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Clement, D., Ivarsson, A., Tranaeus, U., Johnson, U. & Stenling, A. (2018). Investigating the influence of intra-individual changes in perceived stress symptoms on injury risk in soccer. Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, 28(4), 1461-1466
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Investigating the influence of intra-individual changes in perceived stress symptoms on injury risk in soccer
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2018 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 1461-1466Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Research has shown that high levels of stress and stress responsivity can increase the risk of injuries. However, most of the research that has supported this notion has focused on between-person relationships, ignoring the relationships at the within-person level. As a result, the objective of this study was to investigate if within-person changes in perceived stress symptoms over a 1-month time period could predict injury rates during the subsequent 3 months. A prospective design with two measurement points (Time 1—at the beginning of the season and Time 2—1 month into the season) was utilized. A total of 121 competitive soccer players (85 males and 36 females; Mage = 18.39, SD = 3.08) from Sweden and the United States completed the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (KPDS) and a demographic sheet at Time 1. The KPDS was also completed at Time 2, and all acute injuries that occurred during the subsequent 3-month period were recorded. A Bayesian latent change scores model was used to determine whether within-person changes in stress symptoms could predict the risk of injury. Results revealed that there was a credible positive effect of changes in stress symptoms on injury rates, indicating that an increase in reported stress symptoms was related to an increased risk for injury. This finding highlights the importance of creating caring and supportive sporting environments and relationships and teaching stress management techniques, especially during the earlier portion of competitive seasons, to possibly reduce the occurrence of injuries. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Inc., 2018
Keywords
athletes, psychological predictors, sport injury, stress management
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-36307 (URN)10.1111/sms.13048 (DOI)2-s2.0-85041201109 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-02-16 Created: 2018-02-16 Last updated: 2018-07-05Bibliographically approved
Tranaeus, U., Ivarsson, A. & Johnson, U. (2018). Stress and injuries in elite sport. In: Reinhard Fuchs, Markus Gerber (Ed.), Handbuch Stressregulation und Sport: (pp. 451-466). Berlin: Springer Berlin/Heidelberg
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Stress and injuries in elite sport
2018 (English)In: Handbuch Stressregulation und Sport / [ed] Reinhard Fuchs, Markus Gerber, Berlin: Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2018, p. 451-466Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The chapter begins with an overview of research on psychological risk factors, “predictors”, for injury outcome focusing on competitive and elite sport populations. Based on this presentation, a summary of psychological studies with a special attention on prevention of injury outcome will be highlighted. The final part of the chapter sets the rehabilitation phase in the centre, specifically emphasising personal and situational factors influencing athletes’ injury reactions including return to sport aspects. © 2017 Springer International Publishing AG

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Berlin: Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2018
Series
Springer Reference Psychologie
Keywords
Intervention, Prevention, Rehabilitation, Return-to-sport, Risk factors
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-35128 (URN)10.1007/978-3-662-49322-9_22 (DOI)978-3-662-49321-2 (ISBN)978-3-662-49322-9 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-10-03 Created: 2017-10-03 Last updated: 2018-07-05Bibliographically approved
Ivarsson, A., Tranaeus, U., Johnson, U. & Stenling, A. (2017). Negative psychological responses of injury and rehabilitation adherence effects on return to play in competitive athletes: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Open Access Journal of Sports Medicine, 8, 27-32
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Negative psychological responses of injury and rehabilitation adherence effects on return to play in competitive athletes: a systematic review and meta-analysis
2017 (English)In: Open Access Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 1179-1543, E-ISSN 1179-1543, Vol. 8, p. 27-32Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Previous research offers evidence that psychological factors influence an injured athlete during the rehabilitation process. Our first objective was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of the results from all published studies that examined the relationships among negative affective responses after sport injuries, rehabilitation adherence, and return to play (RTP). The second objective was to use a meta-analytic path analysis to investigate whether an indirect effect existed between negative affective responses and RTP through rehabilitation adherence. This literature review resulted in seven studies providing 14 effect sizes. The results from the meta-analysis showed that negative affective responses had a negative effect on successful RTP, whereas rehabilitation adherence had a positive effect on RTP. The results from the meta-analytic path analysis showed a weak and nonsignificant indirect effect of negative affective responses on RTP via rehabilitation adherence. These results underline the importance of providing supportive environments for injured athletes to increase the chances of successful RTP via a decrease in negative affective responses and increase in rehabilitation adherence.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Macclesfield: Dove Medical Press Ltd. (Dovepress), 2017
Keywords
affective responses, rehabilitation behaviors, return to play, sport injuries
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-33546 (URN)10.2147/OAJSM.S112688 (DOI)000399936500002 ()
Available from: 2017-03-13 Created: 2017-03-13 Last updated: 2018-10-22Bibliographically approved
Ivarsson, A., Johnson, U., Andersen, M. B., Tranaeus, U., Stenling, A. & Lindwall, M. (2017). Psychosocial Factors and Sport Injuries: Meta-analyses for Prediction and Prevention. Sports Medicine, 47(2), 353-365
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Psychosocial Factors and Sport Injuries: Meta-analyses for Prediction and Prevention
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2017 (English)In: Sports Medicine, ISSN 0112-1642, E-ISSN 1179-2035, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 353-365Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Several studies have suggested that psy- chosocial variables can increase the risk of becoming injured during sport participation.

Objectives: The main objectives of these meta-analyses were to examine (i) the effect sizes of relationships between the psychosocial variables (suggested as injury predictors in the model of stress and athletic injury) and injury rates, and (ii) the effects of psychological interven- tions aimed at reducing injury occurrence (prevention).

Methods: Electronic databases as well as specific sport and exercise psychology journals were searched. The literature review resulted in 48 published studies containing 161 effect sizes for injury prediction and seven effect sizes for injury prevention.

Results: The results showed that stress responses (r = 0.27, 80 % CI [0.20, 0.33]) and history of stressors (r = 0.13, 80 % CI [0.11, 0.15]) had the strongest associations with injury rates. Also, the results from the path analysis showed that the stress response mediated the relationship between history of stressors and injury rates. For injury prevention studies, all studies included (N = 7) showed decreased injury rates in the treatment groups compared to control groups.

Conclusion: The results support the model’s suggestion that psychosocial variables, as well as psychologically, based interventions, can influence injury risk among athletes. © Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Auckland: Adis International Ltd., 2017
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-31630 (URN)10.1007/s40279-016-0578-x (DOI)000393332100011 ()27406221 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84978066615 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-07-13 Created: 2016-07-13 Last updated: 2018-07-05Bibliographically approved
Tranaeus, U., Götesson, E. & Werner, S. (2016). Injury Profile in Swedish Elite Floorball: A Prospective Cohort Study of 12 Teams. Sports Health: a multidisciplinary approach, 8(3), 224-229
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Injury Profile in Swedish Elite Floorball: A Prospective Cohort Study of 12 Teams
2016 (English)In: Sports Health: a multidisciplinary approach, ISSN 1941-7381, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 224-229Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Floorball is an indoor team sport with growing popularity worldwide characterized by rapid accelerations, decelerations, and cutting and pivoting movements. While injuries are common, there are few high-quality epidemiological investigations of floorball injuries. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the incidence and severity of injuries in male and female elite-level floorball players in Sweden.

HYPOTHESIS: The incidence of injuries has not decreased; female players are more vulnerable to injury than male players.

STUDY DESIGN: Prospective cohort study.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level 3.

METHODS: Twelve floorball teams (6 male, 6 female) in the Swedish premiere leagues were followed for 1 year (preseason, game season, and the entire year). The team medical staff reported injury incidence, location, type (traumatic or overuse), and severity. Differences between male and female players were analyzed using the Mann-Whitney U test.

RESULTS: The injury incidence was greater in female players during preseason (22.9 vs 7.4, P = 0.01), game season (39.5 vs 28.3, P = 0.002), as well as the whole year combined (33.9 vs 20.8, P = 0.02). The thigh was the most common injury location in male players and the ankle in female players. Overuse injuries were more common among men and were primarily back problems. Traumatic injuries were more common in women-mainly knee and ankle injuries. Most injuries were of mild severity. A greater number of anterior cruciate ligament injuries occurred in women (n = 11) than in men (n = 2).

CONCLUSION: The injury incidence was significantly greater in female floorball players throughout the entire floorball year. Male players sustained mostly overuse injuries while female players suffered traumatic injuries. The majority of injuries in floorball were mild, irrespective of player sex.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Knowledge of the incidence and severity of floorball injuries is an essential step in the sequence of injury prevention. Future research should focus on identifying injury mechanisms and risk factors for these injuries to develop injury prevention strategies.

 © 2016, 2016 The Author(s).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications, 2016
Keywords
epidemiology, floorball, overuse injury, sex, traumatic injury
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-35639 (URN)10.1177/1941738116628472 (DOI)000391283300003 ()26823181 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84964857275 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-11-30 Created: 2017-11-30 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Tranaeus, U., Johnson, U., Engström, B., Skillgate, E. & Werner, S. (2015). A psychological injury prevention group intervention in Swedish floorball. Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy, 23(11), 3414-3420
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A psychological injury prevention group intervention in Swedish floorball
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2015 (English)In: Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy, ISSN 0942-2056, E-ISSN 1433-7347, Vol. 23, no 11, p. 3414-3420Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose

The main purpose of the study was to evaluate a psychological skills training intervention at group level aiming to prevent injuries, separated in traumatic and overuse, in male and female elite floorball players.

Methods

Twenty-three teams in the premiere leagues for males and females were volunteered, and the teams were allocated to an intervention group (n = 11, males n = 94, females n = 99) and a control group (n = 12, males n = 109, females n = 99). The teams in the intervention group participated in a psychological skills training programme consisting of six meetings with each team. The control group received no substitute. All injuries were registered and documented according to the time-loss definition and classified into either traumatic or overuse.

Results

In total, 142 players (35 %) out of the 401 players sustained 197 injuries, 0.49 injury/player: in the intervention group 0.45 injury/player and in the control group 0.53 injury/player. The analyses revealed no significant differences in injuries between intervention groups and control groups. The effect size of the influence of the psychological skills training in overuse injuries was considered to be small, Cohen’s d 0.2.

Conclusions

This study comprised the whole team for a group intervention and did not screen for at-risk athletes, e.g. scoring high in anxiety or low in coping skills, which might have influenced the result. A psychological injury prevention intervention forward to a whole team might not influence the injury occurrence significantly. Thus, this psychological intervention decreased the injury incidence which is of clinical interest.

Level of incidence

Level II.

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Berlin: Springer, 2015
Keywords
Athletic injury, behaviour, psycho-education, sport, team
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-27256 (URN)10.1007/s00167-014-3133-z (DOI)000363258000039 ()24934929 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84945461359 (Scopus ID)
Note

Grants: Swedish National Centre for research in Sports, Swedish Naprapathic Association, Swedish Sports Confederation, Sophiahemmet Foundation.

Available from: 2014-12-15 Created: 2014-12-15 Last updated: 2018-07-05Bibliographically approved
Tranaeus, U., Ivarsson, A. & Johnson, U. (2015). Do psychological based intervention programs prevent sport injuries to occur?. In: Olivier Schmid, Roland Seiler, Annemarie Schumacher Dimech & André Klostermann (Ed.), Proceedings: 14th European Congress of Sport Psychology, 14-19 July 2015 in Bern, Switzerland. Paper presented at 14th European Congress of Sport Psychology, FEPSAC, Bern, Switzerland, 14-19 July, 2015 (pp. 174-174). Bern: University of Bern
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Do psychological based intervention programs prevent sport injuries to occur?
2015 (English)In: Proceedings: 14th European Congress of Sport Psychology, 14-19 July 2015 in Bern, Switzerland / [ed] Olivier Schmid, Roland Seiler, Annemarie Schumacher Dimech & André Klostermann, Bern: University of Bern , 2015, p. 174-174Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Bern: University of Bern, 2015
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-29995 (URN)978-3-033-05129-4 (ISBN)
Conference
14th European Congress of Sport Psychology, FEPSAC, Bern, Switzerland, 14-19 July, 2015
Available from: 2015-12-09 Created: 2015-12-09 Last updated: 2018-07-05Bibliographically approved
Tranaeus, U., Ivarsson, A. & Johnson, U. (2015). Evaluation of the effects of psychological prevention interventions on sport injuries: A meta-analysis. Science & sports, 30(6), 305-313
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluation of the effects of psychological prevention interventions on sport injuries: A meta-analysis
2015 (English)In: Science & sports, ISSN 0765-1597, E-ISSN 1778-4131, Vol. 30, no 6, p. 305-313Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives

The purpose was to conduct a systematic review of published articles aiming to prevent sports injuries based on psychological interventions and to perform a meta-analysis of the effects in such interventions.

News

Different kinds of sport injury prevention strategies have been accomplished such as neuromuscular and warm-up programs. More recently, psychological intervention studies have been completed with the purpose of preventing sports injuries. The most evident predictor is stress. Consequently, most psychological injury prevention interventions incorporate stress management and other psychological skills training.

Prospect and projects

The electronic databases and suitable sport psychology journals were searched for published studies. Out of 560 screened articles, 15 were potentially eligible articles. Seven of these articles, with substantial information in the papers or the authors were able to provide us with data after request, were finally included.

Conclusion

The result, using a random effect model, showed a total Hedges’ g effect size of 0.82 (< .001), 95% CI (0.55–1.11). The result indicates that psychological injury prevention interventions have a large effect on reducing the number of injuries in sport population. © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS.

Abstract [fr]

Objectif

Le but de notre recherche est de mener une revue systématique d’articles publiés ayant pour thématique la prévention des blessures sportives avec des interventions psychologiques et de conduire une méta-analyse des effets de ces interventions.

Informations

Différentes stratégies de prévention des blessures sportives ont été développées telles que des programmes neuromusculaires et des programmes d’échauffement. Plus récemment des études sur les interventions psychologiques ont été menées dans le but de prévenir les blessures sportives. Le prédicteur le plus évident est le stress. En conséquence, la plupart des interventions intègrent les stratégies de management du stress et l’entraînement d’autres habiletés psychologiques.

Perspectives et projets

Des bases de données électroniques et des revues spécialisées en psychologie du sport ont été consultées afin de recenser les études publiées. Parmi les 560 articles consultés, 15 études ont été potentiellement éligibles et 7 articles contenant suffisamment d’informations ou complétés par des données fournies par les auteurs ont été inclus.

Conclusion

Les résultats, en utilisant un modèle à effets aléatoires, montrent l’importance de l’effet Hedges de 0,82 (p < 0,001), IC à 95 % (0,55–1,11). Les résultats montrent que la prévention des blessures au niveau psychologique à un effet important dans la réduction des blessures sportives dans la population. © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Issy les Moulineaux: Elsevier, 2015
Keywords
Athletic injuries, Behavior, Education, Intervention studies, Blessures sportives, Comportement, Formation, Études d’interventions
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-28079 (URN)10.1016/j.scispo.2015.04.009 (DOI)000366957200001 ()2-s2.0-84942046657 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-04-10 Created: 2015-04-10 Last updated: 2018-07-05Bibliographically approved
Ivarsson, A., Johnson, U., Andersen, M. B. & Tranaeus, U. (2015). Psychosocial predictors of sport injury rates: A meta-analysis. In: Olivier Schmid & Roland Seiler (Ed.), Proceedings: 14th European Congress of Sport Psychology: Sport Psychology: Theories and Applications for Performance, Health and Humanity: 14-19 July 2015, Bern, Switzerland. Paper presented at 14th European Congress of Sport Psychology, FEPSAC 2015, Bern, Switzerland, July 14-19th, 2015 (pp. 173-174). Bern: University of Bern
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Psychosocial predictors of sport injury rates: A meta-analysis
2015 (English)In: Proceedings: 14th European Congress of Sport Psychology: Sport Psychology: Theories and Applications for Performance, Health and Humanity: 14-19 July 2015, Bern, Switzerland / [ed] Olivier Schmid & Roland Seiler, Bern: University of Bern , 2015, p. 173-174Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Sport injury prediction research has traditionally focused on physiological and physical factors. Nevertheless, during the last 30 years there has been increased interest in psychosocial factors related to sport injuries. The most cited theoretical model developed to explain psychosocial variables’ influences on injury risk is the model of stress and athletic injury (Williams & Andersen, 1998). The model, suggests that personality (e.g., anxiety, hardiness), history of stressors (e.g., life event stress, daily hassles), and coping (e.g., social support resources) will influence athletes’ stress responses (e.g., physiological, attentional changes) that, in turn, are related to injury risk. The aim of the study was to examine the past research on the relationships of the psychosocial variables in the model (i.e., personality, history of stressors, coping, stress responses) on sport injury rates. The literature review resulted in 47 published studies and 180 effect sizes. The results showed that stress responses (r = .22, 80% CI = .14 - .30) had the strongest associations with injury rates. Moreover, history of stressors (r = .12, 80% CI = .11 - .13) and coping (r = -.05, 80% CI = -.03 - -.08) had smaller relationships with injury rates. Finally, the associations of positive (r = .01, 80% CI = -.03 - .04), as well as negative (r = .01, 80% CI = -.01-.03) personality variables on injury rates was marginal. The results support the model’s suggestion that stress responses have a direct relationship with injury, whereas other variables potentially have indirect relationships with injury rates. In line with these findings it is suggested that intervention programs should focus on helping athletes decrease the magnitude of their stress responses. © 2015 University of Bern, Institut of Sport Science 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Bern: University of Bern, 2015
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-29512 (URN)978-3-033-05129-4 (ISBN)
Conference
14th European Congress of Sport Psychology, FEPSAC 2015, Bern, Switzerland, July 14-19th, 2015
Available from: 2015-09-24 Created: 2015-09-24 Last updated: 2018-07-05Bibliographically approved
Tranaeus, U., Johnson, U., Ivarsson, A., Engström, B., Skillgate, E. & Werner, S. (2015). Sports injury prevention in Swedish elite floorball players: evaluation of two consecutive floorball seasons. Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy, 23(3), 899-905
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sports injury prevention in Swedish elite floorball players: evaluation of two consecutive floorball seasons
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2015 (English)In: Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy, ISSN 0942-2056, E-ISSN 1433-7347, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 899-905Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose

The objective was to evaluate the effect of a psychological group-based injury prevention, which was implemented throughout the first season, after the second season, in Swedish elite floorball teams (males and females). The secondary objective was to evaluate the effect of the intervention over the two consecutive floorball seasons as a whole.

Methods

Twenty-three teams in the premier leagues for males and females volunteered and were allocated to an intervention group, n = 175 players, and a control group n = 171 players. The intervention group participated in psychological skills training during the first season. The control group did not receive any alternative treatment. Neither of the groups received any intervention during the second season. All injuries were registered and documented according to time-loss definition and classified into either traumatic or overuse injuries.

Results

Ninety-three players (27 %) sustained 119 injuries during the second season. The intervention group 0.31 (95 % CI 0.22–0.39) and the control group 0.41 (95 % CI 0.29–0.53) injuries/player. The injury incidence decreased in the intervention group and was lower than the control group. The analysis showed no statistical differences when comparing the intervention group and the control group neither after the second season nor after the two seasons together, Cohen’s d 0.2.

Conclusion

This group-based training showed a small effect size after the second year resulting in fewer injuries, especially severe injuries, in the intervention group compared to the control group. It is, therefore, important not to overlook the potential of a group-based psychological injury prevention programme.

Level of incidence: II.

© 2014, European Society of Sports Traumatology, Knee Surgery, Arthroscopy (ESSKA).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Heidelberg: Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2015
Keywords
athletic injury, behaviour, overuse injury, psycho-education, traumatic injury
National Category
Psychology Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-27252 (URN)10.1007/s00167-014-3411-9 (DOI)000350209300032 ()25362250 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84925491962 (Scopus ID)
Note

Grants to accomplish this study were provided from Sophiahemmet Foundation, the Swedish Naprapathic Association, and Swedish National Centre for research in Sports.

Available from: 2014-12-14 Created: 2014-12-14 Last updated: 2018-07-05Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-2102-6352

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