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Ivarsson, Andreas
Publications (10 of 107) Show all publications
Ingrell, J., Johnson, U. & Ivarsson, A. (2020). Achivement goals in youth sport and the infleunce of coach, peers and parents: A longitudinal study. Journal of Human Sport and Exercise, 15(3)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Achivement goals in youth sport and the infleunce of coach, peers and parents: A longitudinal study
2020 (English)In: Journal of Human Sport and Exercise, ISSN 1988-5202, E-ISSN 1988-5202, Vol. 15, no 3Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

The first purpose of this study was to longitudinally examine achievement goals in youth sport. The second purpose was to examine the within-person effects of perceived motivational climates by coaches, peers, and parents on achievement goal orientation. Participants were 78 young student-athletes, representing a variety of sports. The student-athletes completed a multi-section questionnaire, six times over a three-year period, assessing the study variables. Multilevel modelling analysis revealed that both task orientation and ego orientation decreased for this age group over the three-year period. Furthermore, perceived task-involving peer climate was significantly and positively related to task orientation, and perceived ego-involving coach climate was significantly and positively related to ego orientation. The results from this study provides insights regarding developmental changes in achievement goals and the importance of certain social agents in that specific developmental stage.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Alicante: , 2020
Keywords
Achievement goals, Coaches, Longitudinal, Parents, Peers
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-41092 (URN)10.14198/jhse.2020.153.09 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-12-03 Created: 2019-12-03 Last updated: 2019-12-03
Li, C., Ivarsson, A., Lam, L. & Sun, J. (2019). Basic Psychological Needs Satisfaction and Frustration, Stress, and Sports Injury among University Athletes: A Four-Wave Prospective Survey. Frontiers in Psychology, 10, Article ID 665.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Basic Psychological Needs Satisfaction and Frustration, Stress, and Sports Injury among University Athletes: A Four-Wave Prospective Survey
2019 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 10, article id 665Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The prevalence of sports injury among athletes is rather high, suggesting the need to better understand the causes of sports injury, including the risk factors, for preventive purposes. Grounded in Basic Psychological Needs Theory (BPNT) and the Model of Stress and Athletic Injury, the aim of this four-wave prospective survey study was to investigate the relationships among basic psychological needs satisfaction and frustration, stress responses, and sports injury. Study variables, including basic psychological need satisfaction/frustration, and perceived stress, were measured using a survey from 112 university athletes at the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd months of the study. Sports injury was assessed using a self-report form at the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th months of study. Results of the Bayesian multilevel analysis showed that basic psychological need satisfaction negatively predicted sports injuries, whereas stress was a positive predictor. In addition, basic psychological need satisfaction had an indirect effect on injury occurrence via stress. However, basic psychological need frustration did not predict sports injury. BPNT is a viable model to provide additional explanations to psychological risk factors of injury. Intervention programs may be formulated based on the evidence obtained on the model. © 2019 Li, Ivarsson, Lam and Sun.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lausanne: Frontiers Media S.A., 2019
Keywords
Athlete, injury, self-determination theory, longitudinal design, stress
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-39043 (URN)10.3389/fpsyg.2019.00665 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-03-12 Created: 2019-03-12 Last updated: 2019-03-27Bibliographically approved
Lundkvist, E., Gustafsson, H., Gerber, M., Lundqvist, C., Ivarsson, A. & Madigan, D. J. (2019). Commentary: Early Risk Detection of Burnout: Development of the Burnout Prevention Questionnaire for Coaches. Frontiers in Psychology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Commentary: Early Risk Detection of Burnout: Development of the Burnout Prevention Questionnaire for Coaches
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2019 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078Article in journal (Refereed) In press
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lausanne: Frontiers Media S.A., 2019
Keywords
burnout, Fatigue, Exhaustion disorder, Burnout measurement, Clinical burnout
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-41008 (URN)10.3389/fpsyg.2019.02721 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-11-21 Created: 2019-11-21 Last updated: 2019-11-27Bibliographically approved
Johnson, U., Parker, J., Ivarsson, A., Andersen, M. & Svetoft, I. (2019). Connection in the Fresh Air: A Study on the Benefits of Participation in an Electronic Tracking Outdoor Gym Exercise Programme. Montenegrin Journal of Sports Science and Medicine, 8(1), 61-67
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Connection in the Fresh Air: A Study on the Benefits of Participation in an Electronic Tracking Outdoor Gym Exercise Programme
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2019 (English)In: Montenegrin Journal of Sports Science and Medicine, ISSN 1800-8755, E-ISSN 1800-8763, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 61-67Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study aimed to explore whether a six-week intervention, based on participation in outdoor exercise, including activity-tracking devices and combined with individual consulting sessions, can both increase physical activity and yield positive changes in physiological and psychological health measures. A total of six participants, with a mean age of 41.2 (range 33-50 years), completed the ten-week study and the six-week intervention. The full study consisted of a four-week control/baseline and a six-week intervention period in which each participant acted as their own controls. Continuous measures of physical activity data were collected using a wrist-worn activity sensor during the ten-week study, along with pre- and post-measures of cardiovascular fitness, upper-body strength, BMI, general health, and motivation to exercise. The intervention consisted of a resistance-training programme for an outdoor gym and three motivational interviewing sessions. Eff ect sizes (percentage) for changes pre- to post-training were calculated. The results, because of the small sample size, are presented as individual cases, but the group, as a whole, showed average increases from baseline (pre-) to post-measures in strength (maximum row; 15.33%), time to exhaustion (3.58%), number of steps per day (4%), and autonomous motivation (12%) and average decreases in body weight (-1.08%), fat percentage (-7.58%), strength (chest; -2.5%), and stress symptoms (-2.17%). Th e six-week intervention programme showed promising results regarding physical activity changes. This study contributes to the limited evidence of the impact of resistance training programmes using outdoor gyms, electronic tracker, and motivational interviewing on physical activity outcomes. © 2019 by the authors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Podgorica: Montenegrin Sports Academy, 2019
Keywords
physical activity, physiological health, psychological well-being, computerized exercise inter-vention, motivational interviewing
National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-40504 (URN)10.26773/mjssm.190309 (DOI)000458745000009 ()2-s2.0-85063783510 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Intelligient Outdoor Exercise (IOE)
Funder
Knowledge Foundation, 240006
Available from: 2019-09-05 Created: 2019-09-05 Last updated: 2019-11-12
Chan, D., Stenling, A., Yusainy, C., Hikmiah, Z., Ivarsson, A., Hagger, M., . . . Beauchamp, M. (2019). Consistency tendency and the theory of planned behavior: A randomized controlled crossover trial in physical activity. Psychology and Health
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Consistency tendency and the theory of planned behavior: A randomized controlled crossover trial in physical activity
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2019 (English)In: Psychology and Health, ISSN 0887-0446, E-ISSN 1476-8321Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: This study examined the effects of consistency tendency on the predictive power of the theory of planned behavior (TPB) in relation to physical activity behavior.

Methods: In this randomized controlled cross-over trial, we recruited 770 undergraduate students from Indonesia who were randomly assigned into two groups. Participants completed physical activity versions of TPB measures at T1 (baseline) and T2 (post 1 week), and the International Physical Activity Questionnaire at T3 (post 1 month). At T1 and T2, the TPB questions were either presented in ensemble-order (i.e., consistency tendency supressed) or alternate-order (i.e., consistency tendency facilitated).

Results: The parameter estimates of the model (CFI > .92, TLI > .90, SRMR < .08, RMSEA < .08) aligned with the tenets of TPB. As compared to ensemble-order, a TPB measured in alternate-order yielded stronger cross-sectional relationships, but this pattern did not appear in the prospective relationships in TPB (i.e., intention/perceived behavioral control and behavior).

Conclusions: Consistency tendency inflated the factor correlations of cross-sectionally measured TPB variables, but the inflation was not observed in the prospective prediction of behavior. Health psychology questionnaires with items presented in ensemble order may represent a viable means of reducing the confounding effect of consistency tendency. © 2019 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Abingdon: Routledge, 2019
Keywords
Consistency motif, proximity effect, Socratic effect, common method variance, response bias, general response tendency
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-40953 (URN)10.1080/08870446.2019.1677904 (DOI)000491649400001 ()31642350 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85074457570 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funders: University of Hong Kong (104004966.092935.22400.301.01) & World Class University Funding Program for International Research Publication of Brawijaya University, Indonesia

Available from: 2019-11-14 Created: 2019-11-14 Last updated: 2019-11-15
Ziegert, K., Karlsson, S., Kristén, L. & Ivarsson, A. (2019). Dancing Together for Social Sustainability from a Life Course Perspective - Integrating Children and Senior Citizens in Action Research Project. In: : . Paper presented at IAGG-ER 2019, International Association of Gerontology, Gothenburg, Sweden, 23rd - 25th May, 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dancing Together for Social Sustainability from a Life Course Perspective - Integrating Children and Senior Citizens in Action Research Project
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This project has its starting-point in dance project with children and senior citizens. Children and senior citizen have their own health challenges. The Swedish culture does not encourage intergenerational activities in organizations and communities. Intergenerational contacts are in many terms referred to within families, except certain environments such as the educational institutions. Especially, the intergenerational contacts between children and senior citizens are neglected as an important factor in promoting knowledge and health in society. It does not need to be questioned, that both knowledge and health contributes to the sustainability in society. If individuals from different generations have the opportunity to exercise physical activities together, it is likely that it generates positive values for social sustainability. Social constructivism combined with a life course perspective is the fundamental theoretical standpoint for this project.  We will explain the complex matter of how theses processes of “constructed realities” are accomplish before approaching the central ideas of social constructivism in relation to our project.

The overall aim was to understand the knowledge of the social value of intergenerational physical activities, and how different age groups communicate their experiences in a life course perspective. There were many things we could learn in a life course perspective through activities among children and senior citizens, and how we could make use of this knowledge for implementations for social sustainability in general. This study included a three-stage process qualitative data from 48 stakeholders describing in individuals diaries about daily exercise, collected during one and a half year, with focus groups interviews with 24 children and 24 senior citizens. The third stage dancing activities was conducted, and follow up interviews with both participants. The thematic analysis was used emerge the results. We found a common joy for both children and senior citizens when performing the physical activities. Women believed physical activities improved their inclusion and social networks. The men found that the physical activities improved their wellbeing and health.

National Category
Other Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-39502 (URN)
Conference
IAGG-ER 2019, International Association of Gerontology, Gothenburg, Sweden, 23rd - 25th May, 2019
Available from: 2019-05-28 Created: 2019-05-28 Last updated: 2019-05-29Bibliographically approved
Burchard Erdvik, I., Haugen, T., Ivarsson, A. & Säfvenbom, R. (2019). Development of basic psychological need satisfaction in physical education: Effects of a two-year PE programme. Journal for Research in Arts and Sports Education, 3(2), 4-21
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Development of basic psychological need satisfaction in physical education: Effects of a two-year PE programme
2019 (English)In: Journal for Research in Arts and Sports Education, E-ISSN 2535-2857, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 4-21Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Research shows that sports-active students experience more basic need satisfaction (autonomy, competence, relatedness) in physical education (PE) than their non-sports-active peers, and thus, reap most of the benefits of PE. This study aimed to investigate the role of a two-year PE programme, referred to as Interest-based PE, in contributing to students’ basic need satisfaction in PE, and in particular, to assess potential basic needs-benefits among students who were not involved in leisure-time sport. Among 693 students, 348 were offered a choice of two different PE approaches (“explorative” vs. “sports” approach) for the next two years, while the remaining students continued to receive traditional PE. Girls, non-sports-active students, and students who experienced less need satisfaction in PE at baseline were more likely to choose the explorative approach, thereby signifying a wish for a less sports-centred PE. However, no significant differences in autonomy, competence, and relatedness need satisfaction were identified between Interest-based PE groups and their respective control groups over the course of the programme. Sports active students experienced more gains in relatedness need satisfaction than non-sports active students over the course of the programme, suggesting that challenges in promoting equal opportunities for learning in PE may require more than “Interest-based PE”.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oslo: Cappelen Damm Akademisk, 2019
Keywords
Basic needs, self-determination theory, adolescents, organized sport
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-40952 (URN)10.23865/jased.v3.1375 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-11-14 Created: 2019-11-14 Last updated: 2019-11-27Bibliographically approved
Ingrell, J., Johnson, U. & Ivarsson, A. (2019). Developmental changes in burnout perceptions among student-athletes: An achievement goal perspective. International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 17(5), 509-520
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Developmental changes in burnout perceptions among student-athletes: An achievement goal perspective
2019 (English)In: International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, ISSN 1612-197X, E-ISSN 1557-251X, Vol. 17, no 5, p. 509-520Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study examined (a) the developmental trajectories of student-athlete burnout perceptions and (b) the within-person relationship between achievement goals and burnout perceptions. A three-year and six-wave longitudinal study was conducted with 78 student-athletes (30 young women and 48 young men, Mage at T1 = 12.7 years, SD = 0.44), attending a sport compulsory school. The Athlete Burnout Questionnaire and the Task and Ego Orientation in Sport Questionnaire were used. The results from multilevel growth models revealed that burnout perceptions increased for this age group over the three-year period. Furthermore, task orientation was significantly and negatively related to a reduced sense of accomplishment and sport devaluation. The results from this study underline the advantage of considering developmental processes when studying burnout. Furthermore, by focusing on the within-person effect of achievement goals, this study provides findings that support a motivational approach to the longitudinally study of burnout propensity among young student-athletes. The current study suggests that sport school staff should be aware of their student-athletes’ burnout perceptions and that these could change over time. Results also highlights that task-oriented goals might help decrease burnout perceptions, specifically reduced sense of accomplishment and sport devaluation. © 2018 International Society of Sport Psychology

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York, NY: Taylor & Francis, 2019
Keywords
achievement goals, adolescents, burnout, school sport, student-athlete
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-36308 (URN)10.1080/1612197X.2017.1421679 (DOI)2-s2.0-85040984492 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-02-16 Created: 2018-02-16 Last updated: 2019-08-12Bibliographically approved
Josefsson, T., Ivarsson, A., Gustafsson, H., Stenling, A., Lindwall, M., Tornberg, R. & Böröy, J. (2019). Effects of Mindfulness-Acceptance-Commitment (MAC) on Sport-Specific Dispositional Mindfulness, Emotion Regulation, and Self-Rated Athletic Performance in a Multiple-Sport Population: an RCT Study. Mindfulness, 10(8), 1518-1529
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of Mindfulness-Acceptance-Commitment (MAC) on Sport-Specific Dispositional Mindfulness, Emotion Regulation, and Self-Rated Athletic Performance in a Multiple-Sport Population: an RCT Study
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2019 (English)In: Mindfulness, ISSN 1868-8527, E-ISSN 1868-8535, Vol. 10, no 8, p. 1518-1529Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives

The aim of the study was to examine mediating effects of emotion regulation and sport-specific dispositional mindfulness on self-rated athletic training performance, following the Mindfulness-Acceptance-Commitment (MAC) intervention, compared to a Psychological Skills Training (PST) control group.

Methods

Sixty-nine competitive elite athletes who did not have any prior experience with mindfulness- and acceptance-based exercises, were recruited and randomly assigned into either a MAC group or a traditional PST group. Latent growth curve analyses were performed to examine longitudinal relationships among the study variables. Mediation analyses were conducted to test if the growth trajectory of each of the proposed mediators mediated the relationship between the intervention and perceived performance (measured at T3).

Results

Findings showed that the MAC intervention had an indirect effect on self-rated athletic training performance through changes in dispositional mindfulness and emotion regulation respectively. Further, the MAC-group obtained greater post-test improvements in athletic mindfulness, emotion regulation abilities, and perceived performance compared to the PST group.

Conclusions

Overall, findings suggest that dispositional athletic mindfulness and emotion regulation may function as important mechanisms in MAC, and that the MAC approach is a more effective intervention compared to the PST condition in reducing emotion regulation difficulties, as well as enhancing sport-relevant mindfulness skills and perceived athletic training performance in elite sport.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York, NY: Springer, 2019
Keywords
Emotion regulation, MAC, Mediation analysis, Mindfulness, Mindfulness-acceptance-commitment, Performance, PST
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-39189 (URN)10.1007/s12671-019-01098-7 (DOI)000473450900006 ()
Funder
Swedish National Centre for Research in Sports, D2016-0037
Note

Funding: the Swedish Research Council for Sport Science (D2016-0037/P2016-0146) and from the Center of Research on Welfare, Health, and Sport, Halmstad University, Sweden

Available from: 2019-04-02 Created: 2019-04-02 Last updated: 2019-07-30Bibliographically approved
Nylandsted Jensen, S., Ivarsson, A., Fallby, J. & Elbe, A.-M. (2019). Gambling behaviours among Danish and Swedish elite football players. Journal of Clinical Sport Psychology, 13(1), 95-102
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gambling behaviours among Danish and Swedish elite football players
2019 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Sport Psychology, ISSN 1932-9261, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 95-102Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study investigated gambling among Danish and Swedish male elite football players. A cross-sectional design was used to survey 323 players (Mage = 22.08, SD = 5.15). The survey included a screening tool for gambling, as well as measures for depression and sport anxiety. The overall rate of players identified as at-risk gamblers was 16.1%. Linear regression analyses revealed that depression and sport anxiety significantly predicted gambling behaviours, and explained 2% and 6% of variance, respectively. The age of the players and the age at which they specialize did not moderate these relationships. Further research on gambling in football and its relation to mental disorders is needed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics, 2019
Keywords
depression, sport anxiety, mental health, elite sports, match fixing
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-36309 (URN)10.1123/jcsp.2017-0021 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-02-16 Created: 2018-02-16 Last updated: 2019-03-20Bibliographically approved
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