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Publications (10 of 34) Show all publications
Ploeg, J., Semsar-Kazerooni, E., Morales Medina, A. I., de Jongh, J. F. C., van de Sluis, J., Voronov, A., . . . van de Wouw, N. (2018). Cooperative Automated Maneuvering at the 2016 Grand Cooperative Driving Challenge. IEEE transactions on intelligent transportation systems (Print), 19(4), 1213-1226
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cooperative Automated Maneuvering at the 2016 Grand Cooperative Driving Challenge
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2018 (English)In: IEEE transactions on intelligent transportation systems (Print), ISSN 1524-9050, E-ISSN 1558-0016, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 1213-1226Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Cooperative adaptive cruise control and platooning are well-known applications in the field of cooperative automated driving. However, extension toward maneuvering is desired to accommodate common highway maneuvers, such as merging, and to enable urban applications. To this end, a layered control architecture is adopted. In this architecture, the tactical layer hosts the interaction protocols, describing the wireless information exchange to initiate the vehicle maneuvers, supported by a novel wireless message set, whereas the operational layer involves the vehicle controllers to realize the desired maneuvers. This hierarchical approach was the basis for the Grand Cooperative Driving Challenge (GCDC), which was held in May 2016 in The Netherlands. The GCDC provided the opportunity for participating teams to cooperatively execute a highway lane-reduction scenario and an urban intersection-crossing scenario. The GCDC was set up as a competition and, hence, also involving assessment of the teams' individual performance in a cooperative setting. As a result, the hierarchical architecture proved to be a viable approach, whereas the GCDC appeared to be an effective instrument to advance the field of cooperative automated driving. © Copyright 2017 IEEE - All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Piscataway: IEEE Press, 2018
Keywords
Cooperative driving, interaction protocol, controller design, vehicle platoons, wireless communications
National Category
Robotics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-35490 (URN)10.1109/TITS.2017.2765669 (DOI)2-s2.0-85035089916 (Scopus ID)
Projects
i-GAME
Available from: 2017-11-27 Created: 2017-11-27 Last updated: 2018-04-17Bibliographically approved
Ploeg, J., Englund, C., Nijmeijer, H., Semsar-Kazerooni, E., Shladover, S. E., Voronov, A. & van de Wouw, N. (2018). Guest Editorial Introduction to the Special Issue on the 2016 Grand Cooperative Driving Challenge. IEEE transactions on intelligent transportation systems (Print), 19(4), 1208-1212
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Guest Editorial Introduction to the Special Issue on the 2016 Grand Cooperative Driving Challenge
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2018 (English)In: IEEE transactions on intelligent transportation systems (Print), ISSN 1524-9050, E-ISSN 1558-0016, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 1208-1212Article in journal, Editorial material (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Cooperative driving is based on wireless communications between vehicles and between vehicles and roadside infrastructure, aiming for increased traffic flow and traffic safety, while decreasing fuel consumption and emissions. To support and accelerate the introduction of cooperative vehicles in everyday traffic, in 2011, nine international teams joined the Grand Cooperative Driving Challenge (GCDC). The challenge was to perform platooning, in which vehicles drive in road trains with short intervehicle distances. The results were reported in a Special Issue of IEEE Transactions on Intelligent Transportation Systems, published in September 2012 [item 1 in the Appendix]. © 2000-2011 IEEE.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Piscataway, NJ: IEEE, 2018
National Category
Robotics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-36630 (URN)10.1109/TITS.2018.2815103 (DOI)2-s2.0-85045020434 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-04-18 Created: 2018-04-18 Last updated: 2018-04-18Bibliographically approved
Rosenstatter, T. & Englund, C. (2018). Modelling the Level of Trust in a Cooperative Automated Vehicle Control System. IEEE transactions on intelligent transportation systems (Print), 19(4), 1237-1247
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Modelling the Level of Trust in a Cooperative Automated Vehicle Control System
2018 (English)In: IEEE transactions on intelligent transportation systems (Print), ISSN 1524-9050, E-ISSN 1558-0016, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 1237-1247Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Vehicle-to-vehicle communication is a key technology for achieving increased perception for automated vehicles, where the communication enables virtual sensing by means of sensors in other vehicles. In addition, this technology also allows detection and recognition of objects that are out-of-sight. This paper presents a trust system that allows a cooperative and automated vehicle to make more reliable and safe decisions. The system evaluates the current situation and generates a trust index indicating the level of trust in the environment, the ego vehicle, and the surrounding vehicles. This research goes beyond secure communication and concerns the verification of the received data on a system level. The results show that the proposed method is capable of correctly identifying various traffic situations and how the trust index is used while manoeuvring in a platoon merge scenario. © Copyright 2017 IEEE - All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Piscataway, NJ: IEEE Press, 2018
Keywords
GCDC 2016, autonomous driving, cooperative driving, vehicle-to-vehicle communication, trust, reliability
National Category
Robotics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-35483 (URN)10.1109/TITS.2017.2749962 (DOI)2-s2.0-85030752579 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-11-27 Created: 2017-11-27 Last updated: 2018-04-03Bibliographically approved
Englund, C., Didoff, J. & Wahlström, B. (2017). A new method for ground vehicle access control and situation awareness: experiences from a real-life implementation at an airport. In: : . Paper presented at 24th World Congress on Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS WC 2017), 29 October - 2 November, 2017, Montréal, Canada.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A new method for ground vehicle access control and situation awareness: experiences from a real-life implementation at an airport
2017 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

To improve safety in complex traffic situations, access control can be applied. This paper presents a generic vehicle access control method for improved situation awareness. The method concerns three main steps (i) zones definition (ii) rules to manage access and (iii) situation awareness based on realtime position monitoring. The proposed system consists of a server where the access zones and rules are stored and mobile units providing position data to the server and information to the driver. At the control center a client control unit is used to provide improved situation awareness by monitoring and visualizing the positions of the clients in the vehicles. The client in the control center is also utilized to give access to the clients in the vehicles that request access. The system has been demonstrated at an airport to grant access for ground vehicles to enter the runway and has since been developed into a commercial product by an industrial supplier. It was introduced at the World ATM Congress in Madrid in March of 2017. The server system is implemented as a cloud service in Microsoft Azure, the control client uses a WACOM CINTIQ touch screen computer for interaction and the vehicle clients are off-the-shelf Samsung Android units paired with Trimble R1GNSS receiver and 4G mobile communication between the server and the clients.

Keywords
Ground access control, C-ITS, Traffic management
National Category
Robotics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-35487 (URN)
Conference
24th World Congress on Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS WC 2017), 29 October - 2 November, 2017, Montréal, Canada
Available from: 2017-11-27 Created: 2017-11-27 Last updated: 2018-06-04Bibliographically approved
Chen, L. & Englund, C. (2017). Choreographing services for smart cities: smart traffic demonstration. In: Vehicular Technology Conference (VTC Spring), 2017 IEEE 85th: . Paper presented at Vehicular Technology Conference (VTC2017-Spring), 4-7 June 2017, Sydney, Australia. Sydney, Australia: IEEE
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Choreographing services for smart cities: smart traffic demonstration
2017 (English)In: Vehicular Technology Conference (VTC Spring), 2017 IEEE 85th, Sydney, Australia: IEEE, 2017Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

With the fifth generation (5G) communication technologies on the horizon, the society is rapidly transformed into a fully connected world. The Future Internet (FI) is foreseeable to consist of an infinite number of software components and things that coordinate with each other to enable different applications. Transport systems, as one of the most important systems in future smart cities, will embrace the connectivity, together with the fast development of cooperative and automated vehicles to enable smart traffic. To facilitate this transformation, a service choreography composition platform is under development to enable fast innovation and prototyping of choreography-based Internet of Things (IoT) applications by automatically synthesizing choreographies. Based on the method, a smart traffic application is developed and demonstrated.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sydney, Australia: IEEE, 2017
National Category
Communication Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-35482 (URN)10.1109/VTCSpring.2017.8108625 (DOI)
Conference
Vehicular Technology Conference (VTC2017-Spring), 4-7 June 2017, Sydney, Australia
Available from: 2017-11-27 Created: 2017-11-27 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Sprei, F., Englund, C., Habibi, S., Pettersson, S., Voronov, A., Wedlin, J. & Engdahl, H. (2017). Comparing electric vehicles and fossil driven vehicles in free-floating car sharing services. In: : . Paper presented at 5th European Battery, Hybrid and Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Congress, 14-16 March, 2017, Geneva, Switzerland.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comparing electric vehicles and fossil driven vehicles in free-floating car sharing services
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2017 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In recent years, free-floating car sharing (FFCS) services have been offered as a more flexible option compared to traditional car sharing. FFCS allows users to pick up and return cars anywhere within a specified area of a city. These can be either electric or fossil driven vehicles. We analyze the difference in usage of these two types of vehicles. The analysis is based on a dataset consisting of vehicle availability data sampled between 2014 and 2016 for 9 cities with EVs in the FFCS fleet. We find that there is no statistical difference in how EVs and fossil driven FFCS vehicles are used. When it comes to charging of EVs two main strategies are identified: widespread “slow charging” versus tailored fast-charging.

National Category
Other Electrical Engineering, Electronic Engineering, Information Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-35484 (URN)
Conference
5th European Battery, Hybrid and Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Congress, 14-16 March, 2017, Geneva, Switzerland
Available from: 2017-11-27 Created: 2017-11-27 Last updated: 2018-06-04Bibliographically approved
Habibi, S., Sprei, F., Englund, C., Pettersson, S., Voronov, A., Wedlin, J. & Engdahl, H. (2017). Comparison of free-floating car-sharing services in cities. In: : . Paper presented at European Council of Energy Efficient Economy (ECEEE) Summer Study, Presqu'île de Giens, France, 29 May–3 June, 2017. , Article ID 4-109-17.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comparison of free-floating car-sharing services in cities
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2017 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In recent years, free-floating car sharing services (FFCS) have been offered by many organizations as a more flexible option compared to traditional car sharing. FFCS allows users to pick up and return cars anywhere within a specified area of a city. FFCS can provide a high degree of utilization of vehicles and less usage of infrastructure in the form of parking lots and roads and thus has the potential to increase the efficiency of the transport sector. However, there is also a concern that these compete with other efficient modes of transport such as biking and public transport. The aim of this paper is to better understand how, when and where the vehicles are utilized through logged data of the vehicles movements. We have access to data collected on FFCS services in 22 cities in Europe and North America which allows us to compare the usage pattern in different cities and examine whether or not there are similar trends. In this paper, we use the collected data to compare the different cities based on utilization rate, length of trip and time of day that the trip is made. We find that the vehicle utilization rates differ between cities with Madrid and Hamburg having some of the highest utilization levels for the FFCS vehicles. The result form a first step of a better understanding on how these services are being used and can provide valuable input to local policy makers as well as future studies such as simulation models.

National Category
Other Electrical Engineering, Electronic Engineering, Information Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-35485 (URN)
Conference
European Council of Energy Efficient Economy (ECEEE) Summer Study, Presqu'île de Giens, France, 29 May–3 June, 2017
Note

Funding: The Swedish Energy Agency, Chalmers Area of Advance Transport & Chalmers Area of Advance Energy

Available from: 2017-11-27 Created: 2017-11-27 Last updated: 2017-11-28Bibliographically approved
Englund, C., Estrada, J., Jaaskelainen, J., Meisner, J., Satyavolu, S., Serna, F. & Sundararajan, S. (2017). Enabling Technologies for Road Vehicle Automation. In: Meyer G. & Beiker S. (Ed.), Road Vehicle Automation 4: (pp. 177-185). Leiden: VSP
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Enabling Technologies for Road Vehicle Automation
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2017 (English)In: Road Vehicle Automation 4 / [ed] Meyer G. & Beiker S., Leiden: VSP , 2017, p. 177-185Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Technology is to a large extent driving the development of road vehicle automation. This Chapter summarizes the general overall trends in the enabling technologies within this field that were discussed during the Enabling technologies for road vehicle automation breakout session at the Automated Vehicle Symposium 2016. With a starting point in six scenarios that have the potential to be deployed at an early stage, five different categories of emerging technologies are described: (a) positioning, localization and mapping (b) algorithms, deep learning techniques, sensor fusion guidance and control (c) hybrid communication (d) sensing and perception and (e) technologies for data ownership and privacy. It is found that reliability and extensive computational power are the two most common challenges within the emerging technologies. Furthermore, cybersecurity binds all technologies together as vehicles will be constantly connected. Connectivity allows both improved local awareness through vehicle-to-vehicle communication and it allows continuous deployment of new software and algorithms that constantly learns new unforeseen objects or scenarios. Finally, while five categories were individually considered, further holistic work to combine them in a systems concept would be the important next step toward implementation. © Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Leiden: VSP, 2017
Series
Lecture Notes in Mobility, ISSN 1573-4196
Keywords
Vehicle automation, GNSS, Deep learning, Local awareness, Hybrid communication, V2V
National Category
Robotics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-35486 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-60934-8_15 (DOI)978-3-319-60933-1 (ISBN)978-3-319-60934-8 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-11-27 Created: 2017-11-27 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
Habibovic, A., Andersson, J., Malmsten-Lundgren, V., Klingegård, M. & Englund, C. (2017). External vehicle interfaces for communication with other road users. In: Automated Vehicle Symposium: . Paper presented at AVS2017, Automated Vehicle Symposium, 11-13 July, 2017, San Francisco, USA.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>External vehicle interfaces for communication with other road users
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2017 (English)In: Automated Vehicle Symposium, 2017Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
National Category
Interaction Technologies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-35481 (URN)
Conference
AVS2017, Automated Vehicle Symposium, 11-13 July, 2017, San Francisco, USA
Available from: 2017-11-27 Created: 2017-11-27 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
Andersson, J., Habibovic, A., Klingegård, M., Englund, C. & Malmsten-Lundgren, V. (2017). Hello human, can you read my mind?. ERCIM News (109), 36-37
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hello human, can you read my mind?
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2017 (English)In: ERCIM News, ISSN 0926-4981, E-ISSN 1564-0094, no 109, p. 36-37Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

For safety reasons, autonomous vehicles should communicate their intent rather than explicitly invite people to act. At RISE Viktoria in Sweden, we believe this simple design principle will impact how autonomous vehicles are experienced in the future.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sophia Antipolis Cedex: European Research Consortium for Informatics and Mathematics (ERCIM), 2017
Keywords
Autonomous vehicles, automotive design, social experience, interaction design, user experience
National Category
Interaction Technologies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-35488 (URN)
Available from: 2017-11-27 Created: 2017-11-27 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-1043-8773

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