hh.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Publications (10 of 27) Show all publications
Johnson, U., Ivarsson, A., Parker, J., Svetoft, I. & Andersen, M. (2023). A study on the benefits of participation in an electronic tracking physical activity program and motivational interviewing during a three-month period. Movement & sport sciences (119), 1-8
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A study on the benefits of participation in an electronic tracking physical activity program and motivational interviewing during a three-month period
Show others...
2023 (English)In: Movement & sport sciences, ISSN 2118-5735, no 119, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The purpose was to investigate if participation in a three-month electronic tracking outdoor physical activity and a motivational interviewing (MI) intervention led to positive behavioural, psychological, and physiological outcomes. Methods: Based on a two-group pre-post design, 12 middle-aged women and 6 men were randomly assign to an experimental and a control group. Physical activity data were collected by wrist-worn activity sensors, and pre-post data were collected on the GHQ-12, the BREQ-2, body mass, body fat mass and total body muscle. Measures of cardiovascular fitness were taken pre to post. The experimental group was supported through individual MI coaching sessions and resistance-training for use in an outdoor gym. Magnitude based inferences (MBI) were calculated based on the disposition of the confidence limits for the mean differences to the smallest worthwhile changes. Results: The experimental group had a beneficial increase in its physical activity behaviour (steps). The control group had a medium decrease in identified regulation, the experimental group maintained the same level at the post-measure. Conclusion: Few studies have investigated how the combination of MI and the use of activity-tracking devices effect physical and mental health. This study investigates the use of both MI and activity-tracking devices on psychological well-being, motivation, and physical health in an outdoor context. Future research recommendations are given. © 2022 ACAPS

Abstract [fr]

Introduction: L'objectif était de déterminer si la participation à une intervention d'activité physique extérieure avec suivi électronique et d'entretiens motivationnels (MI) d'une durée de trois mois conduisait à des résultats positifs sur les plans comportementaux, psychologiques et physiologiques. Méthodes: Suivant un design d'étude pré-post à deux groupes, 12 femmes d'âge moyen et 6 hommes ont été assignés par randomisation à un groupe expérimental ou à un groupe contrôle. Les données relatives à l'activité physique ont été collectées au moyen de capteurs d'activité portés au poignet. Les données pré- et post-intervention concernaient le GHQ-12, le BREQ-2, la masse corporelle, la masse grasse et la masse musculaire. La condition cardiovasculaire a également été mesurée pré- et post-intervention. Le groupe expérimental a bénéficié de MI individuels et d'ateliers de renforcement musculaire en plein air. Des magnitude based inferences (MBI) ont été calculées à partir de la disposition des limites de confiance concernant les différences moyennes des plus petits changements significatifs. Résultats: Le groupe expérimental présentait une augmentation bénéfique du comportement d'activité physique (nombre de pas). Le groupe contrôle présentait une diminution moyenne de la régulation identifiée, tandis que cette valeur est restée stable dans le groupe expérimental. Conclusion: Peu d'études ont examiné comment la combinaison de MI et de dispositifs de suivi de l'activité affectent la santé physique et mentale. Cette étude a examiné l'influence de l'utilisation conjointe de MI et de dispositifs de suivi d'activité sur le bien-être psychologique, la motivation et la santé physique dans un contexte de pratique extérieure. Des recommandations relatives aux recherches futures ont été formulées. © 2022 ACAPS

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Les Ulis: EDP Sciences, 2023
Keywords
Computerized exercise intervention, computerized exercise intervention, Experimental design, Motivational interviewing, Physical activity, Physiological health, Psychological well-being, Activité physique, Bien-être psychologique, Santé physiologique, Design expérimental
National Category
Health Sciences Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-50226 (URN)10.1051/sm/2022023 (DOI)2-s2.0-85149781091 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Knowledge Foundation, 20160097
Note

Titel på franska: Une étude sur les avantages de la participation à un programme de suivi électronique de l’activité physique et d’entretiens motivationnels pendant une période de trois mois

Available from: 2023-03-29 Created: 2023-03-29 Last updated: 2023-03-29Bibliographically approved
Parker, J., Hellström, J. & Olsson, M. C. (2022). Differences in kinematics and driver performance in elite female and male golfers. Sports Biomechanics, 21(6), 731-747
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Differences in kinematics and driver performance in elite female and male golfers
2022 (English)In: Sports Biomechanics, ISSN 1476-3141, E-ISSN 1752-6116, Vol. 21, no 6, p. 731-747Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to compare swing kinematic differences between women and men and investigate which variables predict clubhead speed (CHS) and carry distance (CD) whilst accounting for individual variation. Methods: Swing kinematics and driver performance data were collected on 20 (10 women) elite golfers (HCP 0.7 ± 1.4). We used Bayesian T-test for between sex comparison of swing kinematics and Bayesian Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) to produce general linear models for CHS and carry distance for elite female and male golfers separately. Results: There was strong evidence that the driver performance variables CHS and CD were decreased in women compared to men, and two kinematic variables; time to arm peak speed downswing and angular wrist peak speed were slower in women. The ANCOVAs identified very strong to overwhelming evidence that participant as a fixed factor was a determinant of CHS for both women and men but was not a determinant of CD. Conclusion: when looking to enhance driver performance among high-level golfers, coaches should be aware that variables that determine CHS and CD differ among women and men and if the aim is to improve CHS coaches should not forget the importance of individual swing characteristics. © 2019 Parker, Hellström & Olsson. Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Abingdon: Routledge, 2022
Keywords
Bayesian inference, clubhead speed, carry distance, golf performance, sex differences
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-41081 (URN)10.1080/14763141.2019.1683221 (DOI)000496368700001 ()31724482 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85075147208 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Knowledge Foundation, 2012/0319
Available from: 2019-12-03 Created: 2019-12-03 Last updated: 2022-08-23Bibliographically approved
Parker, J., Johnson, U. & Ivarsson, A. (2021). Initial positive indications with wearable fitness technology followed by relapse: What’s going on?. Sustainability, 13(14), Article ID 7704.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Initial positive indications with wearable fitness technology followed by relapse: What’s going on?
2021 (English)In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 13, no 14, article id 7704Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

© 2021 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.The motivational influence of wearable fitness technology (WFT) on increasing physical activity (PA) is unclear, and improvements in PA have been shown to be driven by both intrinsic and extrinsic motivation. In the current study, PA (daily number of steps), moderate to vigorous intensity physical activity, and muscular strength training were measured over 6 months on, originally, 16 randomly selected sedentary community workers (mean age = 51 years). Moreover, self-determined motivation (Behavioral Regulation in Exercise Questionnaire-2) was measured before, midway, and after a 6-month intervention program that included motivational interviewing, as well as the use of WFT and a structured outdoor gym program. Our findings showed WFT, in combination with motivational interviewing, initially helped the participants meet recommended guidelines for PA in terms of at least 10,000 steps per day, and at least 150 min of moderate aerobic activity per week. There was a large decrease in participants’ PA and increase in introjected motivation between the first half (3 months) and the second half of the intervention (6 months). The increase in introjected motivation suggests that toward the end of the 6-month intervention, participants engaged in PA to satisfy external demands or avoid guilt, which may lead to less-persistent behavior change.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI AG, 2021
Keywords
Health, Motivation, Physical activity, Wearable fitness technology
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-45425 (URN)10.3390/su13147704 (DOI)000677106400001 ()2-s2.0-85111106846 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-08-24 Created: 2021-08-24 Last updated: 2022-07-06Bibliographically approved
Parker, J., Johnson, U. & Ivarsson, A. (2021). Is perceived autonomy support provided by a coach related to the intention of injury preventative behavior among national and international level golfers?. Frontiers in Sports and Active Living, 3, Article ID 569590.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Is perceived autonomy support provided by a coach related to the intention of injury preventative behavior among national and international level golfers?
2021 (English)In: Frontiers in Sports and Active Living, E-ISSN 2624-9367, Vol. 3, article id 569590Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The successful implementation of injury prevention programs is reliant on athletes and coaches accepting, adopting, and complying with behaviors that reduce injury risk. Exploring factors, such as motivation and planned behavior, that might increase the frequency of these behaviors warrants investigation. The aim of the study was to investigate the complex interaction between perceived autonomy support, self-determined motivation, planned behavior, and how this relates to golfers self-reported intention injury preventative behavior. A total of 60 golfers completed questions on psychological measures of perceived autonomy support from coaches, autonomous motivation, and intentions of injury preventative behavior. A neural network model analysis was performed to investigate the strength of connection between covariates and construct a network structure. Analysis of results was performed by assessing edge strengths and node centrality to guide inference of the network topology. The most central node was autonomous regulation and the results showed one cluster comprising positive interactions between perceived autonomy support, effort of injury preventative behavior, and frequency of injury preventative behavior. When aiming to encourage injury preventative behavior, coaches should consider giving feedback that supports autonomous motivation since it is positively associated with effort and frequency of injury preventative behavior among high-level golfers. Injury prevention programs should include strategies to improve the athlete’s autonomous motivation to carry out preventive activities. Copyright © 2021 Parker, Johnson and Ivarsson.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lausanne: Frontiers Research Foundation, 2021
Keywords
autonomy support, coaching, golf, injury prevention, network analysis
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-44047 (URN)10.3389/fspor.2021.569590 (DOI)000706131500001 ()33791597 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85105998251 (Scopus ID)
Note

This work was supported by the Swedish Research Council for Sport Science under Grant P2018 0182.

Available from: 2021-03-18 Created: 2021-03-18 Last updated: 2023-06-08Bibliographically approved
Parker, J. & Lundgren, L. E. (2021). Pedal to the Metal: Velocity and Power in High Level Golfers. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 35(12), 3425-3431
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pedal to the Metal: Velocity and Power in High Level Golfers
2021 (English)In: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, ISSN 1064-8011, E-ISSN 1533-4287, Vol. 35, no 12, p. 3425-3431Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In most rotational power assessments, discrete variables are used for subsequent examination; however, movements are continuous, and data can be collected in time series. The purpose of this investigation was to examine the velocity- and power-time series characteristics of a standing rotation test and identify relationships with golf performance. Thirty-one golfers performed a golfspecific rotation test (GSRT) with 3 different resistances (6, 10, and 14 kg) in a robotic engine system. Time series of velocity and power was calculated from the raw data, and each repetition was then normalized to 0–100%. Principal component analyses (PCAs) were performed on velocity and power waveforms. The PCA used an eigenvalue analysis of the data covariance matrix. The relationship between clubhead speed (CHS) and all principal components (PC) was examined using linear regression. Ten velocity parameters and 6 power parameters explained 80% of the variance in the data. For velocity, the first 2 PCs identified both magnitude and phase shift features while PCs 3–5 identified difference features. For power, the first 2 PCs identified both magnitude and phase shift features, the third PC identified a phase shift feature, and the fourth PC identified a difference feature. The highest relationship with CHS was shown for GSRT with 14 kg in PC2 for power (R2 5 0.48, p , 0.001). The PCA of the GSRT power test could distinguish intraindividual differences, external loads, and sex-based differences. Athletes should focus on accelerating smoothly through the movement, particularly with heavier loads, and not pulling aggressively at the beginning of the rotational AU3 movement to achieve maximum power. Copyright © 2019 by the National Strength & Conditioning Association.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2021
Keywords
principal component analysis, time series, golf, athlete assessment
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-41088 (URN)10.1519/JSC.0000000000003357 (DOI)000752537900023 ()31490426 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85124433019 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Knowledge Foundation, 2012/0319
Available from: 2019-12-03 Created: 2019-12-03 Last updated: 2022-03-08Bibliographically approved
Hertting, K., Holmquist, M. & Parker, J. (2020). Ping pong for health: the meaning of space in a sport based health intervention at the workplace. International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, 15(sup1), Article ID 1689602.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ping pong for health: the meaning of space in a sport based health intervention at the workplace
2020 (English)In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 15, no sup1, article id 1689602Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: This is a study on a sport-based intervention, with a focus on physical activity, social relations, and learning, to promote health and well-being in the workplace lived space. Lived space is situated and associated with social and cultural conventions which affect the quality of the perceived space at work. The aim of the paper is to elucidate the participant’s experiences of the intervention and how health and well-being were affected.

Methods: The intervention was conducted with employees from the warehouse of a company within the retail sector. The design consisted of one initial workshop as a baseline, a sport-based intervention, three group interviews, and a final workshop. A hermeneutic phenomenological analysis focused on experiences of the intervention and the meaning of the workplace as the lived space.

Results: Three themes emerged in the analysis; Expressing positive individual effects, Expressing improved work environment and The meaning of the workplace as lived space. The themes are discussed in relation to three basic health foci: physical activity, social relations and learning.

Conclusion: The workplace as a lived space offers a valuable opportunity for sport-based interventions that improve health and well-being through physical activity, social relations, and learning.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Abingdon: Taylor & Francis, 2020
Keywords
Health promotion, sport-based intervention, well-being, workplace, phenomenology, lived space, physical activity, learning, social relations, health culture
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-43367 (URN)10.1080/17482631.2019.1689602 (DOI)000588361500003 ()2-s2.0-85094647526 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-11-02 Created: 2020-11-02 Last updated: 2021-10-25Bibliographically approved
Parker, J., Ivarsson, A., Johnson, U., Svetoft, I., Andersen, M., Schough, C., . . . Warpman, S. (2019). Is self-determined motivation associated with the effects of an intervention aimed to increase physical activity and exercise levels? An 80-day follow-up. In: Abstract book for the ISBNPA 2019 Annual Meeting in Prague: . Paper presented at Conference: International Society of Behavior Nutrition and Physical Activity 2019 Annual Meeting, Prague, Czech Republic, June 4-7, 2019 (pp. 488-488). London, UK: BioMed Central
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Is self-determined motivation associated with the effects of an intervention aimed to increase physical activity and exercise levels? An 80-day follow-up
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Abstract book for the ISBNPA 2019 Annual Meeting in Prague, London, UK: BioMed Central, 2019, p. 488-488Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Objective: State-of-the-art technologies, for instance smart watches and smartphones, have the potential to positively influence physical activity and exercise in sedentary populations. Psychological factors, such as self-determined (SD) motivation, might influence the impact state-of-the-art technologies have on level of physical activity and exercise. The aim of this study was to investigate if self-determined motivation influences an intervention on both physical activity (PA) and exercise in a sedentary population.

Methods: 16 participants (men = 5, women = 11) with a self-reported low level of PA over the last year and predominantly sedentary jobs volunteered to participate in the study. PA data (steps and exercise time) were collected over an 80-day period using a wrist-worn accelerometer (Apple-watch and iPhone). Motivation was measured with the Behavioral Regulation in Exercise Questionnaire-2. At the start of the study, each participant completed the questionnaire and received their Apple-watches. Data analysis: All PA and exercise data were recorded through the Apple-watch and via Health App. Data for PA (steps) and exercise time were then extracted and aggregated to daily totals. Statistical analysis: Group means and standard deviations were calculated. A linear regression analysis was used to analyze the relationship between exercise time, PA, and SD, the R2 value effect size (ES) was used to estimate the magnitude of the differences. All data analyses were performed in MatLab (software, R2016b).

Results/findings: SD motivation (3.9±0.9) had a medium (R2 = 0.09) but not statistically significant (p = .26) effect on the amount of moderate to high-intensity exercise time (33.3±39.6 minutes) during the 80-day period. There was no statistically significant effect (R2 = 0.003, p = .84) of SD on PA (12953±7717 steps).

Conclusions: Given the small sample size, achieving a medium effect size has meaningful significance despite not achieving statistical significance. This result suggests that self-determined motivation effects the amount of daily exercise but not PA in a sedentary population. Combining technology and other strategies (e.g., motivational interviewing, coaching) to promote behavior change is promising, and these interventions should include theoretically derived behaviour change techniques and take level of SD motivation into account.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London, UK: BioMed Central, 2019
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-41082 (URN)978-1-7324011-1-2 (ISBN)
Conference
Conference: International Society of Behavior Nutrition and Physical Activity 2019 Annual Meeting, Prague, Czech Republic, June 4-7, 2019
Available from: 2019-12-03 Created: 2019-12-03 Last updated: 2021-02-02Bibliographically approved
Parker, J., Ivarsson, A., Johnson, U., Svetoft, I., Andersen, M., Schough, C., . . . Warpman, S. (2019). Is self-determined motivation associated with the effects of an intervention aimed to increase physical activity and exercise levels? An 80-day follow-up. In: Abstract book for the ISBNPA 2019 Annual Meeting in Prague: . Paper presented at International Society of Behavior Nutrition and Physical Activity 2019 Annual Meeting, Prague, Czech Republic, 4-7 June, 2019 (pp. 488-488). International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Is self-determined motivation associated with the effects of an intervention aimed to increase physical activity and exercise levels? An 80-day follow-up
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Abstract book for the ISBNPA 2019 Annual Meeting in Prague, International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity , 2019, p. 488-488Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Objective: State-of-the-art technologies, for instance smart watches and smartphones, have the potential to positively influence physical activity and exercise in sedentary populations. Psychological factors, such as self-determined (SD) motivation, might influence the impact state-of-the-art technologies have on level of physical activity and exercise. The aim of this study was to investigate if self-determined motivation influences an intervention on both physical activity (PA) and exercise in a sedentary population.

Methods: 16 participants (men = 5, women = 11) with a self-reported low level of PA over the last year and predominantly sedentary jobs volunteered to participate in the study. PA data (steps and exercise time) were collected over an 80-day period using a wrist-worn accelerometer (Apple-watch and iPhone). Motivation was measured with the Behavioral Regulation in Exercise Questionnaire-2. At the start of the study, each participant completed the questionnaire and received their Apple-watches. Data analysis: All PA and exercise data were recorded through the Apple-watch and via Health App. Data for PA (steps) and exercise time were then extracted and aggregated to daily totals. Statistical analysis: Group means and standard deviations were calculated. A linear regression analysis was used to analyze the relationship between exercise time, PA, and SD, the R2 value effect size (ES) was used to estimate the magnitude of the differences. All data analyses were performed in MatLab (software, R2016b).

Results/findings: SD motivation (3.9±0.9) had a medium (R2 = 0.09) but not statistically significant (p = .26) effect on the amount of moderate to high-intensity exercise time (33.3±39.6 minutes) during the 80-day period. There was no statistically significant effect (R2 = 0.003, p = .84) of SD on PA (12953±7717 steps).

Conclusions: Given the small sample size, achieving a medium effect size has meaningful significance despite not achieving statistical significance. This result suggests that self-determined motivation effects the amount of daily exercise but not PA in a sedentary population. Combining technology and other strategies (e.g., motivational interviewing, coaching) to promote behavior change is promising, and these interventions should include theoretically derived behavior change techniques and take level of SD motivation into account.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 2019
Keywords
Self-determined motivation, Physical activity
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-39689 (URN)978-1-7324011-1-2 (ISBN)
Conference
International Society of Behavior Nutrition and Physical Activity 2019 Annual Meeting, Prague, Czech Republic, 4-7 June, 2019
Funder
Knowledge Foundation
Available from: 2019-06-11 Created: 2019-06-11 Last updated: 2022-06-07Bibliographically approved
Johnson, U., Parker, J. & Ivarsson, A. (2019). Perceived challenges during participation in a six month outdoor gym exercise programme: participants reflections. In: B. Strauss et al. (Ed.), Abstract book: The 15th European Congress of Sport and Exercise Psychology – Building the Future of Sport and Exercise Psychology. Paper presented at The 15th European Congress of Sport and Exercise Psychology, Münster, Germany, July 15-20, 2019 (pp. 62-62).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Perceived challenges during participation in a six month outdoor gym exercise programme: participants reflections
2019 (English)In: Abstract book: The 15th European Congress of Sport and Exercise Psychology – Building the Future of Sport and Exercise Psychology / [ed] B. Strauss et al., 2019, p. 62-62Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Background and objective: Research has demonstrated positive associations between park-based outdoor gyms and physical activity (Rung et al., 2011). Few studies have evaluated potential challenges with outdoor gyms on physical activity, especially interventions using smartphone Apps (Johnson et al., 2019). The purpose was to study the participant’s perceived challenges during participation in a six-month outdoor gym program.

Methods: Ten participants (age = 50.3, SD = 9.2), with low levels of physical activity were interviewed at the end of the six-month intervention (male = 2; female =8). At the start of the intervention participants received a smartwatch and the “ParkStark” exercise app, along with an individual motivational interviewing coaching sessions.

Results/findings: A thematic content analysis of the interview data generated three core themes of perceived challenges experienced during the intervention: negative life event stressors, problems managing the smartwatch and an exercise app, and, lack of motivation. The results indicated both structural and personal challenges, likely to have a negative effect on the adherence to the intervention protocol.

Conclusions: It is important to develop simple and user-friendly communication systems. When designing outdoor gyms, it is recommended to organize opportunity for continuous communication with significant others to facilitate motivation and adherence for sustainable exercise.

National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-41083 (URN)
Conference
The 15th European Congress of Sport and Exercise Psychology, Münster, Germany, July 15-20, 2019
Available from: 2019-12-03 Created: 2019-12-03 Last updated: 2020-04-07Bibliographically approved
Parker, J. (2018). A multi-disciplinary approach to studying performance among high-level golfers: physiological and biomechanical aspects. (Licentiate dissertation). Halmstad: Halmstad University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A multi-disciplinary approach to studying performance among high-level golfers: physiological and biomechanical aspects
2018 (English)Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

In competitive golf, the player’s ability to hit the ball a long distance affects the score in a positive way. Swing kinematics is considered an important factor in driver performance; one way of improving swing kinematics is through strength and power training. Subsequently, high-level golfers and their coaches often explore novel ways of increasing the distance of a shot, in particular driver carry distance (CD). This licentiate thesis presents two studies with the overall aim of studying how swing kinematic and physical characteristics are associated with driver performance among intercollegiate golf players. The studies report swing kinematics associated with driver performance (study 1) and the impact of isokinetic rotational training on driver performance and swing kinematic variables (study 2).

The methods used were (1) a cross-sectional correlation study (n=15) and (2) an open trial intervention study (n=20). The studies investigated (1) the relationship between golf swing kinematics and driver performance, and (2) the impact of strength training on swing kinematics and driver performance variable.

The results show variables that were distinctive for the club head speed (CHS) were mainly during the downswing: greater X-factor stretch; and higher pelvis peak speed. Whilst, factors distinctive to the regression model for CD were mainly at impact: reduced thorax rotation; and greater thorax lateral bend. Nine weeks of isokinetic training increased seated rotational force and power, peak arm speed and arm acceleration, ball speed, and CD more compared to isotonic training. Even though isokinetic training did not increase CHS, it did result in greater CD.

This licentiate thesis contributes to the understanding of which variables influence driver performance, in particular CD, among high-level golfers. Segmental interactions (pelvis-thorax), lead arm speed and acceleration, isokinetic and isotonic training. These results may guide training interventions aiming to improve driver and golf performance among high-level golfers, particularly those with a background of strength training. Future studies could investigate how the interaction between swing kinematics, clubhead trajectory, and driver performance variables differ between male and female golfers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Halmstad: Halmstad University Press, 2018. p. 73
Series
Halmstad University Dissertations ; 49
Keywords
Carry distance, clubhead speed, driver performance, golf kinematics, sports performance, strength training, isokinetic training
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-37792 (URN)978-91-88749-02-4 (ISBN)978-91-88749-03-1 (ISBN)
Presentation
2018-09-18, O125, Högskolan i Halmstad, Halmstad, 09:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Funder
Knowledge Foundation, 2012/0319
Available from: 2018-09-20 Created: 2018-08-27 Last updated: 2018-09-20Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-1184-5036

Search in DiVA

Show all publications