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BETA
Bartha, Ferenc ÁgostonORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-7545-9145
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Publications (3 of 3) Show all publications
Duracz, A., Bartha, F. Á. & Taha, W. (2016). Accurate Rigorous Simulation Should be Possible for Good Designs. In: Erika Ábrahám & Sergiy Bogomolov (Ed.), Proceedings of the 2016 International Workshop on Symbolic and Numerical Methods for Reachability Analysis (SNR): . Paper presented at 2nd International Workshop on Symbolic and Numerical Methods for Reachability Analysis (SNR’16), Vienna, Austria, April 11, 2016. Piscataway, NJ: IEEE conference proceedings, Article ID 7479376.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Accurate Rigorous Simulation Should be Possible for Good Designs
2016 (English)In: Proceedings of the 2016 International Workshop on Symbolic and Numerical Methods for Reachability Analysis (SNR) / [ed] Erika Ábrahám & Sergiy Bogomolov, Piscataway, NJ: IEEE conference proceedings, 2016, article id 7479376Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The development of Cyber-Physical Systems benefits from better methods and tools to support the simulation and verification of hybrid (continuous/discrete) models. Acumen is an open source testbed for exploring the design space of what rigorous-but-practical next-generation tools can deliver to developers. Central to Acumen is the notion of rigorous simulation. Like verification tools, rigorous simulation is intended to provide guarantees about the behavior of the system. Like traditional simulation tools, it is intended to be intuitive, practical, and scalable. Whether these two goals can be achieved simultaneously is an important, long-term challenge.

This paper proposes a design principle that can play an important role in meeting this challenge. The principle addresses the criticism that accumulating numerical errors is a serious impediment to practical rigorous simulation. It is inspired by a twofold insight: one relating to the nature of systems engineered in the real world, and the other relating to how numerical errors in the simulation of a model can be recast as errors in the state or parameters of the model in the simulation. We present a suite of small, concrete benchmarks that can be used to assess the extent to which a rigorous simulator upholds the proposed principle. We also report on which benchmarks Acumen's current rigorous simulator already succeeds and which ones remain challenging.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Piscataway, NJ: IEEE conference proceedings, 2016
Keywords
modeling, simulation, interval analysis, stability
National Category
Computational Mathematics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-30577 (URN)10.1109/SNR.2016.7479376 (DOI)000382758100001 ()2-s2.0-84978544274 (Scopus ID)978-1-5090-3079-8 (ISBN)
Conference
2nd International Workshop on Symbolic and Numerical Methods for Reachability Analysis (SNR’16), Vienna, Austria, April 11, 2016
Funder
Knowledge FoundationVINNOVA, 2011-01819
Note

Funding: US NSF award CPS-1136099, the Swedish Knowledge Foundation (KK), The CERES Center, and VINNOVA (Dnr. 2011-01819).

Available from: 2016-03-23 Created: 2016-03-23 Last updated: 2018-03-22Bibliographically approved
Konečný, M., Taha, W., Bartha, F. Á., Duracz, J., Duracz, A. & Ames, A. D. (2016). Enclosing the behavior of a hybrid automaton up to and beyond a Zeno point. Nonlinear Analysis: Hybrid Systems, 20, 1-20
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Enclosing the behavior of a hybrid automaton up to and beyond a Zeno point
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2016 (English)In: Nonlinear Analysis: Hybrid Systems, ISSN 1751-570X, E-ISSN 1878-7460, Vol. 20, p. 1-20Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Even simple hybrid automata like the classic bouncing ball can exhibit Zeno behavior. The existence of this type of behavior has so far forced a large class of simulators to either ignore some events or risk looping indefinitely. This in turn forces modelers to either insert ad-hoc restrictions to circumvent Zeno behavior or to abandon hybrid automata. To address this problem, we take a fresh look at event detection and localization. A key insight that emerges from this investigation is that an enclosure for a given time interval can be valid independent of the occurrence of a given event. Such an event can then even occur an unbounded number of times. This insight makes it possible to handle some types of Zeno behavior. If the post-Zeno state is defined explicitly in the given model of the hybrid automaton, the computed enclosure covers the corresponding trajectory that starts from the Zeno point through a restarted evolution. ©2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Elsevier, 2016
Keywords
hybrid automata, hybrid systems, validated numerics, simulation, model validation, reliability
National Category
Computational Mathematics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-29869 (URN)10.1016/j.nahs.2015.10.004 (DOI)000370898700001 ()2-s2.0-84947996983 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Knowledge Foundation, 20100314
Note

A preliminary version of this paper was published in the proceedings of CPSNA 2013. This work was supported by the US National Science Foundation, awards NSF-CPS-1136099/1136104, the Swedish Knowledge Foundation (KK) and the Center for Research on Embedded Systems (CERES) grant number 20100314, and EPSRC grant number EP/C01037X/1.

Available from: 2015-12-02 Created: 2015-12-02 Last updated: 2018-03-22Bibliographically approved
Taha, W., Hedström, L.-G., Xu, F., Duracz, A., Bartha, F. A., Zeng, Y., . . . Gunjan, G. (2016). Flipping a First Course on Cyber-Physical Systems – An Experience Report. In: Proceedings Of The 2016 Workshop On Embedded And Cyber-Physical Systems Education (Wese): . Paper presented at Workshop on Embedded and Cyber-Physical Systems Education (WESE 2016), Pittsburgh, PA, USA, Oct. 1-6, 2016. New York: ACM Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Flipping a First Course on Cyber-Physical Systems – An Experience Report
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2016 (English)In: Proceedings Of The 2016 Workshop On Embedded And Cyber-Physical Systems Education (Wese), New York: ACM Press, 2016Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The flipped classroom format involves swapping activities traditionally performed inside and outside the classroom. The expected effects from this swap include increased student engagement and peer-to-peer interaction in the classroom, as well as more flexible access to learning materials. Key criteria for successful outcomes from these effects include improved test scores and enhanced student satisfaction. Unfortunately, while many researchers have reported positive outcomes from the approach, some instructors can still encounter difficulties in reproducing this success.

In this paper we report our experiences with flipping a first course on Cyber-Physical Systems at Halmstad University. The course is required for a Masters level program and is available as an elective for undergraduates. The focus of this report is on three separate editions of the course taught over three years. In the first year, lectures were recorded. In the second, the same instructor taught the course using the flipped format. In the third, new instructors taught it using the flipped classroom format.

Our experience suggests that flipping a classroom can lead to improved student performance and satisfaction from the first edition. It can also enable new instructors to take over the course and perform at a level comparable to an experienced instructor. On the other hand, it also suggests that the format may require more effort to prepare for, and to teach, than the traditional format, and that a higher level of attention to detail is needed to execute it with positive outcomes. Thus, the format can be demanding for instructors. It is also the case that not all students preferred this format.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: ACM Press, 2016
Keywords
Flipped Classroom, Cyber-Physical Systems, Embedded Systems
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-32093 (URN)10.1145/3005329.3005337 (DOI)000406149500008 ()2-s2.0-85009773542 (Scopus ID)978-1-450-34657-3 (ISBN)
Conference
Workshop on Embedded and Cyber-Physical Systems Education (WESE 2016), Pittsburgh, PA, USA, Oct. 1-6, 2016
Projects
FAR-EIS
Funder
Knowledge Foundation
Note

Funding: US National Science Foundation (NSF) through the NSF CPS Project #1136099, and the Swedish Knowledge Foundation (KK) Project FAR-EIS.

Available from: 2016-09-27 Created: 2016-09-27 Last updated: 2018-03-22Bibliographically approved
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-7545-9145

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