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David, J., Valencia, R., Philippsen, R., Bosshard, P. & Iagnemma, K. (2017). Gradient Based Path Optimization Method for Autonomous Driving. In: 2017 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS): . Paper presented at IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS), Vancouver CB, Canada, Sept. 24-28, 2017 (pp. 4501-4508). [Piscataway, NJ]: IEEE
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2017 (English)In: 2017 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS), [Piscataway, NJ]: IEEE, 2017, p. 4501-4508Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper discusses the possibilities of extending and adapting the CHOMP motion planner to work with a non-holonomic vehicle such as an autonomous truck with a single trailer. A detailed study has been done to find out the different ways of implementing these constraints on the motion planner. CHOMP, which is a successful motion planner for articulated robots produces very fast and collision-free trajectories. This nature is important for a local path adaptor in a multi-vehicle path planning for resolving path-conflicts in a very fast manner and hence, CHOMP was adapted. Secondly, this paper also details the experimental integration of the modified CHOMP with the sensor fusion and control system of an autonomous Volvo FH-16 truck. Integration experiments were conducted in a real-time environment with the developed autonomous truck. Finally, additional simulations were also conducted to compare the performance of the different approaches developed to study the feasibility of employing CHOMP to autonomous vehicles. ©2017 IEEE

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
[Piscataway, NJ]: IEEE, 2017
Series
IEEE International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, E-ISSN 2153-0866
Keywords
Robotics, Intelligent Transportation Systems, Autonomous Vehicle Navigation, Motion and Path Planning
National Category
Computer Vision and Robotics (Autonomous Systems)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-34851 (URN)10.1109/IROS.2017.8206318 (DOI)978-1-5386-2682-5 (ISBN)978-1-5386-2681-8 (ISBN)978-1-5386-2683-2 (ISBN)
Conference
IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS), Vancouver CB, Canada, Sept. 24-28, 2017
Projects
Cargo-ANTs
Funder
EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, FP7-605598
Available from: 2017-08-31 Created: 2017-08-31 Last updated: 2018-01-25Bibliographically approved
David, J., Valencia, R., Philippsen, R. & Iagnemma, K. (2017). Local Path Optimizer for an Autonomous Truck in a Harbour Scenario. In: : . Paper presented at 11th Conference on Field and Service Robotics (FSR), Zürich, Switzerland, 12-15 September, 2017.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Local Path Optimizer for an Autonomous Truck in a Harbour Scenario
2017 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Recently, functional gradient algorithms like CHOMP have been very successful in producing locally optimal motion plans for articulated robots. In this paper, we have adapted CHOMP to work with a non-holonomic vehicle such as an autonomous truck with a single trailer and a differential drive robot. An extended CHOMP with rolling constraints have been implemented on both of these setup which yielded feasible curvatures. This paper details the experimental integration of the extended CHOMP motion planner with the sensor fusion and control system of an autonomous Volvo FH-16 truck. It also explains the experiments conducted on the differential-drive robot. Initial experimental investigations and results conducted in a real-world environment show that CHOMP can produce smooth and collision-free trajectories for mobile robots and vehicles as well. In conclusion, this paper discusses the feasibility of employing CHOMP to mobile robots.

Keywords
robotics
National Category
Robotics Computer Vision and Robotics (Autonomous Systems)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-34850 (URN)
Conference
11th Conference on Field and Service Robotics (FSR), Zürich, Switzerland, 12-15 September, 2017
Projects
Cargo-ANTs
Funder
EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, FP7-605598
Available from: 2017-08-31 Created: 2017-08-31 Last updated: 2019-01-29Bibliographically approved
Taha, W., Duracz, A., Zeng, Y., Atkinson, K., Bartha, F. Á., Brauner, P., . . . Grante, C. (2016). Acumen: An Open-source Testbed for Cyber-Physical Systems Research. In: Benny Mandler, Johann Marquez-Barja, Miguel Elias Mitre Campista, Dagmar Cagáňová, Hakima Chaouchi, Sherali Zeadally, Mohamad Badra, Stefano Giordano, Maria Fazio, Andrey Somov & Radu-Laurentiu Vieriu (Ed.), Internet of Things. IoT Infrastructures: Second International Summit, IoT 360° 2015, Rome, Italy, October 27-29, 2015. Revised Selected Papers, Part I. Paper presented at EAI International Conference on CYber physiCaL systems, iOt and sensors Networks (CYCLONE '15), Rome, Italy, October 26, 2015 (pp. 118-130). Heidelberg: Springer, 169
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Acumen: An Open-source Testbed for Cyber-Physical Systems Research
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2016 (English)In: Internet of Things. IoT Infrastructures: Second International Summit, IoT 360° 2015, Rome, Italy, October 27-29, 2015. Revised Selected Papers, Part I / [ed] Benny Mandler, Johann Marquez-Barja, Miguel Elias Mitre Campista, Dagmar Cagáňová, Hakima Chaouchi, Sherali Zeadally, Mohamad Badra, Stefano Giordano, Maria Fazio, Andrey Somov & Radu-Laurentiu Vieriu, Heidelberg: Springer, 2016, Vol. 169, p. 118-130Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Developing Cyber-Physical Systems requires methods and tools to support simulation and verification of hybrid (both continuous and discrete) models. The Acumen modeling and simulation language is an open source testbed for exploring the design space of what rigorous-but-practical next-generation tools can deliver to developers of Cyber-Physical Systems. Like verification tools, a design goal for Acumen is to provide rigorous results. Like simulation tools, it aims to be intuitive, practical, and scalable. However, it is far from evident whether these two goals can be achieved simultaneously.

This paper explains the primary design goals for Acumen, the core challenges that must be addressed in order to achieve these goals, the "agile research method" taken by the project, the steps taken to realize these goals, the key lessons learned, and the emerging language design. © ICST Institute for Computer Sciences, Social Informatics and Telecommunications Engineering 2016.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Heidelberg: Springer, 2016
Series
Lecture Notes of the Institute for Computer Sciences, Social Informatics and Telecommunications Engineering, ISSN 1867-8211 ; 169
Keywords
Testbed, Cyber-Physical Systems (CPS), Modeling, Simulation, Hybrid Systems, Open Source Software
National Category
Computer Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-29592 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-47063-4_11 (DOI)000398616500011 ()2-s2.0-85000500985 (Scopus ID)978-3-319-47062-7 (ISBN)978-3-319-47063-4 (ISBN)
Conference
EAI International Conference on CYber physiCaL systems, iOt and sensors Networks (CYCLONE '15), Rome, Italy, October 26, 2015
Funder
Knowledge FoundationVINNOVA, 2011-01819
Note

This work was supported by US NSF award CPS-1136099, the Swedish Knowledge Foundation (KK), The Center for Research on Embedded Systems (CERES), and VINNOVA (Dnr. 2011-01819).

Available from: 2015-10-08 Created: 2015-10-08 Last updated: 2018-03-22Bibliographically approved
Taha, W., Zeng, Y., Duracz, A., Xu, F., Atkinson, K., Brauner, P., . . . Philippsen, R. (2016). Developing a first course on cyber-physical systems. ACM SIGBED Review, 14(1), 44-52
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Developing a first course on cyber-physical systems
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2016 (English)In: ACM SIGBED Review, E-ISSN 1551-3688, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 44-52Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Effective and creative Cyber-Physical Systems (CPS) development requires expertise in disparate fields that have traditionally been taught in several distinct disciplines. At the same time, students seeking a CPS education generally come from diverse educational backgrounds. In this paper, we report on our recent experience of developing and teaching a course on CPS. The course addresses the following three questions: What are the core elements of CPS? How should these core concepts be integrated in the CPS design process? What types of modeling tools can assist in the design of Cyber-Physical Systems? Our experience with the first four offerings of the course has been positive overall. We also discuss the lessons we learned from some issues that were not handled well. All material including lecture notes and software used for the course are openly available online.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York, NY: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2016
National Category
Computer Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-36619 (URN)10.1145/3036686.3036692 (DOI)
Note

This work is based on an earlier work: Developing a First Course on Cyber-Physical Systems, in Workshop on Embedded and Cyber-Physical Systems Education, WESE, © ACM, 2014. http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2829957.2829964. The primary support for the development of the course comes from Halmstad University, the Swedish Knowledge Foundation’s CERES centre at Halmstad University, the Swedish Knowledge Foundation’s FAR-EIS project, and the US National Science Foundation CPS Robot Design project. 

Available from: 2018-04-16 Created: 2018-04-16 Last updated: 2018-04-17Bibliographically approved
Zeng, Y., Chad, R., Taha, W., Duracz, A., Atkinson, K., Philippsen, R., . . . O'Malley, M. (2016). Modeling Electromechanical Aspects of Cyber-Physical Systems. Journal of Software Engineering for Robotics, 7(1), 100-119
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Modeling Electromechanical Aspects of Cyber-Physical Systems
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2016 (English)In: Journal of Software Engineering for Robotics, ISSN 2035-3928, E-ISSN 2035-3928, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 100-119Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Model-based tools have the potential to significantly improve the process of developing novel cyber-physical systems (CPS). In this paper, we consider the question of what language features are needed to model such systems. We use a small, experimental hybrid systems modeling language to show how a number of basic and pervasive aspects of cyber-physical systems can be modeled concisely using the small set of language constructs. We then consider four, more complex, case studies from the domain of robotics. The first, a quadcopter, illustrates that these constructs can support the modeling of interesting systems. The second, a serial robot, provides a concrete example of why it is important to support static partial derivatives, namely, that it significantly improves the way models of rigid body dynamics can be expressed. The third, a linear solenoid actuator, illustrates the language’s ability to integrate multiphysics subsystems. The fourth and final, a compass gait biped, shows how a hybrid system with non-trivial dynamics is modeled. Through this analysis, the work establishes a strong connection between the engineering needs of the CPS domain and the language features that can address these needs. The study builds the case for why modeling languages can be improved by integrating several features, most notably, partial derivatives, differentiation without duplication, and support for equations. These features do not appear to be addressed in a satisfactory manner in mainstream modeling and simulation tools.

Keywords
Domain-Specific Language, Cyber-Physical Systems
National Category
Engineering and Technology Computer Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-32091 (URN)
Funder
Knowledge Foundation
Note

Funding: US NSF CPS award (No.1136099), Swedish KK-Foundation, CERES and CAISR Centres, and the Swedish SSF NG-Test

Available from: 2016-09-27 Created: 2016-09-27 Last updated: 2018-03-22Bibliographically approved
Mühlfellner, P., Bürki, M., Bosse, M., Derendarz, W., Philippsen, R. & Furgale, P. (2016). Summary Maps for Lifelong Visual Localization. Journal of Field Robotics, 33(5), 561-590
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Summary Maps for Lifelong Visual Localization
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2016 (English)In: Journal of Field Robotics, ISSN 1556-4959, E-ISSN 1556-4967, Vol. 33, no 5, p. 561-590Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Robots that use vision for localization need to handle environments which are subject to seasonal and structural change, and operate under changing lighting and weather conditions. We present a framework for lifelong localization and mapping designed to provide robust and metrically accurate online localization in these kinds of changing environments. Our system iterates between offline map building, map summary, and online localization. The offline mapping fuses data from multiple visually varied datasets, thus dealing with changing environments by incorporating new information. Before passing this data to the online localization system, the map is summarized, selecting only the landmarks that are deemed useful for localization. This Summary Map enables online localization that is accurate and robust to the variation of visual information in natural environments while still being computationally efficient.

We present a number of summary policies for selecting useful features for localization from the multi-session map and explore the tradeoff between localization performance and computational complexity. The system is evaluated on 77 recordings, with a total length of 30 kilometers, collected outdoors over sixteen months. These datasets cover all seasons, various times of day, and changing weather such as sunshine, rain, fog, and snow. We show that it is possible to build consistent maps that span data collected over an entire year, and cover day-to-night transitions. Simple statistics computed on landmark observations are enough to produce a Summary Map that enables robust and accurate localization over a wide range of seasonal, lighting, and weather conditions. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, 2016
Keywords
Field robotics
National Category
Robotics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-27978 (URN)10.1002/rob.21595 (DOI)000380103400001 ()2-s2.0-84931069651 (Scopus ID)
Funder
EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, 269916EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, 610603
Note

This work is supported in part by the European Community’s Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under Grants No. 269916 (V-Charge) and No. 610603 (EUROPA2).

Available from: 2015-03-12 Created: 2015-03-12 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Gholami Shahbandi, S., Åstrand, B. & Philippsen, R. (2015). Semi-Supervised Semantic Labeling of Adaptive Cell Decomposition Maps in Well-Structured Environments. In: 2015 European Conference on Mobile Robots (ECMR): . Paper presented at 7th European Conference on Mobile Robots 2015, Lincoln, United Kingdom, 2-4 September, 2015. Piscataway, NJ: IEEE Press, Article ID 7324207.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Semi-Supervised Semantic Labeling of Adaptive Cell Decomposition Maps in Well-Structured Environments
2015 (English)In: 2015 European Conference on Mobile Robots (ECMR), Piscataway, NJ: IEEE Press, 2015, article id 7324207Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

We present a semi-supervised approach for semantic mapping, by introducing human knowledge after unsupervised place categorization has been combined with an adaptive cell decomposition of an occupancy map. Place categorization is based on clustering features extracted from raycasting in the occupancy map. The cell decomposition is provided by work we published previously, which is effective for the maps that could be abstracted by straight lines. Compared to related methods, our approach obviates the need for a low-level link between human knowledge and the perception and mapping sub-system, or the onerous preparation of training data for supervised learning. Application scenarios include intelligent warehouse robots which need a heightened awareness in order to operate with a higher degree of autonomy and flexibility, and integrate more fully with inventory management systems. The approach is shown to be robust and flexible with respect to different types of environments and sensor setups. © 2015 IEEE

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Piscataway, NJ: IEEE Press, 2015
Keywords
Continuous wavelet transforms, Feature extraction, Labeling, Robot sensing systems, Robustness, Semantics
National Category
Robotics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-29343 (URN)10.1109/ECMR.2015.7324207 (DOI)000380213600041 ()2-s2.0-84962293280 (Scopus ID)978-1-4673-9163-4 (ISBN)978-1-4673-9163-15 (ISBN)
Conference
7th European Conference on Mobile Robots 2015, Lincoln, United Kingdom, 2-4 September, 2015
Projects
AIMS
Funder
Knowledge Foundation
Note

This work was supported by the Swedish Knowledge Foundation and industry partners Kollmorgen, Optronic, and Toyota Material Handling Europe.

Available from: 2015-09-01 Created: 2015-09-01 Last updated: 2018-05-02Bibliographically approved
David, J. & Philippsen, R. (2015). Task assignment and trajectory planning in dynamic environments for multiple vehicles. Paper presented at The Thirteenth Scandinavian Conference on Artificial Intelligence, Halmstad, Sweden, 4-5 November, 2015. Frontiers in Artificial Intelligence and Applications, 278, 179-181
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Task assignment and trajectory planning in dynamic environments for multiple vehicles
2015 (English)In: Frontiers in Artificial Intelligence and Applications, ISSN 0922-6389, E-ISSN 1879-8314, Vol. 278, p. 179-181Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We consider the problem of finding collision-free trajectories for a fleet of automated guided vehicles (AGVs) working in ship ports and freight terminals. Our solution computes collision-free trajectories for a fleet of AGVs to pick up one or more containers and transport it to a given goal without colliding with other AGVs and obstacles. We propose an integrated framework for solving the goal assignment and trajectory planning problem minimizing the maximum cost over all vehicle trajectories using the classical Hungarian algorithm. To deal with the dynamics in the environment, we refine our final trajectories with CHOMP (Covariant Hamiltonian optimization for motion planning) in order to trade off between path smoothness and dynamic obstacle avoidance. © 2015 The authors and IOS Press. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Washington, DC: IOS Press, 2015
Keywords
Artificial intelligence, Collision avoidance, Economic and social effects, Fleet operations, Motion planning, Redundant manipulators, Trajectories, Vehicles, Automated guided vehicles, Collision-free trajectory, Dynamic environments, Dynamic obstacle avoidance, Integrated frameworks, Multirobots, Path planners, Task assignment, Automatic guided vehicles
National Category
Robotics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-36556 (URN)10.3233/978-1-61499-589-0-179 (DOI)2-s2.0-84963701453 (Scopus ID)
Conference
The Thirteenth Scandinavian Conference on Artificial Intelligence, Halmstad, Sweden, 4-5 November, 2015
Available from: 2018-07-06 Created: 2018-07-06 Last updated: 2018-07-06Bibliographically approved
Ourique de Morais, W., Mayr, M., Wickström, N. & Philippsen, R. (2014). Ambient Intelligence and Robotics: complementing one another to support Ambient Assisted Living. In: Jangmyung Lee, Philippe Martinet, Marcus Strand, Stefano Ghidoni & Matteo Munaro (Ed.), IAS-13: The 13th International Conference on Intelligent Autonomous Systems: July 15-19, 2014: Padova and Venice, Italy: Proceedings of Workshops and Tutorials. Paper presented at 13th International Conference Intelligent Autonomous Systems, Padova & Venice, Italy, 15-19 July, 2014.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ambient Intelligence and Robotics: complementing one another to support Ambient Assisted Living
2014 (English)In: IAS-13: The 13th International Conference on Intelligent Autonomous Systems: July 15-19, 2014: Padova and Venice, Italy: Proceedings of Workshops and Tutorials / [ed] Jangmyung Lee, Philippe Martinet, Marcus Strand, Stefano Ghidoni & Matteo Munaro, 2014Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This work combines a database-centric architecture, which supports Ambient Intelligence (AmI) for Ambient Assisted Living, with a ROS-based mobile sensing and interaction robot. The role of the active database is to monitor and respond to events in the environment and the robot subscribes to tasks issued by the AmI system. The robot can autonomously perform tasks such as to search for and interact with a person. Consequently, the two systems combine their capabilities and complement the lack of computational, sensing and actuation resources.

Keywords
ambient intelligence, robotics, ambient assisted living
National Category
Robotics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-26240 (URN)10.13140/2.1.2505.8566 (DOI)978-88-95872-06-3 (ISBN)
Conference
13th International Conference Intelligent Autonomous Systems, Padova & Venice, Italy, 15-19 July, 2014
Available from: 2014-08-13 Created: 2014-08-13 Last updated: 2017-03-23Bibliographically approved
Taha, W., Cartwright, R., Philippsen, R. & Zeng, Y. (2014). Developing A First Course on Cyber-Physical Systems. In: Martin Edin Grimheden (Ed.), Proceedings of the WESE'14: Workshop on Embedded and Cyber-Physical Systems Education. Paper presented at 2014 Workshop on Embedded and Cyber-Physical Systems Education (WESE’14), New Delhi, India, October 12-17, 2014. New York, NY: ACM Press, Article ID 6.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Developing A First Course on Cyber-Physical Systems
2014 (English)In: Proceedings of the WESE'14: Workshop on Embedded and Cyber-Physical Systems Education / [ed] Martin Edin Grimheden, New York, NY: ACM Press, 2014, article id 6Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Effective and creative cyber-physical systems (CPS) development requires expertise in disparate fields that have traditionally been taught in several distinct disciplines. At the same time, students seeking a CPS education generally come from diverse educational backgrounds. In this paper, we report on our recent experience developing and teaching a course on CPS. The course addresses the following three questions: What are the core elements of CPS? How should these core concepts be integrated in the CPS design process? What types of modeling tools can assist in the design of cyber-physical systems? Our experience with the first three offerings of the course has been positive overall. We also discuss the lessons we learned from some issues that were not handled well. All material including lecture notes and software used for the course are openly available online. © 2014 ACM.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York, NY: ACM Press, 2014
National Category
Learning Computer and Information Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-30603 (URN)10.1145/2829957.2829964 (DOI)2-s2.0-84963760017 (Scopus ID)978-1-4503-3090-9 (ISBN)
Conference
2014 Workshop on Embedded and Cyber-Physical Systems Education (WESE’14), New Delhi, India, October 12-17, 2014
Funder
Knowledge Foundation
Note

This research was supported by Halmstad University, the Swedish Knowledge Foundation (KK) Centre CERES, the Swedish Knowledge Foundation (KK) Environment at Halmstad University, and US NSF CPS awards number 1136099 and 1136104.

Available from: 2016-03-30 Created: 2016-03-30 Last updated: 2018-03-22Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-3513-8854

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