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Awuah, Gabriel BaffourORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-0554-9591
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Publications (10 of 53) Show all publications
Andersson, S., Aagerup, U., Awuah, G. B. & Wictor, I. (2018). Building Brand Personality in a Business-to-Business Context – the Case of Born Globals. In: : . Paper presented at The 22nd McGill International Entrepreneurship Conference, 22-24 September, 2018, Halmstad, Sweden.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Building Brand Personality in a Business-to-Business Context – the Case of Born Globals
2018 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Branding has for a long time been in focus in strategic decision making for firms in a business-to-consumer context. Brands has been used as a tool to differentiate products and position firms’ offers towards competitors. In a business-to business context branding has not been in focus in the same way. Strategic decisions have more dealt with technology innovation and market expansions. In recent times, a greater interest for brand building in a business to business (B2B) context has emerged, both in practice and academia, especially for globally active B2B firms that strive to create a unified look of their products and firms. The hard global competition has made it difficult to compete on product quality alone, services around the product and intangible features has been important parts of B2B firms’ offers. The B2B firms’ more complex offers can be incorporated under a common brand that differentiates the firms’ offer from competitors. Although that the practical importance of B2B branding has been acknowledge lately, research dealing with B2B branding is still relatively limited. Most studies on B2B branding attempt to describe what brands are, how they affect companies, or vice versa. Research on the process of B2B brand building is however scarce. Also, when B2B brands are in focus of a study, it is usually their tangible characteristics that are examined. In B2C brand literature, intangible aspects and, the metaphor to see the brand as a person is widely discussed (Aaker, 1997). However, there is very little research on brand as a person element in the B2B context. Brand personality is normally defined as the human characteristics associated with a brand, More research into the brand personality building processes in a B2B context are therefore needed. Following the above discussion this study’s aim is to investigate how brand personality is built in B2B companies.

A qualitative approach has been adopted to enable us to investigate, in-depth, an under-researched area (Ghauri and Gronhaug, 2010; and Yin, 1989) The key factor underpinning the selection of the two cases was conceptual relevance rather than representative grounds, so we used theoretical sampling (Miles and Huberman 1994). We combined secondary data research and field interviews and workshops with the CEOs in the case firms. The researchers constructed an interview-guide based on earlier literature and discussion in a workshop. Our aim and research question served as the basic structure for data analysis.  The study contributes to the literature by integrating theory on brand building from the marketing fields with the research dealing with the born global phenomenon discussed in the international entrepreneurship field.

Keywords
Born globals, Business to Business, Brand building. Brand personalities
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-37789 (URN)
Conference
The 22nd McGill International Entrepreneurship Conference, 22-24 September, 2018, Halmstad, Sweden
Available from: 2018-08-27 Created: 2018-08-27 Last updated: 2018-09-25Bibliographically approved
Iddris, F. & Awuah, G. B. (2018). The Role of Innovation Capability on Internationalisation of Low-Tech Manufacturing Firms. In: : . Paper presented at The 22nd McGill International Entrepreneurship Conference, 22-24 September, 2018, Halmstad, Sweden.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Role of Innovation Capability on Internationalisation of Low-Tech Manufacturing Firms
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The purpose of this study is to explore innovation capability and its effect on internationalisation of small low-tech herbal manufacturing firms, thereby also contributing to theory development in the subject area. 

Design/methodology/approach: A single case study method is adopted to explore the process of innovation capability of low-tech manufacturing for internationalisation process. 

Findings: Our result indicates that in low-tech herbal manufacturing innovation capability has been crucial for the company’s internationalization. The uniqueness of the products is derived from mutual learning, collaboration, most importantly team work pertaining in the organisation. The findings in this study support the notion that the development of innovation capability in a natural resource-based sector could be pursued as a strategy for internationalisation in countries like Ghana. 

Research limitations/implications: 

In this study we attempted to examine low-tech manufacturing firms’ innovation capability and how it affects internationalisation. Our study, like any study, suffers from some limitations. First, the data is based on a single firm. Ideally we would like to include data from few more firms. However, getting data from innovative companies is a difficult task. Future research may consider multiple case studies within the same sector or across different sectors. 

Originality/Value: Although the research field of innovation capability is growing lately, few attempts have been made to explore innovation capability and its effect on internationalisation process of low-tech manufacturing firms.

Keywords
innovation capability, low-tech, learning, collaboration, herbal medicine
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-37930 (URN)
Conference
The 22nd McGill International Entrepreneurship Conference, 22-24 September, 2018, Halmstad, Sweden
Available from: 2018-09-08 Created: 2018-09-08 Last updated: 2018-09-25Bibliographically approved
Andersson, S., Awuah, G. B., Aagerup, U. & Wictor, I. (2017). Customer Value Creation in Mature Born Globals. In: : . Paper presented at The 21st McGill International Entrepreneurship conference, Galway, Ireland, Aug. 30th - Sept. 1st, 2017.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Customer Value Creation in Mature Born Globals
2017 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

INTRODUCTION

Research on firms that already from their inception see the whole world as a market and/or the whole world as a source to access resources, so called born globals (Andersson & Wictor, 2003, Knight & Cavusgil, 2004; Cavusgil & Knight, 2015), has been growing during the last decades  (Servantie, 2016). Born globals are an especially interesting group of firms to study, in regard of value creation, as they have been able to create competitive offers fulfilling the needs of customers on global markets.

 The distinguishing feature of born globals is their international behaviour at birth and soon thereafter. The firms’ behaviour is initiated by the entrepreneurs’ and management’s global mindset and the commitment of resources leading to international growth (Andersson, 2000; Knight & Causgil, 2004). Born globals is, by definition, a born global firm “forever”, as has been characterized by their early years.  We argue that the early years make these firms a special type of firms that will influence their further international development. Firms with a long-term focus on the domestic market must unlearn routines rooted in the domestic context before new, internationally oriented routines can be learned. An early entrance to international markets forces born globals to adopt to new contexts and create new knowledge that leads to new routines and creates a culture in the firms to adapt to new international opportunities (Andersson & Evers, 2015; Autio et al ., 2000, Cavusgil & Knight, 2004).

There has been extensive research on born globals’ internationalization dealing with which markets, and market channels firms should choose to grow internationally. There has also been extensive research dealing with antecedents and factors influencing these choices. The focus on born global research has also been on the very early stages in the internationalization process. Few studies have captured the long-term behaviour and growth of born globals (2008; Gabrielsson and Gabrielsson, 2013, Melen Hånell, Nordman and Sharma, 2014). A question that has been very little addressed is: what happens to born global firms when they grow up (Cavusgil & Knight, 2015)? In this study we define this grown up born global firms as mature born globals (c. f. Hagen & Zuchella, 2014, maturing born global firms). To succeed with a continued international expansion, the born global firms need to increase sales on international markets. The underlying reason for success on international markets and continuous growth is that the mature born global firms have an offer that gives higher value to the customer than their competitors. However customer value is not explicitly treated in internationalization theories (Axinn & Matthyssen, 2002). To our knowledge there has not been any research that has, in- depth, explored how mature born globals create value for customers to create international growth. In line with the above discussion, the aim of this study is to investigate how mature born global firms create value for customers to create international growth.

METHOD

A qualitative approach has been adopted to enable us to investigate, in-depth, an under-researched area (Ghauri and Gronhaug, 2010; and Yin, 1989) “how born global firms create value for customers to create international growth”. In all, the study was conducted with five companies. The key factor underpinning the selection of the five cases was conceptual relevance rather than representative grounds, so we used theoretical sampling (Miles and Huberman 1994). We conducted a review of annual reports, other secondary documentation, and the websites of the case firms. We combined secondary data research and field interviews and workshops with the CEOs in the case firms. The researchers constructed an interview-guide based on earlier literature and discussion on a works-shop. Interviews were carried out with the five CEOs and transcribed. Data analysis included several steps. The information from the interviews, and other sources served as descriptive narratives, which helped us process the large volume of data (Mintzberg and McHugh 1985). This process enabled the unique patterns of each case to emerge before cross-case comparison (Eisenhardt 1989; Yin 1994) was undertaken. Our aim and research question served as the basic structure for data analysis.

CONCLUSIONS

We conclude that a strong focus on customer value creation was in focus. To create customer value a combination of proactive and reactive market orientation was implemented built on a competitive offer that was hard to replicate. Depending on the characteristics of the buyer-seller relationship different tools were used to build relationship value. The revenue earned is invested in further international growth, by investing in market driving activities, and entrepreneurial alertness to act on upcoming opportunities was crucial. This study contributes to the international entrepreneurship field by explicitly including marketing literature and empirically investigating how value is created to achieve international growth in born globals. This study also contributes to the industrial marketing field by developing a model that shows how born global firms create value for international customers to generate international growth in a B2B context.

Keywords
Born Globals, value creation, international growth, customer value, marketing orientation, trust
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-34879 (URN)
Conference
The 21st McGill International Entrepreneurship conference, Galway, Ireland, Aug. 30th - Sept. 1st, 2017
Projects
KK - International Growth in Born Globals
Funder
Knowledge Foundation
Available from: 2017-09-05 Created: 2017-09-05 Last updated: 2017-09-08Bibliographically approved
Amos, G. J. & Baffour Awuah, G. (2017). In search of competitiveness through innovation-driven CSR initiatives in Multinational Enterprise subsidiaries in developing countries. Journal of Developing Country Studies, 7(2), 161-173
Open this publication in new window or tab >>In search of competitiveness through innovation-driven CSR initiatives in Multinational Enterprise subsidiaries in developing countries
2017 (English)In: Journal of Developing Country Studies, ISSN 2224-607X, E-ISSN 2225-0565, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 161-173Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose – The objective of the present study is to investigate opportunities for integrating innovation and CSR in the context of firms’ activities. This is explored by investigating the extent to which innovation may complement CSR activities of MNE subsidiaries in developing-countries.

Method/approach – This paper employs literature study to describe how innovation complements CSR in the search for competitiveness at the level of the firm. In doing so, the competitiveness of firms, which is often driven by the demands for responsible behaviour and innovativeness, is derived from studying the extant literature. By drawing from multiple theoretical lenses (i.e., legitimacy theory, stakeholder theory, CSR literature, firms’ reputation, and innovativeness), we aim at evaluating their collective impact on firms’ competitiveness.

Findings - The model suggests that firm’s contextual capabilities (e.g. legitimacy, innovation, and stakeholders) can define its CSR activities (e.g. CSR ethical, CSR social, and CSR environmental). The cumulative effects of these, define firm’s reputation, which eventually, produces firm’s own competitiveness. The study has argued that there is more to firms’ stakeholders than ordinary resources required in furtherance of firms’ economic objectives. It therefore follows that stakeholders’ potential to constitute a pool of resources and capabilities that the firm can blend with to realize its strategic objectives ought to be stressed. Consequently, markets and for that matter firms, are subject to CSR and innovation demands through, for example, more socially responsible productive behaviour. This requires that MNE subsidiaries in developing-countries connect different strategies towards improving their own competitiveness. This may be accomplished through, re-packaging CSR into bundles of interrelated activities, collaborating with stakeholders to jointly create and deliver social and economic values, and integrating CSR into productive activities that may lead to bundles of products to suit local market conditions.

© www.iiste.org

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: International Institute for Science, Technology & Education, 2017
Keywords
CSR, innovation, MNE subsidiaries, MNEs, reputation, developing-countries
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-33413 (URN)
Available from: 2017-03-06 Created: 2017-03-06 Last updated: 2018-03-23Bibliographically approved
Iddris, F., Baffour Awuah, G. & Desalegn Abraha, G. (2016). Achieving supply chain agility through innovation capability building. International Journal of Supply Chain and Operations Resilience, 2(2), 114-143
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Achieving supply chain agility through innovation capability building
2016 (English)In: International Journal of Supply Chain and Operations Resilience, ISSN 2052-8698, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 114-143Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Few studies have examined the innovation capability perspective in the context of supply chain, and in particular toward achieving supply chain agility. The purpose of this study was to deepened our understanding of how a focal firm, in conjunction with customers, suppliers, and other supply chain members build innovation capability, leading to supply chain agility. Using qualitative case study approach, this paper explores how focal firms together with supply chain members build innovation capability, leading to supply chain agility. The study reveals that supply chain members play a critical role in influencing how a focal firms build their innovation capability to swiftly respond to increasing change in customers existing and potential need through agile supply chains. Drawing inspiration from theories of Resource-Based View of the firm and Dynamic Capability, this study contributes to growing streams of literature on innovation capability by explaining how supply chains build innovation capability, leading to supply chain agility. Building innovation capability in conjunction with supply chain members is crucial for achieving supply chain agility (e.g improved customer service, new product introduction, product customisation and international delivery capacity). Copyright © 2016 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Olney, Bucks: InderScience Publishers, 2016
Keywords
supply chain agility, learning, innovation capability, collaboration, cloud computing, trust, agile supply chains, resource-based view, RBV, customer service, new product introduction, NPI, product customisation, international delivery capacity
National Category
Economics and Business
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-31288 (URN)10.1504/IJSCOR.2016.078181 (DOI)
Available from: 2016-06-20 Created: 2016-06-20 Last updated: 2018-03-22Bibliographically approved
Andersson, S., Awuah, G. & Wictor, I. (2016). Analyzing Capabilities which Born Global Firms Develop and Implement for their International Growth. In: : . Paper presented at 20th McGill International Entrepreneurship Conference at Department of Management, Hanken School of Economics, Vaasa, Finland, August 23-25, 2016.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Analyzing Capabilities which Born Global Firms Develop and Implement for their International Growth
2016 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The aim of this paper is to investigate how born global firms co-operate with local and international network actors to provide innovations for international growth, Consequently, born globals’ use of their own innovation capabilities, stemming from firm-specific advantages, and their access to complementary resources and activities of their network partners, termed here as network capabilities, are analyzed to aid our understanding of the provision of innovative solutions that lead to firms’ international growth. The paper opted for an exploratory study, using a qualitative case study approach of five born global companies. Focus groups, work-shops and interviews with the entrepreneur-CEOs in the companies are used to gain deep insight into innovation and internationalization processes that underlie the case companies’ international growth. The study shows that the entrepreneur-CEOs’ networking and innovation capabilities, have been crucial for the born global firms international growth. A high responsiveness to changes in the environment and incremental rather than radical innovation characterize the firms’ growth. A fruitful relationship between the Born Globals and other actors is crucial for them to be able to get access to resources, which can complement their own to create innovative solutions that will lead to growth. 

Keywords
Born Global, innovation, internationalization, growth, innovation capabilities, network capabilities
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-31877 (URN)
External cooperation:
Conference
20th McGill International Entrepreneurship Conference at Department of Management, Hanken School of Economics, Vaasa, Finland, August 23-25, 2016
Available from: 2016-08-28 Created: 2016-08-28 Last updated: 2018-03-22Bibliographically approved
Payan, J. M., Hair, J., Svensson, G., Andersson, S. & Awuah, G. (2016). The Precursor Role of Cooperation, Coordination, and Relationship Assets in a Relationship Model. Journal of Business-to-Business Marketing, 23(1), 63-79
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Precursor Role of Cooperation, Coordination, and Relationship Assets in a Relationship Model
Show others...
2016 (English)In: Journal of Business-to-Business Marketing, ISSN 1051-712X, E-ISSN 1547-0628, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 63-79Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The primary purpose of this study is to test the importance of activity-oriented precursors in a relationship model. This study supports the theoretical view that firms create trust and knowledge through activities and these activities make a commitment decision less risky (Johanson & Vahlne, 2009). The secondary purpose of this study is to collect and examine data from interorganizational relationships in both Sweden and the United States. By including data from two countries, results will be more generalizable. Results can also lead to several managerial implications.

Methodology/approach: This study focuses on a sample of distributors from both the United States and Sweden. One hundred sixty-one usable surveys were returned from the U.S. survey, for a response rate of 27%. One hundred twenty-four usable surveys were returned from the Swedish survey, for a response rate of 21%. The PLS-SEM method was used to examine the model’s constructs.

Findings: Similar to past research results show that trust and commitment have a direct positive influence on satisfaction, and that trust also has a direct positive influence on commitment. However, this study uniquely supports four out of six newly tested hypotheses. Both cooperation and relationship assets have a direct positive influence on commitment. Cooperation has a direct positive influence on trust and commitment. Relationship assets have a direct negative influence on trust but a direct positive influence on commitment. Surprisingly, two hypotheses were not supported: Coordination did not have a significant relationship with either trust or commitment.

Research implications: Managers who want to achieve a satisfactory relationship based on trust and commitment need to prioritize their attention toward cooperation. They should also be aware that participation in joint activities (i.e., coordination and relationship investments) does not guarantee higher levels of trust or commitment in the relationship. It is the quality of the joint activities and the how dependent firms are on each other and not just participation in joint activities that are likely to create higher levels of trust or commitment. The quality of coordination and manageable levels of dependence may counteract the higher costs associated with joint activities compared to the costs associated with cooperation. Managers may  be wise to not make major commitments to other firms unless high quality joint activities have created knowledge and trust between firms.

Originality/value/contribution: The model adds the joint activity-oriented antecedents associated with collaboration which is essential to a successful relationship. Because of the high failure rate of collaboration may be due to cooperation and coordination failures and because these two constructs are underspecified in interorganizational research, this study is unique in examining activity-oriented antecedents in a trust/commitment model of relationship satisfaction in a crosscultural context (i.e., with U.S. and Swedish samples). © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Philadelphia: Routledge, 2016
Keywords
commitment, cooperation, coordination, distributor-supplier relationships, relationship investments, satisfaction, trust
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-30769 (URN)10.1080/1051712X.2016.1148455 (DOI)000374578600005 ()2-s2.0-85032082986 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-04-19 Created: 2016-04-19 Last updated: 2018-03-22Bibliographically approved
Deraz, H., Awuah, G. B. & Gebrekidan, D. A. (2015). Assessing the Value of Social Network Sites’ Advertisements. In: Jean-Marc Lehu (Ed.), Proceedings of the Third International Conference on E-Technologies and Business on the Web, Paris, France 2015: . Paper presented at Third International Conference on E-Technologies and Business on the Web (EBW), Paris, France, March 26-28, 2015 (pp. 89-101). Paris: Society of Digital Information and Wireless Communications (SDIWC)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assessing the Value of Social Network Sites’ Advertisements
2015 (English)In: Proceedings of the Third International Conference on E-Technologies and Business on the Web, Paris, France 2015 / [ed] Jean-Marc Lehu, Paris: Society of Digital Information and Wireless Communications (SDIWC) , 2015, p. 89-101Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed) [Artistic work]
Abstract [en]

Marketers use social network sites (SNSs) to merchandise their products and services more efficiently. However, the scope of the published studies about assessing social network sites advertisements’ value (SNSAV) is limited. The present study consequently aims to include credibility and interactivity in addition to informativeness and entertainment and irritation values as variables for the assessment of SNSAV, as perceived by SNS users.

The data analysis supports the central concepts of this study that informativeness, credibility, interactivity and entertainment values are the main variables of assessing SNSAV, while irritation value has no significant effect on the assessment of SNSAV. Moreover, according to the beta coefficient, informativeness and entertainment values, in conjunction with credibility and interactivity values, have different effects on consumers’ assessment of SNSAV compared to the results of the previous studies.

This study is successful in terms of introducing advertisements’ credibility and interactivity as crucial variables in the assessment of SNSAV. It is also successful with regard to offering a new construct model for assessing SNSAV based on four main dimensions: informativeness, entertainment and credibility and interactivity values. According to the data analysis, interactivity value has the highest significant effect with regard to the assessment of SNSAs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Paris: Society of Digital Information and Wireless Communications (SDIWC), 2015
Keywords
Advertising value, E-marketing, Social Network Ads, Social Network Sites
National Category
Economics and Business
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-28030 (URN)978-1-941968-08-6 (ISBN)
Conference
Third International Conference on E-Technologies and Business on the Web (EBW), Paris, France, March 26-28, 2015
Available from: 2015-03-31 Created: 2015-03-31 Last updated: 2015-04-09Bibliographically approved
Deraz, H., Awuah, G. & Gebrekidan, D. A. (2015). Factors Predicting Consumers’ Assessment of Advertisements on Social Networking Sites. International Journal of Digital Information and Wireless Communications (IJDIWC), 5(2), 111-123
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Factors Predicting Consumers’ Assessment of Advertisements on Social Networking Sites
2015 (English)In: International Journal of Digital Information and Wireless Communications (IJDIWC), ISSN 2225-658X, E-ISSN 2225-658X, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 111-123Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Marketers act on social networking sites (SNSs) in order to be more efficient in merchandising their products and/or services. Even so, the scope of the published studies regarding the assessment of advertisements on social networking sites (SNAs) is limited. Consequently, the present study aimed to consider credibility and interactivity, in addition to information, entertainment and irritation values, as main factors for consumers’ assessment of SNAs, as perceived by SNSs’ users.An analysis of empirical data helped to identify four main factors for assessing SNAs. These were: information value, entertainment value, credibility value and interactivity value. Irritation value was the only factor that had no significant effect on the assessment of SNAs. Furthermore, based on the beta coefficients, the information and entertainment values of SNAs, in conjunction with credibility and interactivity values, had different outcomes from previous studies. Consequently, the interactivity value was the strongest among the four predictors for assessing SNAs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hong Kong: Society of Digital Information and Wireless Communications, 2015
National Category
Communication Studies Information Systems, Social aspects Economics and Business
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-28127 (URN)10.17781/P001671 (DOI)
Available from: 2015-04-20 Created: 2015-04-20 Last updated: 2018-11-05Bibliographically approved
Andersson, S. & Baffour Awuah, G. (2015). International Growth in Born Globals – Continued Growth through Networking on Institutionally Distant Markets. In: Jorma Larimo, Niina Mummela and Tuija Mainela (Ed.), Handbook On International Alliance and Network Research: (pp. 139-154). Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>International Growth in Born Globals – Continued Growth through Networking on Institutionally Distant Markets
2015 (English)In: Handbook On International Alliance and Network Research / [ed] Jorma Larimo, Niina Mummela and Tuija Mainela, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2015, p. 139-154Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The aim of this chapter is to shed light on how a born global can obtain continued growth internationally, in institutionally distant markets. We are seeking a deeper understanding of international growth for born global enterprises by combining theories of networks and institutional perspective. We discuss how institutional distance affects the internationalization processes in born globals. We seek to highlight why and how a born global firm does enter different markets. In this respect, born globals from developed countries and those from emerging markets are compared, leading us to derive some propositions from our discussions.

Finally some suggestions for future research are presented. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2015
Keywords
Born globals, international growth, institutions, emerging markets, networks
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-28640 (URN)9781783475476 (ISBN)9781783475483 (ISBN)
Funder
Knowledge Foundation
Available from: 2015-06-18 Created: 2015-06-18 Last updated: 2015-06-22Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-0554-9591

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