hh.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Publications (10 of 99) Show all publications
Pejner, N. M., Ourique de Morais, W., Lundström, J., Laurell, H. & Skärsäter, I. (2019). A Smart Home System for Information Sharing, Health Assessments, and Medication Self-Management for Older People: Protocol for a Mixed-Methods Study. JMIR Research Protocols, 8(4), Article ID e12447.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Smart Home System for Information Sharing, Health Assessments, and Medication Self-Management for Older People: Protocol for a Mixed-Methods Study
Show others...
2019 (English)In: JMIR Research Protocols, ISSN 1929-0748, E-ISSN 1929-0748, Vol. 8, no 4, article id e12447Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Older adults often want to stay in a familiar place, such as their home, as they get older. This so-called aging in place, which may involve support from relatives or care professionals, can promote older people’s independence and well-being. The combination of aging and disease, however, can lead to complex medication regimes, and difficulties for care providers in correctly assessing the older person's health. In addition, the organization of the health care is fragmented, which makes it difficult for health professionals to encourage older people to participate in their care. It is also a challenge to perform adequate health assessment and appropriate communication between health care professionals.

Objective: The purpose of this paper is to describe the design for an integrated home-based system that can acquire and compile health-related evidence for guidance and information sharing among care providers and care receivers in order to support and promote medication self-management among older people.

Methods: The authors used a participatory design (PD) approach for this mixed-method project, which was divided into four phases: Phase I, Conceptualization, consisted of the conceptualization of a system to support medication self- management, objective health assessments, and communication between health care professionals. Phase II, Development of a System, consisted of building and bringing together the conceptualized systems from phase I. Phases III (pilot study) and IV (a full-scale study) are described briefly.

Results: Our participants in phase I were people who were involved in some way in the care of older adults, and included older adults themselves, relatives of older adults, care professionals, and industrial partners. With input from phase I participants, we identified two relevant concepts for promoting medication self-management, both of which related to systems that participants believed could provide guidance for the older adults themselves, relatives of older adults, and care professionals. The system will also encourage information sharing between care providers and care receivers. The first is the concept of the Intelligent Friendly Home (IAFH), defined as an integrated residential system that evolves to sense, reason and act in response to individual needs, preferences and behaviors as these change over time. The second concept is the MedOP system, a system that would be supported by the IAFH, and which consists of three related components: one that assess health behaviors, another that communicates health data, and a third that promotes medication self-management.

Conclusions: The participants in this project were older adults, relatives of older adults, care professionals, and our industrial partners. With input from the participants, we identified two main concepts that could comprise a system for health assessment, communication and medication self-management: the Intelligent Friendly Home (IAFH), and the MedOP system. These concepts will be tested in this study to determine whether they can facilitate and promote medication self-management in older people. © The authors. All rights reserved. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Toronto: J M I R Publications, Inc., 2019
Keywords
assessments, medication, mixed methods, older people, self-management, smart homes
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-39753 (URN)10.2196/12447 (DOI)000466496800024 ()31038459 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85067859310 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-06-13 Created: 2019-06-13 Last updated: 2019-09-04Bibliographically approved
Lundström, S., Jormfeldt, H., Hedman Ahlström, B. & Skärsäter, I. (2019). Health-related lifestyle and perceived health among people with severe mental illness: Gender differences and degree of sense of coherence. Archives of Psychiatric Nursing, 33(2), 182-188
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Health-related lifestyle and perceived health among people with severe mental illness: Gender differences and degree of sense of coherence
2019 (English)In: Archives of Psychiatric Nursing, ISSN 0883-9417, E-ISSN 1532-8228, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 182-188Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

People with severe mental illness (SMI) experience an increased risk of physical ill health and premature death, which appears to be partly related to unhealthy lifestyle habits. The aim of this study was to describe the distribution of health-related lifestyle habits and perceived health among people with severe mental illness. A further aim was to explore if there were any gender differences or differences based on degree of sense of coherence. The study adopted a cross-sectional design based on data from 65 people with SMI. The results show that degree of Sense of Coherence (SOC) does have relevance for perceived health and for dimensions of Quality of Life (QOL). Furthermore, among the participants with strong SOC, there were less daily smokers and they seemed to have less sedentary leisure time than those with low SOC. Men reported more anxiety/depression than women and women ate fruit more often than men, otherwise there were no gender differences. In comparison with the general population, people with SMI show a higher Body Mass Index are more sedentary, more often daily smokers, have lower SOC and perceive a lower QOL. This emphasizes the importance of health-promotion support that focuses on lifestyle changes, and support for strengthening SOC and QOL for people with SMI. © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Maryland Heights, Missoury: Saunders Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Health, Lifestyle, Sense of Coherence, Severe mental illness, Quality of Life
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-39481 (URN)10.1016/j.apnu.2018.12.002 (DOI)000466833600008 ()30927988 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-05-27 Created: 2019-05-27 Last updated: 2019-05-29Bibliographically approved
de Ruiter, H. & Skärsäter, I. (2019). Introducing a Future-Oriented Approach to Healthcare Technologies and Welfare Techniques: A Swedish innovative ethics project. Creative Nursing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Introducing a Future-Oriented Approach to Healthcare Technologies and Welfare Techniques: A Swedish innovative ethics project
2019 (English)In: Creative Nursing, ISSN 1078-4535, E-ISSN 1946-1895Article in journal (Refereed) Accepted
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York, NY: Springer Publishing Company, 2019
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-40921 (URN)
Funder
Knowledge Foundation, 240009
Available from: 2019-11-13 Created: 2019-11-13 Last updated: 2019-11-26
Lundström, S., Jormfeldt, H., Hedman Ahlström, B. & Skärsäter, I. (2019). Mental health nurses’ experience of physical health care and health promotion initiatives for people with severe mental illness. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mental health nurses’ experience of physical health care and health promotion initiatives for people with severe mental illness
2019 (English)In: International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1445-8330, E-ISSN 1447-0349Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Health care for people with severe mental illness is often divided into physical health care and mental health care despite the importance of a holistic approach to caring for the whole person. Mental health nurses have an important role not only in preventing ill health, but also in promoting health, to improve the overall health among people with severe mental illness and to develop a more person-centred, integrated physical and mental health care. Thus, the aim of this study was to describe mental health nurses’ experiences of facilitating aspects that promote physical health and support a healthy lifestyle for people with severe mental illness. Interviews were conducted with mental health nurses (n = 15), and a qualitative content analysis was used to capture the nurse’s experiences. Analysis of the interviews generated three categories: (i) to have a health promotion focus in every encounter, (ii) to support with each person’s unique prerequisites in mind and (iii) to take responsibility for health promotion in every level of the organization. The results show the importance of a health promotion focus that permeates the entire organization of mental health care. Shared responsibility for health and health promotion activities should exist at all levels: in the person-centred care in the relation with the patient, embedded in a joint vision within the working unit, and in decisions at management level. © 2019 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Richmond: Wiley-Blackwell, 2019
Keywords
health promotion, lifestyle, mental health nursing, person-centred care, severe mental illness
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-40958 (URN)10.1111/inm.12669 (DOI)31663262 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-11-15 Created: 2019-11-15 Last updated: 2019-11-15
Melin, K., Skarphedinsson, G., Skärsäter, I., Storm Mowatt Haugland, B. & Ivarsson, T. (2018). A solid majority remit following evidence-based OCD treatments: a 3-year naturalistic outcome study in pediatric OCD. European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 27(10), 1373-1381
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A solid majority remit following evidence-based OCD treatments: a 3-year naturalistic outcome study in pediatric OCD
Show others...
2018 (English)In: European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, ISSN 1018-8827, E-ISSN 1435-165X, Vol. 27, no 10, p. 1373-1381Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study reports follow-up 2 and 3 years after the initial assessment of a sample of youth with a primary diagnosis of OCD. Participants were 109 children and adolescents, aged 5-17 years, recruited from a specialized, outpatient OCD clinic in Sweden. Patients were treated with cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), augmented when indicated by selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI). In cases where SSRIs were insufficient, augmentation with a second-generation antipsychotic (SGA) was applied. Participants were assessed with the Children's Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (CY-BOCS), Children's OCD Impact Scale (COIS), and Children's Depressive Inventory (CDI) at follow-ups 2 and 3 years after baseline assessment. Treatment response was defined as CY-BOCS total score ≤ 15, and remission was defined as CY-BOCS total score ≤ 10. Analyzing the outcomes with linear mixed-effects models (LME) showed a decrease in OCD symptom load from 23 to 6.9 at the 3-year follow-up. Moreover, two of three (66.1%) participants were in remission, and another 19.2% had responded to treatment at the 3-year follow-up. Thus, 85.3% of participants responded to treatment. Moreover, during the follow-up period, participants' psychosocial functioning had significantly improved, and depressive symptoms had significantly decreased. The results suggest that evidence-based treatment for pediatric OCD, following expert consensus guidelines, has long-term positive effects for most children and adolescents diagnosed with OCD. The results also indicate that improvements are maintained over a 3-year period, at least, and that improvement is also found with regard to psychosocial functioning and depressive symptoms. © 2018 Springer International Publishing AG

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Heidelberg: Springer, 2018
Keywords
Cognitive behavioral therapy, Follow-up, Long term, Obsessive–compulsive disorder, Pediatric, Serotonin uptake inhibitors, Treatment outcome
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-36379 (URN)10.1007/s00787-018-1137-9 (DOI)29502315 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85045036176 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-03-04 Created: 2018-03-04 Last updated: 2018-10-05Bibliographically approved
Skärsäter, I., Keogh, B., Doyle, L., Ellilä, H., Jormfeldt, H., Lahti, M., . . . Kilkku, N. (2018). Advancing the knowledge, skills and attitudes of mental health nurses working with families and caregivers: A critical review of the literature. Nurse Education in Practice, 32, 138-146
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Advancing the knowledge, skills and attitudes of mental health nurses working with families and caregivers: A critical review of the literature
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 32, p. 138-146Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Involving and supporting the family members and caregivers of people with mental illness is essential to high-quality mental health services. However, literature suggests that there is a lack of engagement between family members and mental health nurses (MHNs). Lack of knowledge among MHNs is often cited as one of the main reasons for this lack of engagement. The aim of this review was to explore the knowledge, skills and attitudes that are required by MHNs to enable to them to work more effectively with families affected by mental illness. A literature based critical review was used to access and review 35 papers in order to extract concepts that could inform the design of eLearning materials to assist MHNs advance their knowledge in this area. Two overarching themes were identified; ‘Mental health problems and the family’ and ‘Working with the family’. From these themes, the knowledge, skills and attitudes required to work more effectively with families are described. The findings from this review provide a descriptive account of the knowledge skills and attitudes that are required for effective family work. In addition, the review provides an empirical foundation for education programmes in the area. © 2018 Elsevier Ltd

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Caregivers, Family, Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice, Humans, Mental Disorders, Psychiatric Nursing
National Category
Nursing Medical Ethics Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-38737 (URN)10.1016/j.nepr.2018.07.002 (DOI)000447570600024 ()2-s2.0-85049647108 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-01-09 Created: 2019-01-09 Last updated: 2019-02-11Bibliographically approved
Jormfeldt, H., Doyle, L., Ellilä, H., Lahti, M., Higgins, A., Keogh, B., . . . Kilkku, N. (2018). Master’s level mental health nursing competencies, a prerequisite for equal health among service users in mental health care. International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, 13(S1), Article ID 1502013.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Master’s level mental health nursing competencies, a prerequisite for equal health among service users in mental health care
Show others...
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 13, no S1, article id 1502013Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: This discussion paper aims to explore the need of a clarified definition of master’s level mental health nursing competencies in terms of knowledge, skills and attitudes in a European context. Mental health service users have, in spite of their right to equal overall health, higher rates of physical illness and are more likely to experience premature death than the general population. Implementation of a holistic concept of health comprising mental, physical and social aspects of health in mental health services has previously proved to be challenging. Methods: Master’s level mental health nursing competencies in recent literature are discussed and illuminated in terms of knowledge, skills and attitudes in order to enable the promotion of equal overall health among service users in mental health services. Results: The discussion show contents, values and utility of master’s level mental health nursing competencies in mental health services and contribute to reduced role ambiguity by distinguishing master’s level responsibilities from undergraduate nursing tasks and obligations of other professionals in mental health care. Conclusion: This discussion paper shapes implications for developments in master’s level mental health nursing education curricula. © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Abingdon: Taylor & Francis, 2018
Keywords
Holistic health, “master’s level mental health nursing competencies”, mental health care, physical health
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-37711 (URN)10.1080/17482631.2018.1502013 (DOI)30067476 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85050919511 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding: This work was supported by the European Commission [European Commission  (2013-3403)/Life-long learning programme].

Available from: 2018-08-15 Created: 2018-08-15 Last updated: 2018-08-16Bibliographically approved
Doyle, L., Ellilä, H., Jormfeldt, H., Lahti, M., Higgins, A., Keogh, B., . . . Kilkku, N. (2018). Preparing master-level mental health nurses to work within a wellness paradigm: Findings from the eMenthe project. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, 27(2), 823-832
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Preparing master-level mental health nurses to work within a wellness paradigm: Findings from the eMenthe project
Show others...
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1445-8330, E-ISSN 1447-0349, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 823-832Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Mental health promotion remains an important component of mental health nursing practice. Supporting wellness at both the individual and societal levels has been identified as one of the key tenets of mental health promotion. However, the prevailing biomedical paradigm of mental health education and practice has meant that many nurses have not been equipped to incorporate a wellness perspective into their mental health practice. In the present study, we report on an exploratory study which details the knowledge, skills, and attitudes required by master-level mental health nurses to practice within a wellness paradigm from the perspective of three groups of key stakeholders: (i) service users and family members (n = 23); (ii) experienced mental health nurses (n = 49); and (iii) master-level mental health nursing students (n = 37). The findings, which were reported from individual and focus group interviews across five European countries, suggested a need to reorientate mental health nursing education to include a focus on wellness and resilience to equip mental health nurses with the skills to work within a strengths-based, rather than a deficits-based, model of mental health practice. Key challenges to working within a wellness paradigm were identified as the prevailing dominance of the biomedical model of cause and treatment of mental health problems, which focusses on symptoms, rather than the holistic functioning of the individual, and positions the person as passive in the nurse-service user relationship. © 2017 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Richmond, VIC: Wiley-Blackwell, 2018
Keywords
e-learning, mental health promotion, nurse education, wellness
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-34904 (URN)10.1111/inm.12370 (DOI)28786212 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding: European Commission/Lifelong Learning Programme

Available from: 2017-09-08 Created: 2017-09-08 Last updated: 2018-04-03Bibliographically approved
Lahti, M., Elliä, H., Jormfeldt, H., Skärsäter, I., Doyle, L., Higgins, A., . . . Kilkku, N. (2018). The required knowledge for lifespan mental health promotion and prevention for Master’s level mental health nurse education – the eMenthe project. International Journal of Health Promotion and Education, 56(3), 143-154
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The required knowledge for lifespan mental health promotion and prevention for Master’s level mental health nurse education – the eMenthe project
Show others...
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Health Promotion and Education, ISSN 1463-5240, E-ISSN 2164-9545, Vol. 56, no 3, p. 143-154Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this study, we address the kind of knowledge that is required for Master’s level nurse education for lifespan mental health promotion and prevention. Data were collected through structured interviews (N = 109). The interviews were conducted across five European countries. The data were analysed using a thematic content analysis approach. The findings show that Master’s level nurse education needs knowledge related to lifespan issues. Needs were raised in several issues like importance of increasing skills and knowledge of mental health workers. We conclude that there is a need to emphasise the knowledge required for mental health promotion and prevention for Master’s level nursing education across Europe. © 2018 Institute of Health Promotion and Education.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Abingdon: Routledge, 2018
Keywords
article, content analysis, Europe, human, human experiment, lifespan, major clinical study, mental health service, nursing education, skill, structured interview
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Pedagogy Work Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-38711 (URN)10.1080/14635240.2018.1431953 (DOI)000432278900003 ()2-s2.0-85041590563 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-01-08 Created: 2019-01-08 Last updated: 2019-01-08Bibliographically approved
Brockington, I., Butterworth, R., Glangeaud-Freudenthal, N. & Skärsäter, I. (2017). An international position paper on mother-infant (perinatal) mental health, with guidelines for clinical practice. Archives of Women's Mental Health, 20(1), 113-120
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An international position paper on mother-infant (perinatal) mental health, with guidelines for clinical practice
2017 (English)In: Archives of Women's Mental Health, ISSN 1434-1816, E-ISSN 1435-1102, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 113-120Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this paper is to set out informal, provisional and comprehensive but concise guidelines for mother-infant (perinatal) mental health (psychiatry), as an area of specialisation. It is informal in the sense that the authors are clinicians and researchers from many different nations, who share a common goal and vision, speaking on their own behalf and not with the backing of any authority or society. It is provisional in the expectation that it can be improved by criticism and new research findings. It is a comprehensive summary of the development of the specialty, its core knowledge and recommended investigations and interventions. It is concise (under 6,000 words, taking less than an hour to read) in order to increase readership and facilitate translation. No attempt has been made to parade the evidence for these suggestions, because the document would have been too long to translate, and for many to read. Instead, drafts were circulated for criticism by those included in the authorship, resulting in a consensus (finalised by the three principal authors), providing a framework to guide service provision, clinical practice and research. The full list of authors, from 33 nations, is given in the postscript. They include mother-infant (or parent-infant) and perinatal adult or child psychiatrists and those with a special interest; mother-infant, perinatal and forensic psychologists; psychiatric nurses; the founders of Postpartum Support International and the Association for Postnatal Illness; representatives of social work and obstetrics and the management of these services, and research scientists working in the field. © 2016 The Author(s)

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wien: Springer, 2017
Keywords
Mother-infant psychiatry, Perinatal mental health, clinical guidelines
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-32458 (URN)10.1007/s00737-016-0684-7 (DOI)27826750 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84994475500 (Scopus ID)
Note

Position-paper: Brockington, Butterworth, Glangeaud-Freudenthal & Skärsäter, with 65 other authors from 33 nations (2016).

Available from: 2016-11-21 Created: 2016-11-21 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-7838-6802

Search in DiVA

Show all publications