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Ivarsson, Andreas
Publications (10 of 95) Show all publications
Li, C., Ivarsson, A., Lam, L. & Sun, J. (2019). Basic Psychological Needs Satisfaction and Frustration, Stress, and Sports Injury among University Athletes: A Four-Wave Prospective Survey. Frontiers in Psychology, 10, Article ID 665.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Basic Psychological Needs Satisfaction and Frustration, Stress, and Sports Injury among University Athletes: A Four-Wave Prospective Survey
2019 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 10, article id 665Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The prevalence of sports injury among athletes is rather high, suggesting the need to better understand the causes of sports injury, including the risk factors, for preventive purposes. Grounded in Basic Psychological Needs Theory (BPNT) and the Model of Stress and Athletic Injury, the aim of this four-wave prospective survey study was to investigate the relationships among basic psychological needs satisfaction and frustration, stress responses, and sports injury. Study variables, including basic psychological need satisfaction/frustration, and perceived stress, were measured using a survey from 112 university athletes at the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd months of the study. Sports injury was assessed using a self-report form at the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th months of study. Results of the Bayesian multilevel analysis showed that basic psychological need satisfaction negatively predicted sports injuries, whereas stress was a positive predictor. In addition, basic psychological need satisfaction had an indirect effect on injury occurrence via stress. However, basic psychological need frustration did not predict sports injury. BPNT is a viable model to provide additional explanations to psychological risk factors of injury. Intervention programs may be formulated based on the evidence obtained on the model. © 2019 Li, Ivarsson, Lam and Sun.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lausanne: Frontiers Media S.A., 2019
Keywords
Athlete, injury, self-determination theory, longitudinal design, stress
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-39043 (URN)10.3389/fpsyg.2019.00665 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-03-12 Created: 2019-03-12 Last updated: 2019-03-27Bibliographically approved
Ziegert, K., Karlsson, S., Kristén, L. & Ivarsson, A. (2019). Dancing Together for Social Sustainability from a Life Course Perspective - Integrating Children and Senior Citizens in Action Research Project. In: : . Paper presented at IAGG-ER 2019, International Association of Gerontology, Gothenburg, Sweden, 23rd - 25th May, 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dancing Together for Social Sustainability from a Life Course Perspective - Integrating Children and Senior Citizens in Action Research Project
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This project has its starting-point in dance project with children and senior citizens. Children and senior citizen have their own health challenges. The Swedish culture does not encourage intergenerational activities in organizations and communities. Intergenerational contacts are in many terms referred to within families, except certain environments such as the educational institutions. Especially, the intergenerational contacts between children and senior citizens are neglected as an important factor in promoting knowledge and health in society. It does not need to be questioned, that both knowledge and health contributes to the sustainability in society. If individuals from different generations have the opportunity to exercise physical activities together, it is likely that it generates positive values for social sustainability. Social constructivism combined with a life course perspective is the fundamental theoretical standpoint for this project.  We will explain the complex matter of how theses processes of “constructed realities” are accomplish before approaching the central ideas of social constructivism in relation to our project.

The overall aim was to understand the knowledge of the social value of intergenerational physical activities, and how different age groups communicate their experiences in a life course perspective. There were many things we could learn in a life course perspective through activities among children and senior citizens, and how we could make use of this knowledge for implementations for social sustainability in general. This study included a three-stage process qualitative data from 48 stakeholders describing in individuals diaries about daily exercise, collected during one and a half year, with focus groups interviews with 24 children and 24 senior citizens. The third stage dancing activities was conducted, and follow up interviews with both participants. The thematic analysis was used emerge the results. We found a common joy for both children and senior citizens when performing the physical activities. Women believed physical activities improved their inclusion and social networks. The men found that the physical activities improved their wellbeing and health.

National Category
Other Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-39502 (URN)
Conference
IAGG-ER 2019, International Association of Gerontology, Gothenburg, Sweden, 23rd - 25th May, 2019
Available from: 2019-05-28 Created: 2019-05-28 Last updated: 2019-05-29Bibliographically approved
Ingrell, J., Johnson, U. & Ivarsson, A. (2019). Developmental changes in burnout perceptions among student-athletes: An achievement goal perspective. International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 17(5), 509-520
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Developmental changes in burnout perceptions among student-athletes: An achievement goal perspective
2019 (English)In: International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, ISSN 1612-197X, E-ISSN 1557-251X, Vol. 17, no 5, p. 509-520Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study examined (a) the developmental trajectories of student-athlete burnout perceptions and (b) the within-person relationship between achievement goals and burnout perceptions. A three-year and six-wave longitudinal study was conducted with 78 student-athletes (30 young women and 48 young men, Mage at T1 = 12.7 years, SD = 0.44), attending a sport compulsory school. The Athlete Burnout Questionnaire and the Task and Ego Orientation in Sport Questionnaire were used. The results from multilevel growth models revealed that burnout perceptions increased for this age group over the three-year period. Furthermore, task orientation was significantly and negatively related to a reduced sense of accomplishment and sport devaluation. The results from this study underline the advantage of considering developmental processes when studying burnout. Furthermore, by focusing on the within-person effect of achievement goals, this study provides findings that support a motivational approach to the longitudinally study of burnout propensity among young student-athletes. The current study suggests that sport school staff should be aware of their student-athletes’ burnout perceptions and that these could change over time. Results also highlights that task-oriented goals might help decrease burnout perceptions, specifically reduced sense of accomplishment and sport devaluation. © 2018 International Society of Sport Psychology

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York, NY: Taylor & Francis, 2019
Keywords
achievement goals, adolescents, burnout, school sport, student-athlete
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-36308 (URN)10.1080/1612197X.2017.1421679 (DOI)2-s2.0-85040984492 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-02-16 Created: 2018-02-16 Last updated: 2019-08-12Bibliographically approved
Josefsson, T., Ivarsson, A., Gustafsson, H., Stenling, A., Lindwall, M., Tornberg, R. & Böröy, J. (2019). Effects of Mindfulness-Acceptance-Commitment (MAC) on Sport-Specific Dispositional Mindfulness, Emotion Regulation, and Self-Rated Athletic Performance in a Multiple-Sport Population: an RCT Study. Mindfulness, 10(8), 1518-1529
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of Mindfulness-Acceptance-Commitment (MAC) on Sport-Specific Dispositional Mindfulness, Emotion Regulation, and Self-Rated Athletic Performance in a Multiple-Sport Population: an RCT Study
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2019 (English)In: Mindfulness, ISSN 1868-8527, E-ISSN 1868-8535, Vol. 10, no 8, p. 1518-1529Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives

The aim of the study was to examine mediating effects of emotion regulation and sport-specific dispositional mindfulness on self-rated athletic training performance, following the Mindfulness-Acceptance-Commitment (MAC) intervention, compared to a Psychological Skills Training (PST) control group.

Methods

Sixty-nine competitive elite athletes who did not have any prior experience with mindfulness- and acceptance-based exercises, were recruited and randomly assigned into either a MAC group or a traditional PST group. Latent growth curve analyses were performed to examine longitudinal relationships among the study variables. Mediation analyses were conducted to test if the growth trajectory of each of the proposed mediators mediated the relationship between the intervention and perceived performance (measured at T3).

Results

Findings showed that the MAC intervention had an indirect effect on self-rated athletic training performance through changes in dispositional mindfulness and emotion regulation respectively. Further, the MAC-group obtained greater post-test improvements in athletic mindfulness, emotion regulation abilities, and perceived performance compared to the PST group.

Conclusions

Overall, findings suggest that dispositional athletic mindfulness and emotion regulation may function as important mechanisms in MAC, and that the MAC approach is a more effective intervention compared to the PST condition in reducing emotion regulation difficulties, as well as enhancing sport-relevant mindfulness skills and perceived athletic training performance in elite sport.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York, NY: Springer, 2019
Keywords
Emotion regulation, MAC, Mediation analysis, Mindfulness, Mindfulness-acceptance-commitment, Performance, PST
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-39189 (URN)10.1007/s12671-019-01098-7 (DOI)000473450900006 ()
Funder
Swedish National Centre for Research in Sports, D2016-0037
Note

Funding: the Swedish Research Council for Sport Science (D2016-0037/P2016-0146) and from the Center of Research on Welfare, Health, and Sport, Halmstad University, Sweden

Available from: 2019-04-02 Created: 2019-04-02 Last updated: 2019-07-30Bibliographically approved
Nylandsted Jensen, S., Ivarsson, A., Fallby, J. & Elbe, A.-M. (2019). Gambling behaviours among Danish and Swedish elite football players. Journal of Clinical Sport Psychology, 13(1), 95-102
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gambling behaviours among Danish and Swedish elite football players
2019 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Sport Psychology, ISSN 1932-9261, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 95-102Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study investigated gambling among Danish and Swedish male elite football players. A cross-sectional design was used to survey 323 players (Mage = 22.08, SD = 5.15). The survey included a screening tool for gambling, as well as measures for depression and sport anxiety. The overall rate of players identified as at-risk gamblers was 16.1%. Linear regression analyses revealed that depression and sport anxiety significantly predicted gambling behaviours, and explained 2% and 6% of variance, respectively. The age of the players and the age at which they specialize did not moderate these relationships. Further research on gambling in football and its relation to mental disorders is needed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics, 2019
Keywords
depression, sport anxiety, mental health, elite sports, match fixing
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-36309 (URN)10.1123/jcsp.2017-0021 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-02-16 Created: 2018-02-16 Last updated: 2019-03-20Bibliographically approved
Parker, J., Ivarsson, A., Johnson, U., Svetoft, I., Andersen, M., Schough, C., . . . Warpman, S. (2019). Is self-determined motivation associated with the effects of an intervention aimed to increase physical activity and exercise levels? An 80-day follow-up. In: Abstract book for the ISBNPA 2019 Annual Meeting in Prague: . Paper presented at International Society of Behavior Nutrition and Physical Activity 2019 Annual Meeting, Prague, Czech Republic, 4-7 June, 2019 (pp. 488-488). International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Is self-determined motivation associated with the effects of an intervention aimed to increase physical activity and exercise levels? An 80-day follow-up
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2019 (English)In: Abstract book for the ISBNPA 2019 Annual Meeting in Prague, International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity , 2019, p. 488-488Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Objective: State-of-the-art technologies, for instance smart watches and smartphones, have the potential to positively influence physical activity and exercise in sedentary populations. Psychological factors, such as self-determined (SD) motivation, might influence the impact state-of-the-art technologies have on level of physical activity and exercise. The aim of this study was to investigate if self-determined motivation influences an intervention on both physical activity (PA) and exercise in a sedentary population.

Methods: 16 participants (men = 5, women = 11) with a self-reported low level of PA over the last year and predominantly sedentary jobs volunteered to participate in the study. PA data (steps and exercise time) were collected over an 80-day period using a wrist-worn accelerometer (Apple-watch and iPhone). Motivation was measured with the Behavioral Regulation in Exercise Questionnaire-2. At the start of the study, each participant completed the questionnaire and received their Apple-watches. Data analysis: All PA and exercise data were recorded through the Apple-watch and via Health App. Data for PA (steps) and exercise time were then extracted and aggregated to daily totals. Statistical analysis: Group means and standard deviations were calculated. A linear regression analysis was used to analyze the relationship between exercise time, PA, and SD, the R2 value effect size (ES) was used to estimate the magnitude of the differences. All data analyses were performed in MatLab (software, R2016b).

Results/findings: SD motivation (3.9±0.9) had a medium (R2 = 0.09) but not statistically significant (p = .26) effect on the amount of moderate to high-intensity exercise time (33.3±39.6 minutes) during the 80-day period. There was no statistically significant effect (R2 = 0.003, p = .84) of SD on PA (12953±7717 steps).

Conclusions: Given the small sample size, achieving a medium effect size has meaningful significance despite not achieving statistical significance. This result suggests that self-determined motivation effects the amount of daily exercise but not PA in a sedentary population. Combining technology and other strategies (e.g., motivational interviewing, coaching) to promote behavior change is promising, and these interventions should include theoretically derived behavior change techniques and take level of SD motivation into account.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 2019
Keywords
Self-determined motivation, Physical activity
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-39689 (URN)978-1-7324011-1-2 (ISBN)
Conference
International Society of Behavior Nutrition and Physical Activity 2019 Annual Meeting, Prague, Czech Republic, 4-7 June, 2019
Funder
Knowledge Foundation
Available from: 2019-06-11 Created: 2019-06-11 Last updated: 2019-08-02Bibliographically approved
Kristiansen, E., Ivarsson, A., Solstad, B. & Roberts, G. (2019). Motivational processes affecting the perception of organizational and media stressors among professional football players: A longitudinal mixed methods research study. Psychology of Sport And Exercise, 43, 172-182
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Motivational processes affecting the perception of organizational and media stressors among professional football players: A longitudinal mixed methods research study
2019 (English)In: Psychology of Sport And Exercise, ISSN 1469-0292, E-ISSN 1878-5476, Vol. 43, p. 172-182Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: The purpose of this study was to examine professional football players’ perceptions of organizational and media stressors over a season using Achievement Goal Theory (AGT) as the overarching motivational framework. We elaborated upon the experience of the extant motivational climate and how playersperceived and coped with a number of organizational and media stressors during the season.

Design: A mixed-methods approach was used in this longitudinal investigation with the quantitative testing of hypotheses (strand 1) complemented with interviews (strand II) exploring the perceptions of players of the target variables within their role in the team (captains, starters, and marginal players).

Method: 27 players from one men's team in a Scandinavian Premier Division completed a series of questionnaires at ten occasions during the season. We used the Bayesian dynamic p-technique analysis to investigate the relationships between AGT constructs and stressors. At the end of the season, 11 players were interviewed. The qualitative data were coded and narratives were used when presenting the findings.

Results: The quantitative results showed that a perceived mastery climate created by the coach was associated with low perceived magnitude of organizational stressors. The qualitative results revealed the main categories of organizational stressors were the selected line-up for games, injuries, and losing games. The results for media stressorsrevealed that task orientation was associated with low perceived magnitude of media stressors the following month, while ego orientation had the opposite relationship. The qualitative findings revealed that injured and marginal players were more sensitive to media questioning in a season where the team was acknowledged for their team performance.

Conclusions: There are benefits of being task-involved through task orientation and perception of a mastery climate to combat the quantity, frequency, and/or intensity of the perception of organizational and media stressors in professional football. © 2019 Elsevier Ltd.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Coach-athlete relationship, Goal orientations, Longitudinal investigation, Media stressors, Motivational climate, Organizational stressors, Person-centred analysis
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-39042 (URN)10.1016/j.psychsport.2019.02.009 (DOI)2-s2.0-85062402847 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-03-12 Created: 2019-03-12 Last updated: 2019-03-15Bibliographically approved
Josefsson, T., Tornberg, R., Gustafsson, H. & Ivarsson, A. (2019). Practitioners’ reflections of working with the Mindfulness-Acceptance-Commitment (MAC) approach in team sport settings. Journal of Sport Psychology in Action
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Practitioners’ reflections of working with the Mindfulness-Acceptance-Commitment (MAC) approach in team sport settings
2019 (English)In: Journal of Sport Psychology in Action, ISSN 2152-0704, E-ISSN 2152-0712Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

The aim of this article was to describe the implementation of a team-based MAC intervention, and discuss important aspects to consider when implementing the MAC protocol in elite team sports. The MAC program contains seven modules in which core concepts such as mindfulness, acceptance, and values-driven behavior are being taught and practiced. We experienced conceptual as well as practical challenges in the application of the MAC protocol. A general recommendation in implementing MAC concepts and exercises for teams is to make the content of the program sport-specific.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Philadelphia, PA: Routledge, 2019
Keywords
Acceptance, commitment, intervention, MAC, mindfulness
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-38808 (URN)10.1080/21520704.2018.1549641 (DOI)
Funder
Swedish National Centre for Research in Sports, D2016-0037/P2016-0146
Available from: 2019-01-30 Created: 2019-01-30 Last updated: 2019-01-30
Ivarsson, A. & Stenling, A. (2019). Prediction of injury risk in sports. In: N. Balakrishnan, Theodore Colton, Brian Everitt, Walter Piegorsch, Fabrizio Ruggeri & Jozef L. Teugels (Ed.), Wiley StatsRef: Statistics Reference Online. John Wiley & Sons
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prediction of injury risk in sports
2019 (English)In: Wiley StatsRef: Statistics Reference Online / [ed] N. Balakrishnan, Theodore Colton, Brian Everitt, Walter Piegorsch, Fabrizio Ruggeri & Jozef L. Teugels, John Wiley & Sons, 2019Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Sport injuries are a major problem associated with sport participation. To develop preventive strategies and programs, it is important to identify factors that will increase the likelihood of sport injuries. In most sport injury risk factor research, statistical analyses are performed; however, many of the most common statistical analyses provide limited information about predictors of sport injury risk. The common analyses used in previous studies do not acknowledge the complexity associated with investigating risk factors for sport injuries. To better capture this complexity, suggested in most theoretical frameworks, more appropriate of statistical approaches should be used. In this article we present how latent profile analysis, latent change score analysis, and latent growth curve analysis can be used to overcome some of the limitations with more traditional analyses. Lastly, we also elaborate on future directions for analyses in sport injury risk factor research. More specifically, we present how advanced statistical models, such as classification and regression trees (CART) analysis and random forest analysis, can be used to provide researchers and clinicians with results that are more clinically meaningful.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
National Category
Probability Theory and Statistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-38528 (URN)10.1002/9781118445112.stat08141 (DOI)9781118445112 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-12-09 Created: 2018-12-09 Last updated: 2019-05-16Bibliographically approved
Nylandsted Jensen, S., Ivarsson, A., Fallby, J., Dankers, S. & Elbe, A.-M. (2018). Depression in Danish and Swedish elite football players and its relation to perfectionism and anxiety. Psychology of Sport And Exercise, 36, 147-155
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Depression in Danish and Swedish elite football players and its relation to perfectionism and anxiety
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2018 (English)In: Psychology of Sport And Exercise, ISSN 1469-0292, E-ISSN 1878-5476, Vol. 36, p. 147-155Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the relation of perfectionism and anxiety to depressive symptoms in Danish and Swedish male elite football players. Additionally, the relationship between age and the study variables, and differences between elite junior and professional players were examined. Design and Methods. A cross-sectional design was used to survey 323 A-squad and U19 players (M age = 22.08 years, SD = 5.15). The survey included biographical information as well as measures of depressive symptoms, perfectionism (strivings and concerns), competitive anxiety, and social phobia. Results. Results revealed an overall prevalence rate for depressive symptoms among the participants of 16.7%. Moreover, correlation analyses showed evidence of the relationships between depression and perfectionistic concerns, competitive anxiety and social phobia. The results of a mediation analysis demonstrated that there was a positive indirect effect of perfectionistic concerns on depression via competitive anxiety. Significant negative correlations between age and anxiety, social phobia, and perfectionistic concerns were found. Depression, however, was not significantly correlated with age even though elite junior players’ depression levels were significantly higher than those of professional players and they showed higher levels in competitive anxiety and social phobia. Conclusions. Findings of the study indicate that more awareness of mental health in elite football is needed, and that the investigated psychological factors may be a starting point for establishing preventive programs and supportive interventions for footballers suffering from depressive symptoms. © 2018 Elsevier Ltd

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Elite athletes, Depressive symptoms, Perfectionistic strivings, Perfectionistic concerns, Social phobia, Competitive anxiety
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-36389 (URN)10.1016/j.psychsport.2018.02.008 (DOI)2-s2.0-85042729902 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-03-06 Created: 2018-03-06 Last updated: 2018-03-23Bibliographically approved
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