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Arvidsson, S., Nylander, M. & Bergman, S. (2019). Callers´perceptions of their contact with a rheumatology telephone helpline. Musculoskeletal Care, 17(1), 105-112
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Callers´perceptions of their contact with a rheumatology telephone helpline
2019 (English)In: Musculoskeletal Care, ISSN 1478-2189, E-ISSN 1557-0681, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 105-112Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Telephone helplines are useful for improving patients' access to healthcare services and reducing the need for frequent face‐to‐face contact with healthcare professionals. Little is known about how people who phone a helpline perceive the encounter.

Objectives: The aims of the present study were to describe the variation in how callers perceive their encounter with a rheumatology telephone helpline.

Methods: The  study  had  a  descriptive,  qualitative  design  and  used  a phenomenographic approach, comprising 27 semi‐structured telephone interviews with callers to Rheuma Direct, a rheumatology telephone helpline with specially trained nurses. The callers comprised 22 women and five men, aged 22–89 years (mean 54 years).

Results: The callers phoned Rheuma Direct when they had problems obtaining answers to questions on the internet or from healthcare professionals. Three descriptive categories emerged: constructive dialogue, specialized competence and applicability. The callers perceived that it was a constructive dialogue when they were able to discuss their concerns with someone, received emotional support, felt reassured and were satisfied with the information provided. They perceived specialized competence when the nurses were experienced and skilful, the advice provided complemented previously received information and when they had more knowledge after the call. The callers perceived that Rheuma Direct had applicability because it was easy to access and they could make different choices before, during and after the telephone call. 

Conclusions: Callers to a rheumatology telephone helpline perceived it as a valuable complement to other sources of information, and felt that it could provide them with the tools to manage their disease better, as well as future contacts with healthcare professionals. © 2018 The Authors Musculoskeletal Care published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford: John Wiley & Sons, 2019
Keywords
nurse, qualitative research, rheumatology
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-38460 (URN)10.1002/msc.1374 (DOI)30468564 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85057111450 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding: Swedish Rheumatism Association (grant number: R‐558491) & Spenshult Research and Development Centre

Available from: 2018-11-30 Created: 2018-11-30 Last updated: 2019-03-29Bibliographically approved
Karlsson, S., Arvidsson, S., Cuesta, M., Millberg German, L. & Nilsson, C. (2018). HICube Kompetenta vården, Delrapport: Välfärdsteknik ur ett etiskt perspektiv, Varbergs kommun.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>HICube Kompetenta vården, Delrapport: Välfärdsteknik ur ett etiskt perspektiv, Varbergs kommun
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2018 (Swedish)Report (Other academic)
Publisher
p. 35
National Category
Other Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-38081 (URN)
Projects
HICube Kompetenta vården
Funder
European Social Fund (ESF)
Available from: 2018-09-30 Created: 2018-09-30 Last updated: 2018-10-02Bibliographically approved
Arvidsson, S., Nylander, M. & Bergman, S. (2017). People's perceptions of their phone call with rheuma directly, a rheumatic diseases helpline. Paper presented at EULAR (European Leauge against Rheumatism) Annual European Congress of Rheumatology, Madrid, Spain, 14–17 June, 2017. Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, 76(Suppl. 2), 1544-1545, Article ID AB1238-HPR.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>People's perceptions of their phone call with rheuma directly, a rheumatic diseases helpline
2017 (English)In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 76, no Suppl. 2, p. 1544-1545, article id AB1238-HPRArticle in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background Information on rheumatic diseases is often complex to understand or scary, and additional support is often necessary. Rheuma Directly (RD) is a helpline with specially trained nurses on rheumatic diseases, funded by the Swedish Rheumatism Association and Spenshult Research and Development Centre. Little is known of how people calling a helpline perceive the contact.

Objectives To describe the variation in how people perceive the contact with the helpline RD.

Methods The study had a descriptive, qualitative design with a phenomenographic approach and was carried out by means of 27 semi-structured telephone interviews. The informants were 22 female and 5 men, and their ages ranged from 22 to 89 years (mean 54 years).

Results The informants called RD when they had problems getting answers to their questions through the Internet or from healthcare professionals. Three different description categories emerged: Specific competence, Constructive dialogue, and Applicability. The informants' perceived Specific competence when the nurses were knowledgeable, the call was complementary to previously received information and when the informants had greater knowledge after the contact with RD. They perceived that it was a Constructive dialogue when they got someone to discuss with, a “sounding board”, and perceived emotional support, felt reassured and were satisfied with the answer. The informants perceived Applicability because RD was available and they could make different choices according to their own desire; before (how and when they would contact RD), during (what to tell and what question they would ask) and after (how and what they would do after the contact with RD).

Conclusions People calling RD perceived that the telephone call with the nurses meant meeting specific competence, gaining constructive dialogue and that the helpline was applicable. This knowledge ad to a fuller understanding of factors that from a caller's perspective, are important when calling a helpline with specially trained nurses on rheumatic diseases. © 2017, Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2017
Keywords
helpline, nurse, phenomenographic, rheumatic diseases
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-34724 (URN)10.1136/annrheumdis-2017-eular.2466 (DOI)000413181404651 ()
Conference
EULAR (European Leauge against Rheumatism) Annual European Congress of Rheumatology, Madrid, Spain, 14–17 June, 2017
Funder
Swedish Rheumatism Association, R-558491
Available from: 2017-08-15 Created: 2017-08-15 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Nylander, M. & Arvidsson, S. (2017). Ring & Fråga Reuma Direkt! – Vilket behov fyller frågelinjen?. In: : . Paper presented at Reumadagarna 2017, 13-15 september, Västerås, Sverige.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ring & Fråga Reuma Direkt! – Vilket behov fyller frågelinjen?
2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Keywords
Helpline, nurse, phenomenographic, rheumatic diseases
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-34999 (URN)
Conference
Reumadagarna 2017, 13-15 september, Västerås, Sverige
Funder
Swedish Rheumatism Association, R-558491
Available from: 2017-09-18 Created: 2017-09-18 Last updated: 2017-09-22Bibliographically approved
Almqvist-Tangen, G., Arvidsson, S., Alm, B., Bergman, S., Roswall, J., Dahlgren, J. & Nevonen, L. (2017). What makes parents act and react? Parental views and considerations relating to ‘child health’ during infancy. Journal of Child Health Care, 21(4), 415-423
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What makes parents act and react? Parental views and considerations relating to ‘child health’ during infancy
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2017 (English)In: Journal of Child Health Care, ISSN 1367-4935, E-ISSN 1741-2889, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 415-423Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Lifestyle factors and behaviours are adopted very early in life and tend to persist throughout life. Considering that the parents are the primary gatekeepers for their child’s health, there is a need to gain more knowledge and deeper understanding about what causes parents to act and react in order for early preventive efforts to have any effect. The aim was to explore the parental views and considerations concerning ‘child health’ among parents with infants 8–10 months old. The sample was strategic and 16 parents (aged 23–41) were recruited from three child health centres in Sweden. Open-ended interviews were conducted and a qualitative, manifest content analysis approach was utilized. The parents described the subject ‘child health’ as a large, multifaceted concept. Three categories emerged during data analysis: developing a sixth sense, being affected by perceptions and believing health and ill health as a continuum. The parents perceived food and feeding issues as one of the most worrying aspects and a significant indicator of ‘child health’. In order to meet the parents on their turf, the ‘healthy health message’ conveyed needs to take the parental perspective into consideration rather than attempting to educate the parents from predetermined assumption, belief and values. © The Author(s) 2017

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Sage Publications, 2017
Keywords
Child health, feeding, growth, interviews, parental views, qualitative design
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-34866 (URN)10.1177/1367493517727069 (DOI)29110521 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding: Research and Development Unit, Halland and Skandia, Old Mutual Insurance Company

Available from: 2017-09-04 Created: 2017-09-04 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Gilljam, B.-M., Arvidsson, S., Nygren, J. & Svedberg, P. (2016). Promoting participation in healthcare situations for children with JIA: a grounded theory study. International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, 11, Article ID 30518.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Promoting participation in healthcare situations for children with JIA: a grounded theory study
2016 (English)In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 11, article id 30518Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Children’s right to participate in their own healthcare has increasingly become highlighted in national and international research as well as in government regulations. Nevertheless, children’s participation in healthcare is unsatisfactorily applied in praxis. There is a growing body of research regarding children’s participation, but research from the children’s own perspective is scarce. The aim of this study was thus to explore the experiences and preferences for participation in healthcare situations among children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) as a foundation for creating strategies to promote their participation in pediatric healthcare. Twenty children, aged 8 to 17 years, with JIA were interviewed individually and in focus groups. In order to increase the children’s opportunities to express their own experiences, different interview techniques were used, such as draw-and-tell and role play with dolls. The analysis was conducted with a constructivist grounded theory. The result explores children’s perspective of influencing processes promoting their participation in healthcare situations. The core category that emerged was, “Releasing fear and uncertainty opens up for confidence and participation,” and the categories related to the core category are, “surrounded by a sense of security and comfort,” and “strengthened and supported to become involved.” In conclusion, the knowledge gained in this study offers new insights from the perspective of children themselves, and can constitute a valuable contribution to the understanding of necessary conditions for the development of specific interventions that promote participation among children in healthcare situations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Järfälla: Co-Action Publishing, 2016
Keywords
Children, healthcare, participation, constructivist grounded theory, Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis
National Category
Nursing Rheumatology and Autoimmunity
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-30525 (URN)10.3402/qhw.v11.30518 (DOI)000396163300001 ()2-s2.0-84982705815 (Scopus ID)
Note

This study was supported by grants from Region Halland, Norrbacka-Eugenia foundation, The Swedish Rheumatism Association, and the Stig-Thunes foundation.

Available from: 2016-03-15 Created: 2016-03-15 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Arvidsson, S., Gilljam, B.-M., Nygren, J., Ruland, C. M., Nordby-Bøe, T. & Svedberg, P. (2016). Redesign and Validation of Sisom, an Interactive Assessment and Communication Tool for Children With Cancer. JMIR mhealth and uhealth, 4(2), Article ID e76.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Redesign and Validation of Sisom, an Interactive Assessment and Communication Tool for Children With Cancer
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2016 (English)In: JMIR mhealth and uhealth, E-ISSN 2291-5222, Vol. 4, no 2, article id e76Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Children with cancer undergo intensive and long treatment periods that expose them and their families to a number of difficult physical, mental, and social challenges. Empowering children by actively involving them in their care can help them to cope with these challenges. It can, however, be difficult for children to be involved and talk about their illness experiences in a "traditional" conversation with health care professionals, especially for younger children. Sisom (Norwegian acronym "Si det som det er" or "Tell it how it is") is an interactive computer-based assessment and communication tool to give children (aged 6-12 years) with cancer a "voice" in their care. Because of technological advances and widespread use of mobile devices Sisom had to be redesigned to better meet the needs of children of today.

OBJECTIVE: To redesign Sisom for use on mobile devices and to validate and adapt it for use in a Swedish population of children with cancer.

METHODS: A user-experience design was used. Content adaptation included forward-backward translation by Swedish and Norwegian translators. Healthy children (n=5), children with experiences of cancer treatment (n=5) and their parents (n=5), and pediatric nurses (n=2) were then involved in culturally adapting Sisom to the Swedish context. The iterative low- and high-fidelity evaluation was supported by a think aloud method, semistructured interviews, and drawings to capture children's views of Sisom. The redesign and evaluation continued until no further changes or improvements were identified by the participants or the researchers.

RESULTS: Children, parents, and pediatric nurses offered many suggestions for improvements to the original version in terms of content, aesthetics, and usability of Sisom. The most significant change that emerged through user input was a modification that entailed not using problem-focused statements in the assessment items. The parents and pediatric nurses considered the revised assessment items to be general and less diagnosis specific. The evaluation of aesthetics resulted in brighter colors and more positive and exciting details in the animations. The evaluation of usability included improvements of the verbal instructions on how to navigate in Sisom 2, and also that the answers to assessmentitems in Sisom 2 should be saved to provide the children with the option to pause and to continue answering the remaining assessment items at a later stage.

CONCLUSIONS: Overall, this paper describes the process of using user-experience design with children in order to redesign and validate an interactive assessment and communication tool and how the outcomes of this process resulted in a new version, Sisom 2. All participants confirmed the usability and qualities of using the final version. Future research should be directed toward the implementation of Sisom 2 in clinical practice and to evaluate outcomes from individual and organizational levels.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Toronto: JMIR Publications Inc., 2016
Keywords
cancer, children, communication, mobile app, participation, validation
National Category
Other Health Sciences Nursing Human Computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-31387 (URN)10.2196/mhealth.5715 (DOI)000381182400044 ()27343004 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Childhood Cancer FoundationKnowledge Foundation
Note

The research was financially supported by the Swedish Childhood Cancer Foundation, the Knowledge Foundation, Region Halland, and the Center of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport at Halmstad University.

Available from: 2016-06-26 Created: 2016-06-26 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Gilljam, B.-M., Arvidsson, S., Nygren, J. & Svedberg, P. (2015). Involving Children with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis in Health-Related Research – Why and How?. Paper presented at EULAR 2015, 16th Annual European Congress of Rheumatology – European League Against Rheumatism, Rome, Italy, 10-13 June, 2015. Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, 74(Suppl. 2), 1312-1312
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Involving Children with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis in Health-Related Research – Why and How?
2015 (English)In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 74, no Suppl. 2, p. 1312-1312Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Children with severe Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) are exposed to care situations and harsh treatments such as intra-articular corticosteroid injections (1). In order for these children to feel confidence, it is important they understand and feel they have control over the situation. To support the wellbeing of these children and their involvement in care, it is important to investigate their views of the care process and their everyday life (2).

Objectives: The purpose of this study is to describe our experiences of using different activities and techniques during interviews with children with JIA.

Methods: Children (n=23) from two rheumatic pediatric clinics in Sweden, age 8 - 17, diagnosed with JIA since at least two years were interviewed individually or in focus groups. All interviews focused on experiences and preferences of participating in care situations. Among the younger children, age 8 - 12, we used activities such as sentence completion, to express three wishes, draw and tell, and role-play with Barbie dolls. Among the older ones, age 13 – 17, we used sentence completion, to express three wishes and post-IT tabs for brainstorming and subsequent discussion. During all interviews we used open-ended questions.

Results: Sentence completion and three wishes were two weak techniques for most of the children regardless of age. The younger children often responded to these techniques with silence or responses like “I don't know”. The older children responded with intense reflection and thinking, and predominately came up with one wish only. Techniques that were powerful in activating discussions were draw and tell and role-play with Barbie dolls for the younger children. Using Post-IT tabs and discussions was a good starter for discussions for the older children in focus groups.

Conclusions: There is reason to reflect on what techniques researchers use when interviewing children, as the prospects of capturing children's perspectives in research is largely dependent on the researcher's ability to engage children in the interview situation. Different interview methods should be used depending on the age of the informants, the purpose of the investigation, and the capabilities, such as the health status, of the child. In this study, we experienced that the participants ability to express their experiences and preferences can be facilitated with practical techniques, like drawing and role-play with Barbie dolls for younger children and Post-IT tabs for children in older age groups.

References:

Bertilsson L. Andersson-Gäre B. Fasth A. Forsblad-d'Elia H. A 5-year prospective population-based study of juvenile chronic arthritis: onset, disease process, and outcome. Scandinavian journal of rheumatology 2012; 41(5): 379-382.

Coyne I. Hayes E. Gallagher P. Regan G. Giving children a voice: investigation of children's experiences of participation in consultation and decision-making in Irish hospitals. Office of the Minister for Children 2006; 3576.

Acknowledgements: Thanks to: The Swedish Rheumatic Foundation, Stig Thunes Foundation and Norrbacka Eugenia Foundation.

Disclosure of Interest: None declared

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: BMJ Books, 2015
Keywords
Participation, child, rheumatology
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-28756 (URN)10.1136/annrheumdis-2015-eular.2044 (DOI)000215799104266 ()
Conference
EULAR 2015, 16th Annual European Congress of Rheumatology – European League Against Rheumatism, Rome, Italy, 10-13 June, 2015
Available from: 2015-06-23 Created: 2015-06-23 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Sjöberg, C., Amhliden, H., Nygren, J., Arvidsson, S. & Svedberg, P. (2015). The perspective of children on factors influencing their participation in perioperative care. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 24(19-20), 2945-2953
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The perspective of children on factors influencing their participation in perioperative care
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2015 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 24, no 19-20, p. 2945-2953Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims and objectives

To describe the experiences of participation in perioperative care of 8- to 11-year-old children.

Background

All children have the right to participate in decisions that affect them and have the right to express their views in all matters that concern them. Allowing children to be involved in their perioperative care can make a major difference in terms of their well-being by decreasing fear and anxiety and having more positive experiences. Taking the views of children into account and facilitating their participation could thus increase the quality of care.

Design

Descriptive qualitative design.

Methods

The study was conducted in 2013 and data were collected by narrative interviews with 10 children with experience from perioperative care in Sweden. Qualitative content analysis was chosen to describe the variations, differences and similarities in children's experiences of participation in perioperative care.

Results

The result showed that receiving preparatory information, lack of information regarding postoperative care and wanting to have detailed information are important factors for influencing children's participation. Interaction with healthcare professionals, in terms of being listened to, being a part of the decision-making and feeling trust, is important for children's participation in the decision-making process. Poor adaptation of the care environment to the children's needs, feeling uncomfortable while waiting and needs for distraction are examples of how the environment and the care in the operating theatre influence the children's experiences of participation.

Conclusions

Efforts should be made to improve children's opportunities for participation in the context of perioperative care and further research is needed to establish international standards for information strategies and care environment that promotes children's participation in perioperative care.

Relevance to clinical practice

Nurse anaesthetists need to acquire knowledge and develop strategies for providing preparatory visits and information to children prior to surgery as well as reducing waiting times and creating environments with meaningful and tailored opportunities for distraction in perioperative care. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell, 2015
Keywords
Children, healthcare, nurse anaesthetists, participation, shared decision-making, qualitative content analysis
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-28764 (URN)10.1111/jocn.12911 (DOI)000362908200026 ()26215896 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84942192757 (Scopus ID)
Note

Partial funding for the study came from Region Halland in Sweden.

Available from: 2015-06-23 Created: 2015-06-23 Last updated: 2018-07-19Bibliographically approved
Arvidsson, S., Bergman, S., Arvidsson, B., Fridlund, B. & Tingström, P. (2013). Effects of a self-care promoting problem-based learning programme in people with rheumatic diseases: a randomized controlled study. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 69(7), 1500-1514
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of a self-care promoting problem-based learning programme in people with rheumatic diseases: a randomized controlled study
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2013 (English)In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 69, no 7, p. 1500-1514Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: To evaluate the effects of a self-care promoting problem-based learning programme for people with rheumatic diseases in terms of health-related quality of life, empowerment, and self-care ability.

Background: Individuals with rheumatoid arthritis express a great need for education and support in adapting to the disease, but the average qualities of studies about patient education interventions are not high. There is no evidence of long-term benefits of patient education.

Design: Randomized controlled trial.

Methods: A randomized controlled design was selected with test at baseline, 1-week and 6-month post-interventions after completed the 1-year programme. The tests consisted of validity and reliability tested instruments. The participants were randomly assigned in spring 2009 to either the experimental group (n = 54) or the control group (n = 148). The programme was running alongside the standard care the participants received at a rheumatology unit. Parametric and non-parametric tests were used in the analyses.

Results: The participants in the experimental group had statistically significant stronger empowerment after participation in the self-care promoting problem-based learning programme compared with the control group, at the 6-month post-intervention. Approximately, two-thirds of the participants in the experimental group stated that they had implemented lifestyle changes due to the programme.

Conclusion: The self-care promoting problem-based learning programme enabled people with rheumatic diseases to improve their empowerment compared with the control group. It is important to continue to develop problem-based learning in patient education to find the very best way to use this pedagogical method in rheumatology care. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell, 2013
Keywords
empowerment, nursing, patient education, problem-based learning, rheumatic diseases, self-care
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-20653 (URN)10.1111/jan.12008 (DOI)000319829000006 ()22973890 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84878623956 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding: The Swedish Rheumatism Association, the Region Halland, the South Regional Health Care Committee, the Stig Thunes Foundation Fund for Health Care Research, the Norrbacka-Eugenia Foundation, the Association of Rheumatology Nurses in Sweden, and the Spenshult Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases.

Available from: 2013-01-10 Created: 2013-01-10 Last updated: 2018-03-22Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-5647-086X

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