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Karlsson, Göran, UniversitetslektorORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-2545-7747
Publications (10 of 16) Show all publications
Karlsson, G. & Nilsson, P. (2019). A Web-Based Guiding Framework for Student Teachers' Self-Reflective Practice. International Journal of Web-Based Learning and Teaching Technologies, 14(3), 39-54
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Web-Based Guiding Framework for Student Teachers' Self-Reflective Practice
2019 (English)In: International Journal of Web-Based Learning and Teaching Technologies, ISSN 1548-1093, E-ISSN 1548-1107, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 39-54Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Self-reflection based on video analysis of one’s own teaching performance has proven to be a powerful method for developing student teachers´ professional knowledge. The aim of this study was to investigate how a web-based guiding framework involving the use of a pedagogical tool for planning and reflection in conjunction with annotated video recorded lessons, written reflections and a teacher educator’s feedback, might provide a beneficial method for student teachers’ self-reflection. The study included 56 student teachers performing their in-service training in science teaching. The student teachers completed a questionnaire where they had to respond to statements about their experiences of the framework. The results indicate that a guiding framework that includes analysis of video-recorded teaching is essential for a self-reflective process to become effective. Further development of the framework is to enable student teachers to participate in synchronous discussions with peers and teacher educators about their video-recorded lesson.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hershey, PA: IGI Global, 2019
Keywords
Content Representation, Guiding Framework, Reflective writing, Self-reflection, Teacher Education, Video Analysis, Video Annotation, Web-based Learning
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-38350 (URN)10.4018/IJWLTT.2019070104 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-11-15 Created: 2018-11-15 Last updated: 2019-08-01Bibliographically approved
Nilsson, P. & Karlsson, G. (2019). Capturing student teachers’ pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) using CoRes and digital technology. International Journal of Science Education, 41(4), 419-447
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Capturing student teachers’ pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) using CoRes and digital technology
2019 (English)In: International Journal of Science Education, ISSN 0950-0693, E-ISSN 1464-5289, Vol. 41, no 4, p. 419-447Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

During the last decades, digital technologies have become more common in providing opportunities for reflection and in-depth analysis of classroom practices and have afforded new ways of organizing teacher education. In particular, videotaped lessons have proven to be a valuable tool for capturing teaching episodes, subsequent reflection and development of student teachers’ professional knowledge, here referred to as ‘pedagogical content knowledge’ (PCK). The aim of this project was to investigate how the use of the reflective tool, content representations (CoRes) in combination with video and associated digital tools might be used as a means for capturing student teachers’ professional knowledge of practice. In the study we explore how a group of 24 secondary science student teachers were provided with Content Representations (CoRe) and video annotations to support their reflection-on-actionduring their practicum. Video annotations, alongside a written reflection of critical incidents in the student teachers’ teaching constituted data for analysis. Our findings suggest that the different tools enabled the student teachers to connect captured examples of teaching instances with theoretical issues, and in this way offered the ability to see as well as to analyse their teaching practice. As such, the CoRe, together with the video annotation tool, proved to be successful in scaffolding and structuring student teachers’ reflection-on-action, allowing them to connect their reflections to components of PCK and further to articulate connections between these components. © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxon: Routledge, 2019
Keywords
Digital technology, PCK, reflection, student teachers, teacher education
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-38353 (URN)10.1080/09500693.2018.1551642 (DOI)2-s2.0-85058690617 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-11-15 Created: 2018-11-15 Last updated: 2019-02-28Bibliographically approved
Stahre Wästberg, B., Eriksson, T., Karlsson, G., Sunnerstam, M., Axelsson, M. & Billger, M. (2019). Design considerations for virtual laboratories: A comparative study of two virtual laboratories for learning about gas solubility and colour appearance. Education and Information Technologies: Official Journal of the IFIP technical committee on Education, 24(3), 2059-2080
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Design considerations for virtual laboratories: A comparative study of two virtual laboratories for learning about gas solubility and colour appearance
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Education and Information Technologies: Official Journal of the IFIP technical committee on Education, ISSN 1360-2357, E-ISSN 1573-7608, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 2059-2080Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Building a virtual laboratory for teaching and learning is a highly complex process, incorporating diverse areas such as interaction design, visualisation, and pedagogy. This article focuses on the production and implementation issues that were found in the comparison of two different virtual laboratory projects, and discuss which design considerations can be drawn from these observations. Two web-based virtual laboratories - the Gas Laboratory and the Virtual Colour Laboratory - were developed independently of each other within two different content areas. The laboratories share considerable overlaps in goals and production circumstances. Through a comparison of production and outcome, similar problems related to design, development and implementation were observed. The research uses a mixed method approach combining quantitative pre- and post-tests for assessments, qualitative surveys, and qualitative, ethnographic observations and interviews. By comparing the background material, five design challenges for developing virtual laboratories are identified: 1) how to balance ambitions with available resources; 2) how to balance intended levels of user interaction with exploratory freedom; 3) how to find appropriate levels of realism depending on target group; 4) how to choose between mimicking real world appearance and enhanced features; and 5) how to find the best learning situation for the virtual laboratory. To meet these challenges, the following design considerations are proposed: Guide the design work with a clear understanding of purpose and context; select appropriate technology to ensure efficient design and media usage; select level of realism considering purpose and end users; and provide learning guides before and after the virtual lab session. © 2019, The Author(s).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York, NY: Springer-Verlag New York, 2019
Keywords
Virtual laboratories, Cloned and enhanced laboratories, User evaluation, Design considerations, Interactive learning environments, Interdisciplinary projects
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-38773 (URN)10.1007/s10639-018-09857-0 (DOI)2-s2.0-85060024906 (Scopus ID)
Projects
BioHOPE
Funder
Wallenberg Foundations, KAW 2004.0184Swedish Research Council Formas, 2004–421–360-31
Note

Funding: The Gas Laboratory was part of the larger BioHOPE project, which was supported by Wallenberg Global Learning Network (KAW 2004.0184). The Colour Laboratory was supported by The Swedish Research Council for Environment, Agricultural Sciences and Spatial Planning (Formas) (2004–421–360-31). The production of this article did not receive any specific grant from funding agencies in the public, commercial, or not-for-profit sectors.

Available from: 2019-01-19 Created: 2019-01-19 Last updated: 2019-05-09Bibliographically approved
Karlsson, G. (2018). Virtual laboratory work for discovering gas solubility in water: Effects of altered guiding structures. In: Ramesh C. Sharma (Ed.), Innovative Applications of Online Pedagogy and Course Design: (pp. 281-297). Hershey, PA: IGI Global
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Virtual laboratory work for discovering gas solubility in water: Effects of altered guiding structures
2018 (English)In: Innovative Applications of Online Pedagogy and Course Design / [ed] Ramesh C. Sharma, Hershey, PA: IGI Global, 2018, p. 281-297Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Compared to hands-on experiments, virtual laboratory work has the advantage of being both more cost- and time-effective, but also invokes questions about its explorative capacities. The aim of this chapter is to study how students' scientific reasoning was contingent on altered guiding structures within a virtual laboratory experiment. The virtual laboratory was developed through a design experiment involving three successive versions with altered guiding structures. Analysis of 12 dyads' reasoning about gas solubility in water revealed that the problem was not primarily for the students to realize how the volume of gas changed, but rather to understand the concept of solubility of gases. It was also observed how the guiding structures within each version influenced the students' reasoning about the studied phenomenon in certain trajectories.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hershey, PA: IGI Global, 2018
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-38349 (URN)10.4018/978-1-5225-5466-0 (DOI)978-1-522-55466-0 (ISBN)978-1-522-55467-7 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-11-15 Created: 2018-11-15 Last updated: 2018-11-20Bibliographically approved
Karlsson, G. (2018). Virtual laboratory work with modified guiding structures. In: L. Gómez Chova, A. López Martínez & I. Candel Torres (Ed.), INTED2018 Proceedings: 12th International Technology, Education and Development Conference, 5-7, 2018, Valencia, Spain. Paper presented at 12th International Technology, Education and Development Conference (INTED2018), 5-7 March, 2018, Valencia, Spain (pp. 7642-7647). Valencia: IATED Academy
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Virtual laboratory work with modified guiding structures
2018 (English)In: INTED2018 Proceedings: 12th International Technology, Education and Development Conference, 5-7, 2018, Valencia, Spain / [ed] L. Gómez Chova, A. López Martínez & I. Candel Torres, Valencia: IATED Academy , 2018, p. 7642-7647Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Laboratory work in science education is considered essential for students’ conceptual understanding of natural phenomena. Virtual laboratory work, compared to hands-on experiments, has the advantage of being both more cost- and time-effective, but it also invokes questions about its explorative capacities. Like all educational tools, digital learning materials involve certain problems, and educational gains from technical innovations cannot be taken for granted. To help students discover the intended scientific concept in simulated learning environments, guiding structures designed to support the learning process are recommended. An online virtual laboratory with the intention to give students the opportunity to discover oxygen and carbon dioxide solubility in water at various environmental conditions was created. In a design experiment, three successive versions of the virtual laboratory was developed; each with an increased degree of guiding structures. The aim of this research was to study how students’ scientific reasoning was contingent on the modified guiding structures within the virtual laboratory experiment. The students had to work in pairs and four student pairs were randomly selected at each test cycle to be video-recorded while conducting their collaborative work in the virtual laboratory. Thus, video recordings of four student dyads represented each version. Analysis of the 12 dyads’ reasoning about gas solubility in water revealed that the problem was not primarily for the students to realise how the volume of gas changed, but rather to understand the concept of solubility of gases in water. It was also observed how the guiding structures within each version influenced the students’ reasoning about the studied phenomenon in certain trajectories. The structure of guidance within the different versions of the virtual laboratory affected students’ scientific reasoning about the studied phenomenon in certain trajectories. So for example, the more guided structures the virtual lab was furnished with, the less the students reasoned about the investigated phenomenon. These results suggest that furnishing a virtual laboratory with an increased amount of guiding structures and aid enables students to produce the right answer on a test, but also risks quenching students’ constructive discussions and their discovery process. Thus, it is incumbent on designers of digital learning resources to decide what kind of scaffolding should be implemented in relation to the learners pre-knowledge, and how much one intends them to discover by themselves. The next development for this area of research is to focus on how results from this design-based study can contribute to improvements in the design of virtual laboratories, which has the potential to complement traditional laboratory work.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Valencia: IATED Academy, 2018
Series
INTED Proceedings, ISSN 2340-1079
Keywords
virtual laboratory, online learning resource, gas solubility in water, guiding structures, design experiment, scientific reasoning
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-36520 (URN)10.21125/inted.2018.1813 (DOI)978-84-697-9480-7 (ISBN)
Conference
12th International Technology, Education and Development Conference (INTED2018), 5-7 March, 2018, Valencia, Spain
Available from: 2018-03-25 Created: 2018-03-25 Last updated: 2018-03-26Bibliographically approved
Karlsson, G. & Nilsson, P. (2017). Artefacts for Developing Student Teachers´ Professional Knowledge Through Self-Reflective Practice. In: L. Gómez Chova, A. López Martínez & I. Candel Torres (Ed.), ICERI2017 Proceedings: . Paper presented at ICERI2017, the 10th annual International Conference of Education, Research and Innovation, November 16-18, 2017, Seville, Spain (pp. 363-370). Sevilla: IATED Academy
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Artefacts for Developing Student Teachers´ Professional Knowledge Through Self-Reflective Practice
2017 (English)In: ICERI2017 Proceedings / [ed] L. Gómez Chova, A. López Martínez & I. Candel Torres, Sevilla: IATED Academy , 2017, p. 363-370Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Digital technologies have afforded new ways of organizing teacher education and enable for extramural activities. By associating captured video episodes with related teaching concerns it might be possible to extend student teachers´ self-reflection and at the same time, allow for accurate supervision feedback without the constraints of time and location.

The aim of this study was to investigate how a guiding framework consisting of a pedagogical tool, annotated video recorded lessons, reflective writing, combined with a tutors’ feedback, might provide an affordable method for student teachers´ self-reflection on their teaching.

The study included 28 student teachers who practiced teaching science subjects in Swedish secondary schools. The participating student teachers set up a CoRe (Content Representation) for a chosen topic and video recorded a lessons. The video recorded lesson then had to be annotated; exposing critical incidents in relation to their CoRe and to be complemented with a written reflection. This was sent to their tutor who provided the student with a feedback that was in its turn to be commented on by the student. At the end of their assignment all participants completed a questionnaire where they had to respond to six questions about their experience of the guiding framework and grade them from one to five. They were also asked to give a written explanation for their choice and in groups, discussed how the framework could be developed. This provided both qualitative and quantitative data, which were analyzed statistically and thematically, respectively.

From the results it was obvious that the student teachers had found the activity to be of great assistance for the development of their self-reflective practice. Comments on this were; the advantages of seeing themselves from a pupil’s perspective and direct their attention on specific learning concerns. The pedagogical tool CoRe was experienced as valuable for structuring and reflecting on their teaching, even if it was not seen as necessary per se for a video stimulated self-reflection. The annotations were perceived as facilitating as it made them examine their video thoroughly and concretize what happened in particular incidents. A written account was likewise seen as beneficial as it obliged them to put into words, and connect the process of planning, doing and reflecting. Some, however, remarked that it would have been valuable to discuss their lesson with e.g. colleagues or a more experienced teacher. Comments from a tutor were seen as valuable as it made them see additional aspects of their teaching and helped them reconsider their own inferences.

It can be concluded that an integrated use of digital and other artefacts for a structured self-reflective process has the potential to develop student teachers’ professional knowledge and augment teacher education in several aspects. Each of the integrated artefacts in the framework filled an important role for a self-reflective practice and can be applied in distance education with the aid of digital technologies.

The guiding framework was by the participants seen as advantageous although there might be other artefacts for video stimulated self-reflection which can be taken in consideration. There are also potentials for development of the framework in e.g. enabling synchronic discussions about the lesson with peers and tutors.

© 2017, IATED

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sevilla: IATED Academy, 2017
Series
ICERI Proceedings, ISSN 2340-1095
Keywords
self-reflection, guided framework, artefacts, digital technologies, teacher education, video annotation, pedagogical content knowledge, content representation
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-35465 (URN)978-84-697-6957-7 (ISBN)
Conference
ICERI2017, the 10th annual International Conference of Education, Research and Innovation, November 16-18, 2017, Seville, Spain
Available from: 2017-11-23 Created: 2017-11-23 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
Karlsson, G. (2015). Students' Joint Reasoning about Gas Solubility in Water in Modified Versions of a Virtual Laboratory. International Journal of Online Pedagogy and Course Design, 5(4), 67-77
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Students' Joint Reasoning about Gas Solubility in Water in Modified Versions of a Virtual Laboratory
2015 (English)In: International Journal of Online Pedagogy and Course Design, ISSN 2155-6873, E-ISSN 2155-6881, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 67-77Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Laboratory work in science education is essential for students’ conceptual understanding of natural phenomena. Computer-simulated laboratory experiments have been proposed to facilitate traditional laboratory work. A virtual laboratory was designed to enable students to collaboratively discover the concept of gas solubility in water at different physiological conditions. The virtual laboratory was developed through a design experiment involving three successive versions with different guiding structures. Analysis of 12 dyads’ reasoning about gas solubility in water revealed that the problem was not primarily for the students to realise how the volume of gas changed, but rather to understand the concept of solubility of gases. It was also observed how the guiding structures within the three different versions influenced the students’ reasoning about the concept. The analysis indicates that the affordances of virtual laboratories might, to a certain extent, enhance joint discovery of a scientific concept.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hershey, PA: IGI Global, 2015
Keywords
Virtual laboratory, guiding structures, gas solubility in water, discovery learning, scientific reasoning
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-28436 (URN)10.4018/IJOPCD.2015100105 (DOI)
Projects
Bio-HOPE
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation
Available from: 2015-06-07 Created: 2015-06-07 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Karlsson, G., Ivarsson, J. & Lindström, B. (2013). Agreed discoveries: students’ negotiations in a virtual laboratory experiment. Instructional science, 41(3), 455-480
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Agreed discoveries: students’ negotiations in a virtual laboratory experiment
2013 (English)In: Instructional science, ISSN 0020-4277, E-ISSN 1573-1952, Vol. 41, no 3, p. 455-480Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper presents an analysis of the scientific reasoning of a dyad of secondary school students about the phenomenon of dissolution of gases in water as they work on this in a simulated laboratory experiment. A web-based virtual laboratory was developed to provide learners with the opportunity to examine the influence of physical factors on gas solubility in water. An evaluation process involving 180 students revealed that the concepts connected to the dissolution of gas in water caused problems for the students even after having experimented with the virtual laboratory. To investigate the nature of learners' reasoning about the visualised events, 13 video-recorded groups of learners were analysed. This study follows the reasoning of one group that displayed a possibly productive way of solving the problem. The results address the students' general difficulty of discovering something that they are conceptually unprepared for within the virtual laboratory. The analysis shows how the students eventually found a way out of their dilemma by making an analogy with other dissolving processes. In effect, the analysis elucidates some of the analytical work that had to be done by the participants when collaboratively negotiating a shared meaning of a scientific concept in concord with a given task and set of instructional materials. Implications for design might be to provide the learning material with explicit hints that enable students to connect to specific phenomena related to the one investigated concept. The findings show the usefulness of video analytic research, informed by CA and ethnomethodology. This analytical framework can support design processes and provide useful information, which might identify hurdles to learning a scientific concept by simulated events and pathways to overcome these hurdles. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Dordrecht: Springer Netherlands, 2013
Keywords
Virtual laboratory work, Concept of gas solubility in water, Discovery learning, Scientific reasoning, Collaborative negotiating
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-30157 (URN)10.1007/s11251-012-9238-1 (DOI)000316289700001 ()2-s2.0-84874988083 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Bio-HOPE
Note

The Bio-HOPE project was founded by the Wallenberg Global Learning Network (WGLN). The project was brought about as a co-operative enterprise between Stanford University, University of Gothenburg and Linköping University. The work reported here has been supported by the Linnaeus Centre for Research on Learning, Interaction, and Mediated Communication in Contemporary Society (LinCS).

Available from: 2016-01-13 Created: 2016-01-13 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Karlsson, G., Eriksson, T., Sunnerstam, M. & Axelsson, M. (2013). Joint reasoning about gas solubility in water in modified versions of a virtual laboratory. In: Nikol Rummel, Manu Kapur, Mitchell Nathan & Sadhana Puntambekar (Ed.), To See the World and  a Grain of Sand: Learning across Levels of Space, Time, and Scale: CSCL 2013 Conference Proceedings Volume 2 — Short Papers, Panels, Posters, Demos, & Community Events. Paper presented at 10th International Conference on Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning – CSCL 2013, Madison, WI, United States, 15-19 June, 2013 (pp. 283-284). International Society of the Learning Sciences, 2
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Joint reasoning about gas solubility in water in modified versions of a virtual laboratory
2013 (English)In: To See the World and  a Grain of Sand: Learning across Levels of Space, Time, and Scale: CSCL 2013 Conference Proceedings Volume 2 — Short Papers, Panels, Posters, Demos, & Community Events / [ed] Nikol Rummel, Manu Kapur, Mitchell Nathan & Sadhana Puntambekar, International Society of the Learning Sciences, 2013, Vol. 2, p. 283-284Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

A virtual laboratory was designed to enable students to collaboratively discover the concept of gas solubility in water at different physiological conditions. The virtual laboratory was developed through a design experiment involving three successive versions with different guiding structures. Analysis of 13 dyads' reasoning about gas solubility in water revealed that the students' problem was to understand the concept of solubility of gases. It was also observed how the guiding structures within the three different versions influenced the students' reasoning about the concept. © ISLS.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
International Society of the Learning Sciences, 2013
Series
Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning, ISSN 1573-4552
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-30158 (URN)2-s2.0-84886468101 (Scopus ID)
Conference
10th International Conference on Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning – CSCL 2013, Madison, WI, United States, 15-19 June, 2013
Projects
Bio-HOPE
Note

Support for the work reported here has been received from the Linnaeus Centre for Research on Learning, Interaction, and Mediated Communication in Contemporary Society (LinCS). The Bio-HOPE project was founded by the Wallenberg Global Learning Network (WGLN).

Available from: 2016-01-13 Created: 2016-01-13 Last updated: 2016-01-15Bibliographically approved
Karlsson, G. (2012). Instructional technologies in science education: Students’ scientific reasoning in collaborative classroom activities. (Doctoral dissertation). Göteborg: Göteborgs universitet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Instructional technologies in science education: Students’ scientific reasoning in collaborative classroom activities
2012 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This study originates from an interest in how students interpret scientific concepts demonstrated with animated instructional technologies. Currently, science education makes use of diverse kinds of instructional methods. For the advancement of instruction, new technologies have continuously been employed. Such new instructional technologies have always been accompanied with expectations that they should reform teaching. The availability of IT in schools and the selection of animated displays for instructional purposes provide new opportunities for education. This thesis accounts for three empirical studies of students’ collaborative work with instructional technologies. For the purpose of studying students’ scientific reasoning, two kinds of animated instructional technologies were designed. The three studies focused on designing and exploring the whole educational intervention and are located in the area of design-based research. They provide detailed analyses of secondary school students’ collaboration on an assignment of giving a joint written account of the instructed concept. Analytically, this is done within a socio-cultural framework that uses interaction analysis inspired by ideas from conversation analysis and ethnomethodology. Study I and Study II report observations from instructional technologies that deal with the flow of materials in the carbon cycle. The two studies were connected, as the outcomes from the first study informed the educational framing of the second study. Study III reports findings from a sub-study of a design experiment where students worked in a virtual laboratory to learn about the solubility of gas in water. The results from the studies show that students’ reasoning was influenced by several aspects, such as the characteristics of the animated display, language use, school cultural norms, the formulation of the assignment and the students’ pre-knowledge. The analyses also evinced that the students’ interpretation of a demonstrated concept often diverted from a canonical scientific one, which warns against assuming that the collaborative meaning-making of animated instructional technologies automatically leads to a creation of the desired scientific concept. These findings emphasise that when designing and applying animated instructional technologies in education, one has to consider a wider context where assignment formulation, teacher guidance, school culture and semiotic processes influence how students approach and frame their assignment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Göteborg: Göteborgs universitet, 2012. p. 127
Series
Studies in applied information technology, ISSN 1652-490X ; 11
Keywords
Instructional technologies, animations, design-based research, interaction analysis, science education
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-30160 (URN)978-91-628-8441-3 (ISBN)
Public defence
2012-03-30, Quark, plan 3, Patricia, Forskningsgången 6, Göteborg, 13:15
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2016-01-14 Created: 2016-01-13 Last updated: 2016-06-22Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-2545-7747

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