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Lindgren, T., Bergquist, M., Pink, S., Berg, M. & Fors, V. (2018). Experiencing Expectations: Extending the Concept of UX Anticipation. In: Sune Dueholm Müller & Jeppe Agger Nielsen (Ed.), Nordic Contributions in IS Research: 9th Scandinavian Conference on Information Systems, SCIS 2018, Odder, Denmark, August 5–8, 2018, Proceedings. Paper presented at 9th Scandinavian Conference on Information Systems, SCIS 2018, Odder, Denmark, August 5–8, 2018 (pp. 1-13). Cham: Springer, 326
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Experiencing Expectations: Extending the Concept of UX Anticipation
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2018 (English)In: Nordic Contributions in IS Research: 9th Scandinavian Conference on Information Systems, SCIS 2018, Odder, Denmark, August 5–8, 2018, Proceedings / [ed] Sune Dueholm Müller & Jeppe Agger Nielsen, Cham: Springer, 2018, Vol. 326, p. 1-13Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper demonstrates the role of pre-product user experience (UX) in product design. For automotive companies, questions concerning how users will experience not yet available products is pressing - due to an increase in UX design for products, combined with a decrease in time-to-market for new products. Conventional UX research provides insights through investigating specific situated moments during use, or users’ reflections after use, yet cannot provide knowledge about how users will engage with not yet existing products. To understand pre-product UX we undertook a netnographic study of three people’s experiences of expecting and owning a Tesla car. We identified how modes of anticipation evolve before using the actual car, through online social interaction, creating a pre-product experience. The study offers a foundation for theorizing pre-product UX as socially generated anticipated UX, as well as insights for UX design in industry. © Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cham: Springer, 2018
Series
Lecture Notes in Business Information Processing, ISSN 1865-1348, E-ISSN 1865-1356 ; 326
Keywords
User Experience, Expectations, Automotive, Anticipation
National Category
Other Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-37964 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-96367-9_1 (DOI)2-s2.0-85050003591 (Scopus ID)978-3-319-96366-2 (ISBN)978-3-319-96367-9 (ISBN)
Conference
9th Scandinavian Conference on Information Systems, SCIS 2018, Odder, Denmark, August 5–8, 2018
Projects
Human Experiences and Expectations of Autonomous Driving (HEAD)
Funder
VINNOVA, 2016-02515
Available from: 2018-09-13 Created: 2018-09-13 Last updated: 2018-09-13Bibliographically approved
Lindgren, T., Fors, V., Pink, S., Bergquist, M. & Berg, M. (2018). On the way to anticipated car UX. In: NordiCHI'18: Proceedings of the 10th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction. Paper presented at NordiCHI'18, 29 sept -3 Okt, 2018, Oslo, Norge (pp. 494-504). New York: ACM Publications
Open this publication in new window or tab >>On the way to anticipated car UX
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2018 (English)In: NordiCHI'18: Proceedings of the 10th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, New York: ACM Publications, 2018, p. 494-504Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Traditional User Experience (UX) research provides insights into situated uses of products, or reflections after their use, but tells us little about how products are experienced before use. In this article we demonstrate how people's engagement in web-based discussion forums creates ways through which they can experience products before they have actually used them, and reflect on the implications of this for UX research. To understand how product anticipation emerges in a digital-material setting we undertook an ethnographic analysis of members' contributions to http://www.teslaclubsweden.se, a web-based discussion forum that connects Tesla car enthusiasts. Anticipation developed as a shared endeavour that evolved through five ways which forum members engaged and participated in their community of practice. Through their online interactions their UX evolved before using the actual car. Our findings provide deeper understandings of anticipatory UX, and insights for UX design in HCI. © 2018 Association for Computing Machinery

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: ACM Publications, 2018
Keywords
Anticipation, netnography, autonmous driving
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-38285 (URN)10.1145/3240167.3240219 (DOI)978-1-4503-6437-9 (ISBN)
Conference
NordiCHI'18, 29 sept -3 Okt, 2018, Oslo, Norge
Projects
Human expectations and experiences of Autonomus Driving
Funder
VINNOVA, 2016-02515
Available from: 2018-11-08 Created: 2018-11-08 Last updated: 2018-11-09Bibliographically approved
Fors, V. & Berg, M. (2018). Samproduktionens pedagogik. In: Martin berg, Vaike Fors, Robert Willim (Ed.), Samverkansformer: Nya vägar för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap. Lund: Studentlitteratur AB
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Samproduktionens pedagogik
2018 (Swedish)In: Samverkansformer: Nya vägar för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap / [ed] Martin berg, Vaike Fors, Robert Willim, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2018Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2018
Keywords
Samproduktion, Mötesmetodik, pedagogik
National Category
Humanities and the Arts Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-38286 (URN)978-91-44-12138-3 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-11-08 Created: 2018-11-08 Last updated: 2018-11-08
Berg, M., Fors, V. & Willim, R. (2018). Samverkansformer: Nya vägar för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (8ed.). Lund: Studentlitteratur AB
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Samverkansformer: Nya vägar för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap
2018 (Swedish)Book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2018. p. 244 Edition: 8
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-36616 (URN)978-91-44-12138-3 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-04-16 Created: 2018-04-16 Last updated: 2018-05-29Bibliographically approved
Pink, S., Fors, V. & Glöss, M. (2018). The contingent futures of the mobile present: automation as possibility. Mobilities, 13(5), 615-631
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The contingent futures of the mobile present: automation as possibility
2018 (English)In: Mobilities, ISSN 1745-0101, E-ISSN 1745-011X, Vol. 13, no 5, p. 615-631Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this article we outline and demonstrate a design anthropological approach to investigating automated mobile futures as a processual opening up of possibilities, rather than as a process of technological innovation. To undertake this we investigate the example of how the car-smartphone relationship is configuring in the contingent circumstances of the mobile present and the implications of this for automated mobile futures. Our discussion is set in the context of the growing possibility that automonous driving (AD) features are increasingly part of everyday mobilities (even if unequally distributed globally) and in which personal mobile smart technologies and artificial intelligence (AI) will exist in some form and will interface with humans and be interoperable with other technologies. In developing this we draw on ethnographic understandings of how people live with the possibilities afforded by technologies in everyday life. © 2018 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Abingdon: Routledge, 2018
Keywords
Design anthropology, automation, mobile futures, autonomous driving cars, smartphones
National Category
Other Humanities Other Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-36438 (URN)10.1080/17450101.2018.1436672 (DOI)2-s2.0-85043684335 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Human Experiences and Expectations of Autonomous driving (HEAD)
Funder
VINNOVA, 2016-02515
Available from: 2018-03-14 Created: 2018-03-14 Last updated: 2018-10-12Bibliographically approved
Pink, S., Fors, V. & Glöss, M. (2017). Automated futures and the mobile present: In-car video ethnographies. Ethnography
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Automated futures and the mobile present: In-car video ethnographies
2017 (English)In: Ethnography, ISSN 1466-1381, E-ISSN 1741-2714Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

New technological possibilities associated with autonomous driving (AD) cars are generating new questions and imaginaries about automated futures. In this article we advance a theoretical-methodological approach towards researching this context based in design anthropological theory and sensory ethnographic practice. In doing so we explain and discuss the findings of an in-car video ethnography study designed to investigate the usually unspoken and not necessarily visible elements of car-based mobility. Such an approach is needed, we argue, both in order to inform a research agenda that is capable of addressing the emergence of automated vehicles specifically, as well as in preparation for understanding the implications of automation more generally as human mobility is increasingly entangled with automated technologies and the future imaginaries associated with them.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Sage Publications, 2017
Keywords
video ethnography, design ethnography, automotive ethnography, automotive mobilities, autonomous driving (AD) cars, driving
National Category
Human Aspects of ICT
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-35296 (URN)10.1177/1466138117735621 (DOI)
Projects
Human Experiences and Expectations of Autonomous Driving
Funder
VINNOVA, 2016-02515
Available from: 2017-10-30 Created: 2017-10-30 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Pink, S. & Fors, V. (2017). Being in a mediated world: self-tracking and the mind–body–environment. Cultural Geographies, 24(3), 375-388
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Being in a mediated world: self-tracking and the mind–body–environment
2017 (English)In: Cultural Geographies, ISSN 1474-4740, E-ISSN 1477-0881, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 375-388Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Self-tracking is an increasingly ubiquitous everyday activity and therefore is becoming implicated in the ways that everyday environments are experienced and configured. In this article, we examine theoretically and ethnographically how the digital materiality of these technologies mediates and participates in the constitution of people’s tacit ways of being in the world. We argue that accounting for the presence of such technologies as part of everyday environments in this way offers new insights for non-representational accounts of everyday life as developed in geography and anthropology and advances existing understandings of these technologies as it has emerged in sociology and media studies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Sage Publications, 2017
Keywords
digital materiality, everyday life, lived experience, perception of the environment, self-tracking
National Category
Ethnology Human Aspects of ICT
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-33049 (URN)10.1177/1474474016684127 (DOI)000405432600002 ()2-s2.0-85021067647 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Sensing, Shaping, Sharing
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, P14-0367:1
Available from: 2017-01-13 Created: 2017-01-13 Last updated: 2018-03-23Bibliographically approved
Pink, S. & Fors, V. (2017). Ethnography, Stakeholders, and Audiences: Toward Openness and Inclusivity. Sociological research online, 22(4), 169-173
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ethnography, Stakeholders, and Audiences: Toward Openness and Inclusivity
2017 (English)In: Sociological research online, ISSN 1360-7804, E-ISSN 1360-7804, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 169-173Article in journal, Editorial material (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The environments in which ethnography is currently being played out are in many ways shifting as part of a world where academic research is increasingly implicated in applied and public scholarship and practice. This calls not simply for new ways of applying ethnographic insights to societal, industry, and policy problems but, we argue, for a reconfiguration of how we understand the possibilities, potentials, and impacts of ethnographic practice when situated as part of a world in progress. It invites us to revise how we understand ethnographic processes, practices, and ethics as they are played out with and through different sets of stakeholders, beyond researchers, participants, and the academic communities of critics (Strathern, 2006) who were their traditional audiences. This new context, we argue, takes us beyond past iterations of applied ethnography because there is a more widespread and institutionally driven aim to seek to do ethnographic work that has impact and may intervene in the world. This new institutionally endorsed and indeed encouraged way of practicing as an ethnographer and scholar brings new configurations and considerations to our profession. It makes partnering with industry or with creative practitioners unsurprising, yet at the same time potentially challenging. This Special Section represents our interest in exploring how this new and emerging context might be conceptualized and how it might be played out through responsible and ethical ways of conducting ethnographic research and forms of intervention in contemporary worlds. © The Author(s) 2017

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Sage Publications, 2017
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-36703 (URN)10.1177/1360780417746029 (DOI)000426273900009 ()
Available from: 2018-04-27 Created: 2018-04-27 Last updated: 2018-04-30
Pink, S., O'Dell, T. & Fors, V. (2017). Introduction: Theoretical Scholarship and Applied Practice: Opportunities and Challenges of Working in the In-between. In: Sarah Pink, Vaike Fors & Tom O'Dell (Ed.), Theoretical Scholarship and Applied Practice: (pp. 3-28). New York: Berghahn Books
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Introduction: Theoretical Scholarship and Applied Practice: Opportunities and Challenges of Working in the In-between
2017 (English)In: Theoretical Scholarship and Applied Practice / [ed] Sarah Pink, Vaike Fors & Tom O'Dell, New York: Berghahn Books, 2017, p. 3-28Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Berghahn Books, 2017
Series
Studies in Public and Applied Anthropology ; 11
Keywords
Applied Anthropology
National Category
Social Anthropology Ethnology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-33047 (URN)978-1-78533-416-0 (ISBN)978-1-78533-417-7 (ISBN)
Projects
SCACA
Available from: 2017-01-13 Created: 2017-01-13 Last updated: 2018-03-23Bibliographically approved
Fors, V. & Pink, S. (2017). Pedagogy as Possibility: Health Interventions as Digital Openness. Social Sciences - Socialiniai, 6(2)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pedagogy as Possibility: Health Interventions as Digital Openness
2017 (English)In: Social Sciences - Socialiniai, ISSN 1392-0758, E-ISSN 2029-7319, Vol. 6, no 2Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this article we propose an approach to digital health tracking technologies that draws on design anthropology. This entails re-thinking the pedagogical importance of personal data as lying in how they participate in the constitution of new possibilities that enable people to learn about, and configure, their everyday health in new ways. There have been two dominant strands in traditional debates in the field of pedagogy: one that refers to processes of teaching people to do things in particular ways; and another that seeks to enable learning. The first of these corresponds with existing understandings of self-tracking technologies as either unsuccessful behavioural change devices, or as providing solutions to problems that do not necessarily exist. When seen as such, self-tracking technologies inevitably fail as forms of intervention towards better health. In this article we investigate what happens when we take the second strand—the notion of enabling learning as an incremental and emergent process—seriously as a mode of intervention towards health through self-tracking technologies. We show how such a shift in pedagogical understanding of the routes to knowing these technologies offer creates opportunities to move beyond simplistic ideas of behavioural change as the main application of digital body monitoring in everyday life. In what follows, we first demonstrate how the disjunctures that arise from this context emerge. We then outline a critical response to how learning through life-tracking has been conceptualised in research in health and human-computer interaction research. We offer an alternative response by drawing on a processual theory of learning and recent and emerging research in sociology, media studies, anthropology, and cognate disciplines. Then, drawing on ethnographic research, we argue for understanding learning through the production of personal data as involving emplaced and non-representational routes to knowing. This, we propose, requires a corresponding rethinking of the epistemological status of personal data and what kind of knowledge it can be claimed to produce. Finally, we take up the implications of this and advance the discussion through a design anthropological approach, through which we refigure the interventional potential of such technologies as lying in their capacity to create possibilities for experiential, and often unspoken, ways of embodied and emplaced knowing.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Kaunas: Kaunas University of Technology, 2017
Keywords
pedagogy, design ethnography, health technology, embodied learning, data epistemology
National Category
Pedagogy Cultural Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-33988 (URN)10.3390/socsci6020059 (DOI)2-s2.0-85021172472 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Sensing, shaping, sharing: Imagining the body in a mediatized world
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, P14-0367:1
Available from: 2017-06-06 Created: 2017-06-06 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-1870-683X

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