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Brodersen, M., Pink, S. & Fors, V. (2023). Automating the first and last mile? Reframing the ‘challenges’ of everyday mobilities. Mobilities
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Automating the first and last mile? Reframing the ‘challenges’ of everyday mobilities
2023 (English)In: Mobilities, ISSN 1745-0101, E-ISSN 1745-011XArticle in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

In this article, we interrogate the utility of conceptualising the ‘first and last mile’ (FLM) as a ‘challenge’ to be addressed through automated and integrated mobility services. We critically engage with the concept through a design anthropological approach which takes two steps so as: to complicate literatures that construct the FLM as a place where automated, service-based and micro-mobility innovations will engender sustainable modal choices above individual automobility; and to demonstrate how people’s situated mobility competencies and values, shape social and material realities and future imaginaries of everyday mobilities. To do so, we draw on ethnographic research into everyday mobility practices, meanings and imaginaries in a suburban neighbourhood in Sweden. We show how locally situated mobilities both challenge the spatial and temporal underpinnings of the first and last mile concept, and resist universalist technology-driven automation narratives. We argue that instead of attempting to bridge gaps in seemingly linear journeys through automated systems, there is a need to account for the practices, tensions and desires embedded in everyday mobilities. © 2023 The Author(s).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Abingdon: Routledge, 2023
Keywords
First and last mile transportation, everyday mobilities, sustainable mobility, situated mobility, design ethnography
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Research subject
Smart Cities and Communities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-50612 (URN)10.1080/17450101.2023.2218595 (DOI)001004404800001 ()2-s2.0-85161702490 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Vinnova, 2019-04786
Available from: 2023-06-09 Created: 2023-06-09 Last updated: 2023-07-05Bibliographically approved
Ebbesson, E. & Fors, V. (2023). Retaining ways of co-creation. In: ECIS 2023 Research Papers: ECIS 2023, European Conference of Information Systems, Kristianstand, Norway. Paper presented at The 31st European Conference on Information Systems (ECIS), ECIS 2023, Co-creating Sustainable Digital Futures, Kristiansand, Norway, June 11-16, 2023.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Retaining ways of co-creation
2023 (English)In: ECIS 2023 Research Papers: ECIS 2023, European Conference of Information Systems, Kristianstand, Norway, 2023Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The design space of future mobility services is considered a wicked problem, as many stakeholders from the public and private sectors need to collaborate to create sustainable future services. Recent years have shown a growing interest in utilizing urban living labs (ULL) and similar quadruple helix approaches toward addressing wicked design challenges. However, when engaging in co-creation through living labs, many actors also see potential in adapting methodology and new ways-of-doing, to appropriate it and improve readiness for tackling other wicked challenges. The article draws upon a ULL initiative in the mobility service context to explore the main challenges for ULL partners to retain the ways-of-doing that develops in co-creation activities. Through our study, we identified that cocreation needs to be grounded in the known, to facilitate search and co-appropriation of the unknown as key for retaining ways-of-doing in ULL initiatives.

Series
European Conference on Information Systems (ECIS)
Keywords
Co-Creation, Future Mobility, Multistakeholder, Futurizing
National Category
Other Social Sciences
Research subject
Smart Cities and Communities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-51088 (URN)
Conference
The 31st European Conference on Information Systems (ECIS), ECIS 2023, Co-creating Sustainable Digital Futures, Kristiansand, Norway, June 11-16, 2023
Funder
Vinnova, 2019-04786
Available from: 2023-06-27 Created: 2023-06-27 Last updated: 2023-07-26Bibliographically approved
Raats, K., Fors, V. & Ebbesson, E. (2023). Tailoring Co-creation for Responsible Innovation: A Design Ethnographic Approach. In: Esko Penttinen; Sampsa Suvivuo; Virpi Kristiina Tuunainen; Matti Rossi; Hadi Ghanbari (Ed.), 14th Scandinavian Conference On Information Systems: The proceedings of the 14th Scandinavian Conference on Information Systems (SCIS) held in Porvoo, Finland, 2023. Paper presented at Fourteenth Scandinavian Conference on Information Systems (SCIS2023), Porvoo, Finland, August 13-16 Augusti, 2023 . , Article ID 15.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Tailoring Co-creation for Responsible Innovation: A Design Ethnographic Approach
2023 (English)In: 14th Scandinavian Conference On Information Systems: The proceedings of the 14th Scandinavian Conference on Information Systems (SCIS) held in Porvoo, Finland, 2023 / [ed] Esko Penttinen; Sampsa Suvivuo; Virpi Kristiina Tuunainen; Matti Rossi; Hadi Ghanbari, 2023, article id 15Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

It is hard to predict the impact of technology on society before it is developed enough. For example, the issue can be attributed to the need for more cross-sectoral collaboration in the design process. However, a solution for anticipating such outcomes has been proposed through the quadruple helix innovation model, which states that the involvement of government, academia, industry, and the public is essential in innovation systems. The question of how this collaboration can successfully be staged to foresee possible impacts is an empirical endeavour. This paper presents an iterative case study of how ethnographic material can be used to ongoingly tailor speculative co-creation to facilitate responsible innovation (RI) principles. The result is reflected through two lenses; the tools developed in the project to facilitate co-creation activities and the stakeholder reflections evoked through these tools.

Keywords
tailoring, co-creation, responsible innovation, design ethnography, speculative design
National Category
Economics and Business
Research subject
Smart Cities and Communities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-51455 (URN)978-952-64-9639-9 (ISBN)
Conference
Fourteenth Scandinavian Conference on Information Systems (SCIS2023), Porvoo, Finland, August 13-16 Augusti, 2023 
Funder
Vinnova, 2018-02088
Available from: 2023-08-17 Created: 2023-08-17 Last updated: 2023-12-06Bibliographically approved
Lindgren, T., Fors, V., Andersson, J. & Yuan, L. (2023). What does it take to make electric charging 'smart'?. In: Esko Penttinen; Sampsa Suvivuo; Virpi Kristiina Tuunainen; Matti Rossi; Hadi Ghanbari (Ed.), 14th Scandinavian Conference on Information Systems: . Paper presented at Fourteenth Scandinavian Conference on Information Systems (SCIS2023), Porvoo, Finland, August 13-16, 2023. , Article ID 8.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What does it take to make electric charging 'smart'?
2023 (English)In: 14th Scandinavian Conference on Information Systems / [ed] Esko Penttinen; Sampsa Suvivuo; Virpi Kristiina Tuunainen; Matti Rossi; Hadi Ghanbari, 2023, article id 8Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In this paper, we argue that the electrification of cars is not simply a move from fossil fuel to electric energy. It also integrates the car into the household energy system in ways that challenge assumptions that car charging is made ‘smart’ primarily through AI-powered app-based digital services that help the user to make energy-, and cost-efficient decisions in terms of when to charge the car. As we will demonstrate in this paper, our design ethnographic study of how nine households learn to charge their cars according to their family routines and values shows how smart charging is not merely due to specific technological features. Instead, charging habits evolve through anticipatory experiences of what smart technologies come to mean to family members through their use. Based on our research, we recommend a smart charging service design that affords multi-operation ability, co-learning ability and social accessibility.

Keywords
Smart charging, Smart technologies, User experience, Design ethnography, Electric vehicles
National Category
Energy Systems
Research subject
Smart Cities and Communities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-51456 (URN)978-952-64-9639-9 (ISBN)
Conference
Fourteenth Scandinavian Conference on Information Systems (SCIS2023), Porvoo, Finland, August 13-16, 2023
Funder
Vinnova, 2019-03065
Available from: 2023-08-17 Created: 2023-08-17 Last updated: 2023-12-06Bibliographically approved
Pink, S., Raats, K., Lindgren, T., Osz, K. & Fors, V. (2022). An Interventional Design Anthropology of Emerging Technologies: Working Through an Interdisciplinary Field. In: Maja Hojer Bruun, Ayo Wahlberg, Rachel Douglas-Jones, Cathrine Hasse, Klaus Hoeyer, Dorthe Brogård Kristensen, Brit Ross Winthereik (Ed.), The Palgrave Handbook of the Anthropology of Technology: (pp. 183-200). Singapore: Palgrave Macmillan
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An Interventional Design Anthropology of Emerging Technologies: Working Through an Interdisciplinary Field
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2022 (English)In: The Palgrave Handbook of the Anthropology of Technology / [ed] Maja Hojer Bruun, Ayo Wahlberg, Rachel Douglas-Jones, Cathrine Hasse, Klaus Hoeyer, Dorthe Brogård Kristensen, Brit Ross Winthereik, Singapore: Palgrave Macmillan, 2022, p. 183-200Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Emerging technologies—such as autonomous driving (AD) cars, blockchain, robotics, and drones—are increasingly part of popular narratives and industry and policy agendas. They are commonly understood as new digital, data-driven, intelligent, or automated technological innovations in development, or at the cusp of being launched into a market. Thus, the anthropological question of how they might become part of everyday, experiential, possible worlds demands our attention. In this chapter we outline an approach to emerging technologies that is rooted in design anthropology and takes an interventional stance. In doing so we situated design anthropology of emerging technologies within an interdisciplinary field which has tended to be dominated by technologically determinist approaches. Through the example of the notion of trust in AD cars, we show how policy, industry, engineering, and social science approaches configure to provide different and critical understandings. Drawing on our own design ethnographic research, we show how design anthropological attention to people offers an alternative and viable mode of understanding how emerging technologies become part of emerging worlds. © 2022 The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Singapore: Palgrave Macmillan, 2022
Keywords
Autonomous driving cars, Design anthropology, Emerging technologies, Innovation, Trust
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Research subject
Smart Cities and Communities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-46519 (URN)10.1007/978-981-16-7084-8_9 (DOI)2-s2.0-85160482433 (Scopus ID)978-981-16-7083-1 (ISBN)978-981-16-7084-8 (ISBN)
Available from: 2022-03-25 Created: 2022-03-25 Last updated: 2023-11-10Bibliographically approved
Pink, S., Fors, V., Lanzeni, D., Duque, M., Sumartojo, S. & Strengers, Y. (2022). Design Ethnography: Research, Responsibilities, and Futures. Abingdon: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Design Ethnography: Research, Responsibilities, and Futures
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2022 (English)Book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This book roots the bringing together of ethnography and design firmly in social science theory, showing readers how to best use theory in design ethnography and how to develop a coherent relationship between research and practice. It promotes interdisciplinarity and collaboration, and takes design ethnography beyond the content of the 'project' to ask how it contributes to a wider agenda for a better world and the creation of ethical and responsible futures.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Abingdon: Routledge, 2022. p. 236
Keywords
Design ethnography, Research methodology, futures, responsibilities
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Research subject
Smart Cities and Communities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-48241 (URN)9780367539047 (ISBN)
Available from: 2022-10-03 Created: 2022-10-03 Last updated: 2022-10-06Bibliographically approved
Lindgren, T., Fors, V. & Pink, S. (2022). Entangled Intelligent Driving: Relations with Automated Cars. International Journal of Human-Computer Interaction, 38(17), 1607-1620
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Entangled Intelligent Driving: Relations with Automated Cars
2022 (English)In: International Journal of Human-Computer Interaction, ISSN 1044-7318, E-ISSN 1532-7590, Vol. 38, no 17, p. 1607-1620Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

As machines become increasingly intelligent, the HCI community is presented with new challenges regarding methods to capture and understand user experience (UX). In the case of autonomous driving (AD), this involves new scenarios where humans and intelligent vehicles need to act together in real-life traffic situations with other road users. This article responds to this context by 1) outlining a longitudinal design ethnography method whereby participants drove semiautonomous cars in their everyday environments to capture such human-machine relations in real-life settings, 2) demonstrating the complexities of the relations between humans and AD vehicles, 3) engaging theories of socio-materiality and entanglement to understand the human-machine relations of AD cars, and 4) identifying anticipatory experiences that emerge from these relations and their implications for informing UX design. © 2021 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York, NY: Taylor & Francis, 2022
Keywords
Computer Science Applications, Human-Computer Interaction, Human Factors and Ergonomics
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-46114 (URN)10.1080/10447318.2021.2009670 (DOI)000729330600001 ()2-s2.0-85121529265 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-12-14 Created: 2021-12-14 Last updated: 2022-10-24Bibliographically approved
Pink, S., Fors, V., Osz, K., Lutz, P. & Smith, R. C. (2022). Future Mobility Solutions?. In: D. Lanzeni; K. Waltrop; S. Pink; R.C. Smith (Ed.), An Anthropology of Futures and Technologies: (pp. 138-154). Oxford: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Future Mobility Solutions?
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2022 (English)In: An Anthropology of Futures and Technologies / [ed] D. Lanzeni; K. Waltrop; S. Pink; R.C. Smith, Oxford: Routledge, 2022, p. 138-154Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This chapter outlines and demonstrates a collaborative and interventional design anthropology of emerging technologies, through the example of autonomous driving (AD) cars. AD cars have been framed as solutions to everyday problems within proposals for platform-based future automated mobility systems. However when reframed through the lens of everyday local mobilities these industry driven future visions are revealed to be misaligned with the real priorities of people’s everyday lives. Thus showing how  revealing how the everyday present complicates dominant futures narratives. However, we emphasise that rather than stopping at this critique, we should productively collaboratively engage with city and automotive stakeholders in this field in pedagogies of mutual learning, experimentation, and creativity. To develop our discussion we draw on ongoing conceptualisation and research undertaken over a period of over six years.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford: Routledge, 2022
Keywords
Autonomous driving cars, Design anthropology, Emerging technologies, Future mobility
National Category
Social Anthropology
Research subject
Smart Cities and Communities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-49161 (URN)9781350144910 (ISBN)9781003084471 (ISBN)
Funder
Vinnova
Available from: 2023-01-10 Created: 2023-01-10 Last updated: 2023-02-27Bibliographically approved
Fors, V., Brodersen, M., Raats, K., Pink, S. & Smith, R. C. (2022). Investigating ADM in Shared Mobility: A design ethnographic approach (1ed.). In: Sarah Pink; Martin Berg; Deborah Lupton; Minna Ruckenstein (Ed.), Everyday Automation: Experiencing and Anticipating Emerging Technologies (pp. 197-212). London: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Investigating ADM in Shared Mobility: A design ethnographic approach
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2022 (English)In: Everyday Automation: Experiencing and Anticipating Emerging Technologies / [ed] Sarah Pink; Martin Berg; Deborah Lupton; Minna Ruckenstein, London: Routledge, 2022, 1, p. 197-212Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In this chapter, we demonstrate how a design ethnographic approach to future algorithm-powered mobility solutions opens up possibilities to research social implications of automated decision making (ADM) from a situational perspective, by investigating the context of ADM rather than simply observing the technology itself and how it is used. The context of our discussion is one where the development of autonomous vehicles and artificial intelligence (AI) applications, in the service of transportation, has sparked a renewed research interest into shared mobility systems, and how these can respond to emerging challenges of rising traffic congestion and pollution levels. Our research addresses the gap between algorithm-based approaches to designing for optimizing, streamlining, and efficiency, the questions of how these systems and services are activated in people’s everyday life, and how they interfere with decision-making around traveling and shared mobility. We argue that to understand how these services and technologies will be adopted and implemented in society, research attention must be directed to people in real-life situations where this type of ADM operates.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Routledge, 2022 Edition: 1
Keywords
automation, design ethnography, shared mobiliy
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Research subject
Smart Cities and Communities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-46580 (URN)10.4324/9781003170884-17 (DOI)2-s2.0-85140566742 (Scopus ID)978-0-367-77340-3 (ISBN)978-0-367-77338-0 (ISBN)978-1-003-17088-4 (ISBN)
Projects
Design Ethnographic Living Labs for Future Urban Mobility – A Human Approach (AHA II)
Funder
Vinnova
Note

OA Funder: Malmö University Data Society

Available from: 2022-04-04 Created: 2022-04-04 Last updated: 2024-01-23Bibliographically approved
Nowaczyk, S., Resmini, A., Long, V., Fors, V., Cooney, M., Duarte, E. K., . . . Dougherty, M. (2022). Smaller is smarter: A case for small to medium-sized smart cities. Journal of Smart Cities and Society, 1(2), 95-117
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Smaller is smarter: A case for small to medium-sized smart cities
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2022 (English)In: Journal of Smart Cities and Society, ISSN 2772-3577, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 95-117Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Smart Cities have been around as a concept for quite some time. However, most examples of Smart Cities (SCs) originate from megacities (MCs), despite the fact that most people live in Small and Medium-sized Cities (SMCs). This paper addresses the contextual setting for smart cities from the perspective of such small and medium-sized cities. It starts with an overview of the current trends in the research and development of SCs, highlighting the current bias and the challenges it brings. We follow with a few concrete examples of projects which introduced some form of “smartness” in the small and medium cities context, explaining what influence said context had and what specific effects did it lead to. Building on those experiences, we summarise the current understanding of Smart Cities, with a focus on its multi-faceted (e.g., smart economy, smart people, smart governance, smart mobility, smart environment and smart living) nature; we describe mainstream publications and highlight the bias towards large and very large cities (sometimes even subconscious); give examples of (often implicit) assumptions deriving from this bias; finally, we define the need of contextualising SCs also for small and medium-sized cities. The aim of this paper is to establish and strengthen the discourse on the need for SMCs perspective in Smart Cities literature. We hope to provide an initial formulation of the problem, mainly focusing on the unique needs and the specific requirements. We expect that the three example cases describing the effects of applying new solutions and studying SC on small and medium-sized cities, together with the lessons learnt from these experiences, will encourage more research to consider SMCs perspective. To this end, the current paper aims to justify the need for this under-studied perspective, as well as to propose interesting challenges faced by SMCs that can serve as initial directions of such research.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Amsterdam: IOS Press, 2022
Keywords
Smart cities, small- and medium-sized cities
National Category
Information Systems, Social aspects
Research subject
Smart Cities and Communities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-47260 (URN)10.3233/scs-210116 (DOI)
Funder
VinnovaKnowledge Foundation
Available from: 2022-06-21 Created: 2022-06-21 Last updated: 2022-09-06Bibliographically approved
Projects
Sensing, shaping, sharing: Imagining the body in a mediatized world [P14-0367:1_RJ]; Halmstad University; Publications
Fors, V., Pink, S., Berg, M. & O'Dell, T. (2019). Imagining Personal Data: Experiences of Self-Tracking (1ed.). London, UK: Bloomsbury Academic
Co-designing future smart urban mobility services - A Human Approach (AHA) [2018-02088_Vinnova]; Halmstad University; Publications
Raats, K. (2023). Towards trustworthy intelligent vehicle technology development. (Doctoral dissertation). Halmstad: Halmstad University PressPink, S., Smith, R. C., Fors, V., Lund, J., Raats, K., Osz, K., . . . Broström, R. (2021). Mobility as a Service Through Design: A Human Approach (1ed.). In: S. Coxon; R. Napper (Ed.), Advancing a Design Approach to Enriching Public Mobility: (pp. 1-17). Cham: Springer Publishing Company
Design Ethnographic Living Labs for Future Urban Mobility - A Human Approach [2019-04786_Vinnova]; Halmstad University; Publications
Raats, K. (2024). Advancing Human-Centred Algorithm Design Through Reflective Practice. In: Proceedings of the 57th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences: . Paper presented at Hawaii International Conference of System Sciences (HICSS), Hawaiian Village, Waikiki, Hawaii, USA, 3-6 Jan, 2024. Raats, K. (2024). Algorithm developers’ strategies for human-centredness when developing algorithms for autonomous vehicles: the role of organisational context. In: : . Paper presented at European Conference on Information Systems (ECIS 2024), Paphos, Cyprus, 13-19 June, 2024. Brodersen, M., Pink, S. & Fors, V. (2023). Automating the first and last mile? Reframing the ‘challenges’ of everyday mobilities. MobilitiesEbbesson, E. & Fors, V. (2023). Retaining ways of co-creation. In: ECIS 2023 Research Papers: ECIS 2023, European Conference of Information Systems, Kristianstand, Norway. Paper presented at The 31st European Conference on Information Systems (ECIS), ECIS 2023, Co-creating Sustainable Digital Futures, Kristiansand, Norway, June 11-16, 2023. Raats, K. (2023). Towards trustworthy intelligent vehicle technology development. (Doctoral dissertation). Halmstad: Halmstad University PressEbbesson, E., Lund, J. & Smith, R. C. Dynamics of Sustained Co-Design in Urban Living Labs.
GREEN-LOG - Cooperative and Interconnected Green delivery solutions towards an era of optimized zero emission last-mile Logistics; SPINE - Smart Public transport Initiatives for climate-Neutral cities in Europe
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-1870-683X

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