, I.-M. (2018). Children and young people’s participation in developing interventions in health and well-being: a scoping review. BMC Health Services Research, 18(507)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Children and young people’s participation in developing interventions in health and well-being: a scoping review
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2018 (English)In: BMC Health Services Research, ISSN 1472-6963, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 18, no 507Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Greater interest is being shown in participatory approaches, especially in research on interventions that concern children and young people'shealth and well-being. Although participatory approaches have user involvement in common, they differ in terms of the explicit guidance on how to actually involve and engage children and young people in health research. The aim of this scoping review was to systematically map recent research involving children and young people in the development of interventions targeting issues of health and well-being. Methods: An interpretative scoping literature review based on: a scientific literature search in (health and social science) databases, reference lists, a manual search in key journals and contact with existing networks was conducted. A total of 4458 references were identified through the literature search, of which 41 studies published between 2000 and 2017 were included in the review. The target population was children and young people under 25 years old. Level of participation was categorized according to Shier's Pathways to Participation Model. Results: The review showed that participatory approaches were most often used in the development of interventions in school settings and in community and healthcare settings and on issues concerning support in lifestyle or in managing illness or disease. The level of participation varied from children and young people taking part just as active informants, through stages of greater participation both in quantitative and qualitative terms, to children and youngpeople becoming an active agent involved as a co-researcher where the research process was shaped by views of a higher level of mutuality. Most of the studies were categorised at a medium level and only three studies were judged to involve the children and young people at the highest level. Conclusions: This scoping review showed that work remains in enabling children and young people to influence the development of interventions targeting health and well-being. In relation to level of sustainability in the interventions, it is relevant that goals, strategies and processes are formulated by those who can gain from the interventions. Participatory approaches aiming for a higher level of participation where children and young people work together with the researchers in partnerships are thus warranted. © 2018 The Author(s).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: BioMed Central, 2018
Keywords
Children, Intervention, Participatory approach, Scoping review, User involvement, Young people
National Category
Other Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-38203 (URN)10.1186/s12913-018-3219-2 (DOI)000436841600004 ()29954392 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85049212510 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agency: Centre of Welfare, Health and Sports at Halmstad University

Available from: 2018-10-23 Created: 2018-10-23 Last updated: 2018-10-24Bibliographically approved
Blomqvist, M., Sandgren, A., Carlsson, I.-M. & Jormfeldt, H. (2018). Enabling healthy living: Experiences of people with severe mental illness in psychiatric outpatient services. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, 27(1), 236-246
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Enabling healthy living: Experiences of people with severe mental illness in psychiatric outpatient services
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1445-8330, E-ISSN 1447-0349, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 236-246Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

It is well known that people with severe mental illness have a reduced life expectancy and a greater risk of being affected by preventable physical illnesses such as metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. There are still, however, only a few published studies focusing on what enables healthy living for this group. This study thus aimed to describe what enables healthy living among people with severe mental illness in psychiatric outpatient services. The data were collected in qualitative interviews (n = 16) and content analysis was used to analyze the data. The interviews resulted in an overall theme "Being regarded as a whole human being by self and others", which showed the multidimensional nature of health and the issues that enable healthy living among people with severe mental illness. Three categories emerged: (i) everyday structure (ii), motivating life events and (iii) support from significant others. The results indicate that a person with severe mental illness needs to be encountered as a whole person if healthy living is to be enabled. Attaining healthy living requires collaboration between the providers of care, help and support. Health care organizations need to work together to develop and provide interventions to enable healthy living and to reduce poor physical health among people with severe mental illness. © 2017 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Richmond, VIC: Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Inc., 2018
Keywords
healthy living, mental health nursing, patient's experiences, qualitative content analysis, severe mental illness
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-33586 (URN)10.1111/inm.12313 (DOI)28160392 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85013104680 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding: The regional Council for Medical Health Care Research, County of Halland, Sweden and the regional Council for Medical Health Care Research, County of Kronoberg, Sweden.

Available from: 2017-03-20 Created: 2017-03-20 Last updated: 2018-01-19Bibliographically approved
Jormfeldt, H. & Carlsson, I.-M. (2018). Equine-Assisted Therapeutic Interventions Among Individuals Diagnosed With Schizophrenia. A Systematic Review. Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 39(8), 647-656
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Equine-Assisted Therapeutic Interventions Among Individuals Diagnosed With Schizophrenia. A Systematic Review
2018 (English)In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 39, no 8, p. 647-656Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Persons diagnosed with schizophrenia are not sufficiently offered health promotion interventions, notwithstanding their increased risk of bodily ill health. Physical activity is found to improve health and decrease psychiatric symptoms although, there is a challenge to motivate and increase physical activity in people with schizophrenia and innovative evidence-based treatment interventions are needed. The aim was to systematically review studies concerning equine assisted interventions among individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia. The findings of the six included articles indicate that therapeutic equine assisted interventions could be beneficial for individuals with severe mental illness such as schizophrenia or schizophrenia like disorders.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Philadelphia: Taylor & Francis, 2018
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-37134 (URN)10.1080/01612840.2018.1440450 (DOI)29509053 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-06-18 Created: 2018-06-18 Last updated: 2019-02-05Bibliographically approved
Ekengren, J., Stambulova, N., Johnson, U. & Carlsson, I.-M. (2018). Exploring career experiences of Swedish professional handball players: Consolidating firsthand information into an empirical career model. International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring career experiences of Swedish professional handball players: Consolidating firsthand information into an empirical career model
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, ISSN 1612-197X, E-ISSN 1557-251XArticle in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

The study was aimed at developing the empirical career model of Swedish professional handball players by means of exploring their career experiences in athletic and non-athletic developments through the lens of the holistic athletic career model. Eighteen Swedish professional handball players (nine men and nine women), who had recently terminated or were finishing their careers took part in semi-structured interviews about their careers from the beginning to the end with an interest in both athletic and non-athletic developments. Thematic analysis initially focused on identifying the handball career structure (i.e. stages and sub-stages). Then, the interviews were analysed inductively to identify shared themes in the players’ experiences relevant to each career stage. These themes were incorporated in the relevant stages, and the empirical career model of Swedish professional handball players (further – the empirical model) was finalised. The empirical model describes careers of Swedish handball players as having four athletic stages – initiation, development (with three sub-stages), mastery (with four sub-stages), and discontinuation – complemented by players’ psychological, psychosocial, academic/vocational, and financial developments. Each stage is also aligned with age markers and contains themes describing players’ career experiences from the holistic perspective. The empirical model contributes to contextualised career research and serves as a basis for developing career-long psychological support services in Swedish handball including player/coach/parent education organised by the Swedish Handball Federation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Taylor & Francis, 2018
Keywords
athletic career, empirical career model, handball, holistic developmental perspective
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-37469 (URN)10.1080/1612197X.2018.1486872 (DOI)
Funder
Swedish National Centre for Research in Sports, F2015-0018
Note

Funding: the Swedish Research Council for Sport Science, Swedish Handball Federation, and Halmstad University.

Available from: 2018-07-03 Created: 2018-07-03 Last updated: 2018-07-05
Blomqvist, M., Ivarsson, A., Carlsson, I.-M., Sandgren, A. & Jormfeldt, H. (2018). Health Risks among People with Severe Mental Illness in Psychiatric Outpatient Settings. Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 39(7), 585-591
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Health Risks among People with Severe Mental Illness in Psychiatric Outpatient Settings
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2018 (English)In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 39, no 7, p. 585-591Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Life expectancy is greatly reduced in patients with schizophrenia, and cardiovascular diseases are a leading cause of mortality. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the prevalence of overweight, obesity, and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk and to investigate the relationships between self-rated health, sense of coherence, CVD risk, and body mass index (BMI) among people with severe mental illness (SMI) in psychiatric outpatient settings. Nearly 50% of the participants were exposed to moderate/high risk of CVD and over 50% were obese. The results showed no statistically relationships between the subjective and objective measures (Bayes factor <1) of health. The integration of physical health into clinical psychiatric nursing practice is vital. © 2018 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Philadelphia: Taylor & Francis, 2018
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-36441 (URN)10.1080/01612840.2017.1422200 (DOI)000445651800007 ()29446657 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85042136613 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding: the regional Council for Medical Health Care Research, County of Halland, Sweden and the regional Council for Medical Health Care Research, County of Kronoberg, Sweden.

Available from: 2018-03-15 Created: 2018-03-15 Last updated: 2018-12-17Bibliographically approved
Hansson, M., Lundgren, I., Hensing, G. & Carlsson, I.-M. (2018). Midwives marching to own drum in the Baby Factory - other professions perspectives of midwifery work in labour wards. In: : . Paper presented at COST Action BIRTH Conference, Lisbon, Portugal, September 17-18, 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Midwives marching to own drum in the Baby Factory - other professions perspectives of midwifery work in labour wards
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

There has been a paradigm shift in midwifery over time where different professions now work together in childbirth care. There is little research on midwives’ work from other professionals’ perspectives, which is of importance to improve midwives work situation and women-centred care. Therefore, the aim of this article was to explore other professions´ views of midwifery work during childbirth. Classical Grounded Theory, using a constant comparative analysis, was applied to focus group interviews with obstetricians, assistant nurses and managers to explore their views of midwifery work during childbirth. The substantive theory of ‘veiled midwifery’ emerged as an explanation of the social process between the professions in the ‘baby factory’ context. The other professionals perceive midwifery through a veil that filters the reality and only permits fragmentary images of the midwives´ work. The main concern for the other professions was that the midwives were ‘marching to own drum’. The midwives were perceived as both in dissonance with the baby factory, and therefore hard to control, or, alternatively more compliant with the prevailing rhythm. This caused an unpredictability and led to feelings of frustration and exclusion. Which in turn resulted in attempts to cooperate and gain access to the midwifery world, by using three unveiling strategies: Streamlining, Scrutinising and Collaborating admittance. The theory of veiled midwifery could be used as a theoretical basis for future studies, and could be a foundation for a dialogue of philosophical differences in the way birth is viewed in the clinical setting, to improve the work situation.

Keywords
Midwifery, Assembly line, Labour care, Interprofessional collaboration, Work situation
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-40642 (URN)
Conference
COST Action BIRTH Conference, Lisbon, Portugal, September 17-18, 2018
Available from: 2019-09-27 Created: 2019-09-27 Last updated: 2019-10-04
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-8354-3382

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