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Junggren, S. E., Elbæk, L. & Stambulova, N. (2018). Examining coaching practices and philosophy through the lens of organizational culture in a Danish high-performance swimming environment. International journal of sports science & coaching
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Examining coaching practices and philosophy through the lens of organizational culture in a Danish high-performance swimming environment
2018 (English)In: International journal of sports science & coaching, ISSN 1747-9541, E-ISSN 2048-397XArticle in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Interest in coaching and coaches, as well as coach–athlete relationships, has for a long time been a traditional and solid part of talent development literature. In recent times, talent development research has employed a holistic ecological approach and emphasized the important role of a broader athletic environment in athletes’ development and a constitutive role of organizational culture in the success of such an environment. This case study uses the holistic ecological perspective to examine coaching practices and philosophy through the lens of organizational culture in a Danish high performance swimming environment. The environment was selected based on its performance success but also because of its nontraditional organization compared to typical Danish swimming clubs. Data were generated from in-depth interviews with six coaches, 30 h of participant observation of training and meetings, and analysis of related documents. Thematic data analysis was guided by Schein’s model of organizational culture. The findings revealed the organizational culture that incorporates specific features of coaching practices and philosophy through cultural artifacts, espoused values, and basic assumptions. In the artifacts, coaching practices were explicit (e.g. flexible training groups and schedules) and philosophy implicit (e.g. ongoing flow of feedback), while in the espoused values, coaching philosophy was explicit (e.g. swimmers as whole persons, long-term development focus) and consistent with basic cultural assumptions(e.g. swimmers’ autonomy as a basis for progress). The study revealed that the cultural lens was helpful in exploring consistency between what coaches communicate about what they do (and how and why they do it) and what they actually did (and how they did it).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Sage Publications, 2018
Keywords
Coaching, coach–athlete centered coaching, organizational culture, swimming, talent development environment
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-37874 (URN)10.1177/1747954118796914 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-09-02 Created: 2018-09-02 Last updated: 2018-09-03
Ekengren, J., Stambulova, N., Johnson, U. & Carlsson, I.-M. (2018). Exploring career experiences of Swedish professional handball players: Consolidating firsthand information into an empirical career model. International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring career experiences of Swedish professional handball players: Consolidating firsthand information into an empirical career model
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, ISSN 1612-197X, E-ISSN 1557-251XArticle in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

The study was aimed at developing the empirical career model of Swedish professional handball players by means of exploring their career experiences in athletic and non-athletic developments through the lens of the holistic athletic career model. Eighteen Swedish professional handball players (nine men and nine women), who had recently terminated or were finishing their careers took part in semi-structured interviews about their careers from the beginning to the end with an interest in both athletic and non-athletic developments. Thematic analysis initially focused on identifying the handball career structure (i.e. stages and sub-stages). Then, the interviews were analysed inductively to identify shared themes in the players’ experiences relevant to each career stage. These themes were incorporated in the relevant stages, and the empirical career model of Swedish professional handball players (further – the empirical model) was finalised. The empirical model describes careers of Swedish handball players as having four athletic stages – initiation, development (with three sub-stages), mastery (with four sub-stages), and discontinuation – complemented by players’ psychological, psychosocial, academic/vocational, and financial developments. Each stage is also aligned with age markers and contains themes describing players’ career experiences from the holistic perspective. The empirical model contributes to contextualised career research and serves as a basis for developing career-long psychological support services in Swedish handball including player/coach/parent education organised by the Swedish Handball Federation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Taylor & Francis, 2018
Keywords
athletic career, empirical career model, handball, holistic developmental perspective
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-37469 (URN)10.1080/1612197X.2018.1486872 (DOI)
Funder
Swedish National Centre for Research in Sports, F2015-0018
Note

Funding: the Swedish Research Council for Sport Science, Swedish Handball Federation, and Halmstad University.

Available from: 2018-07-03 Created: 2018-07-03 Last updated: 2018-07-05
Ivarsson, A., Stambulova, N. & Johnson, U. (2018). Injury as a career transition: Experiences of a Swedish elite handball player. International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 16(4), 365-381
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Injury as a career transition: Experiences of a Swedish elite handball player
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, ISSN 1612-197X, E-ISSN 1557-251X, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 365-381Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This single-subject case study adopted a narrative approach and focused on two objectives: (a) to explore an athlete’s career development, including the impact of injuries, and (b) to explore that athlete’s injury experiences in detail. The participant was a 26-year-old former elite handball player who had experienced two major anterior cruciate ligament injuries during his career. To guide the research process from the formulation of its objectives to the interpretation of the participant’s narratives, we followed the narrative-oriented inquiry framework. To collect the participant’s stories, a low-structured interview guide consisting of open questions and requests for information about the participant’s handball career and injury experiences was used. The holistic content analysis allowed us to conceptualise injuries as career transition processes embedded in the athlete’s career development. Moreover, the participant’s narratives made it possible to identify four phases of injury transition and the distinct psychological content (demands, resources, barriers, and coping strategies) relevant to each of the four phases. Based on the results of the study, we anticipate that athletes, sport psychology consultants, coaches, and members of sport medicine teams can benefit from greater awareness of the specific demands and barriers relevant to each phase of the injury transition process. This knowledge can be further used to facilitate the development of adequate resources and coping strategies to help injured athletes navigate the rehabilitation process and successfully return to active sport involvement. © 2016 International Society of Sport Psychology

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York, NY: Taylor & Francis, 2018
Keywords
athlete career development, athletic injury, handball, narratives, single-subject case study, transition
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-31912 (URN)10.1080/1612197X.2016.1242149 (DOI)2-s2.0-84991035213 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-09-01 Created: 2016-09-01 Last updated: 2018-08-21Bibliographically approved
Ryba, T., Schinke, R. J., Stambulova, N. & Elbe, A.-M. (2018). ISSP position stand: Transnationalism, mobility, and acculturation in and through sport. International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 16(5), 520-534
Open this publication in new window or tab >>ISSP position stand: Transnationalism, mobility, and acculturation in and through sport
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, ISSN 1612-197X, E-ISSN 1557-251X, Vol. 16, no 5, p. 520-534Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The historically unprecedented pace of internationalising sport industry and transnational movement of athletic talent in the last 20 years has heightened the need for developing new competencies in research and daily practice of sport psychology professionals. While academic literature in cultural sport psychology and praxis has been increasing, sport professionals and local organisations seem to give scant time and resources to stay abreast of complex social changes in transnational industry and to the development of cultural competencies. Stemming from the continuing need for qualified athletic personnel to support transitioning athletes and to achieve intercultural effectiveness in daily practices, our objectives in this position statement are to critically review and analyse the growing scholarship pertinent to various forms of transnational mobility and acculturation of athletic migrants, and subsequently provide recommendations for further use in research and applied contexts. © 2017 International Society of Sport Psychology

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Taylor & Francis, 2018
Keywords
migrant athletes, transnational mobility, cultural transition, critical acculturation, integration
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-34413 (URN)10.1080/1612197X.2017.1280836 (DOI)2-s2.0-85009951464 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-06-29 Created: 2017-06-29 Last updated: 2018-09-17Bibliographically approved
Henriksen, K., Storm, L. K., Stambulova, N., Pyrdol, N. & Larsen, C. H. (2018). Successful and Less Successful Interventions with Youth and Senior Athletes: Insights from Expert Sport Psychology Practitioners. Journal of Clinical Sport Psychology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Successful and Less Successful Interventions with Youth and Senior Athletes: Insights from Expert Sport Psychology Practitioners
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Sport Psychology, ISSN 1932-9261Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

This study is focused on reflections of expert sport psychology practitioners about their interventions with competitive youth and senior elite athletes. Two objectives include: (1) to identify key structural components used by practitioners to describe sport psychology interventions and integrate them into an empirical framework, and (2) to analyze the practitioners’ experiences in regard of their successful and less successful interventions in competitive youth and elite senior sport contexts using the empirical framework. We conducted semi-structured interviews with twelve internationally recognized sport psychology practitioners (SPPs) and analyzed the data thematically. The empirical framework derived from the SPPs’ accounts contains eight structural components integrated into two categories: (1) the content and focus (with three components, e.g., adaptation of content), and (2) the organization and delivery of interventions (with five components, e.g., initiation and assessment of athletes’ needs). Using the empirical framework we found differences between successful and less successful interventions and between youth and senior contexts in terms of needs assessment, adaptation and breadth of content, athlete-practitioner relationship, and intervention settings. The empirical framework might inform SPPs in their efforts to design, implement, and evaluate their services in these two contexts.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Champaign: Human Kinetics, 2018
Keywords
Applied sport psychology interventions, expert practitioners, empirical framework, youth sport context, senior sport context
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-35828 (URN)10.1123/jcsp.2017-0005 (DOI)
Note

Funding: Team Denmark

Available from: 2017-12-13 Created: 2017-12-13 Last updated: 2018-09-03
Franck, A., Stambulova, N. & Ivarsson, A. (2018). Swedish athletes' adjustment patterns in the junior-to-senior transition. International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 16(4), 398-414
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Swedish athletes' adjustment patterns in the junior-to-senior transition
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, ISSN 1612-197X, E-ISSN 1557-251X, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 398-414Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The specific objectives of this study were: (a) to identify adjustment patterns in the JST based on athletes’ dynamics of adjustment during a two-and-a–half-year period, and (b) to describe the athletes’ demographic, personal and transitional characteristics at the beginning of the JST that were related to the different adjustment patterns. This quantitative longitudinal study consisted of five measurements conducted approximately every six months over a two-and-a-half-year period. One instrument was used to measure the transition variables and three instruments to measure personal characteristics. In the first measurement, 101 club-based Swedish athletes with the mean age of 16.51 (SD = 1.32) took part. The latent profile analysis (LPA) on athletes’ perceived degree of adjustment provided three profiles with different patterns in the JST. Profile 1 had a progressive adjustment pattern, whereas the second profile had a regressive adjustment pattern, and the third profile had a sustainable adjustment pattern. The descriptive statistics and Cohen’s d indicated that there were differences (with variation in magnitude) between the three profiles at the first measurement in terms of how athletes perceived different transitional characteristics. Keeping a primary focus on sport (but also having attention to other spheres of life), high athletic identity and motivation to reach senior level were characteristics relevant for both progressive and sustainable adjustment patterns. © 2016 International Society of Sport Psychology

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York, NY: Taylor & Francis, 2018
Keywords
career transition, junior-to-senior, adjustment patterns, longitudinal design
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-32255 (URN)10.1080/1612197X.2016.1256339 (DOI)2-s2.0-84996671095 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-10-21 Created: 2016-10-21 Last updated: 2018-08-21Bibliographically approved
Bonhomme, J., Seanor, M., Schinke, R. J. & Stambulova, N. (2018). The career trajectories of two world champion boxers: interpretive thematic analysis of media stories. Sport in Society: Cultures, Media, Politics, Commerce
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The career trajectories of two world champion boxers: interpretive thematic analysis of media stories
2018 (English)In: Sport in Society: Cultures, Media, Politics, Commerce, ISSN 1743-0437, E-ISSN 1743-0445Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Athlete development can be described through transitions that mark turning phases throughout athletes’ careers. Our authors explored media data to unpack the career developments of two prominent world champion boxers from their early lives to world championship status. Employing thematic analysis, five themes were identified: (1) weathering hardships of early life (subthemes: the rough life of an innercity kid; abject poverty in war-torn Philippines), (2) entry into sport (subthemes: groomed to fight; boxing to escape poverty), (3) amateur experience (subthemes: Olympic medallist en route to the pros; struggling amateur with dreams of greatness), (4) launching a professional career (impressive American prospect; a charismatic unpolished slugger) and (5) capturing a world title (subthemes: the much-anticipated world champion; the unexpected world champion). This exploration augments our understanding of how two worldrenowned boxers’ career developments were represented through sport media and interpreted by the researchers, suggesting parallel pathways for future career boxers and those who work with them. © 2018 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Abingdon: Routledge, 2018
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-37879 (URN)10.1080/17430437.2018.1463727 (DOI)2-s2.0-85046425641 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-09-02 Created: 2018-09-02 Last updated: 2018-09-03
Franck, A. & Stambulova, N. (2018). The junior to senior transition: a narrative analysis of the pathways of two Swedish athletes. Qualitative Research in Sport, Exercise and Health
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The junior to senior transition: a narrative analysis of the pathways of two Swedish athletes
2018 (English)In: Qualitative Research in Sport, Exercise and Health, ISSN 2159-676X, E-ISSN 2159-6778Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

There are as many careers with various pathways as there are athletes, and the interest in the junior-to-senior transition (JST) stems from its particular importance for athletes’ lives when aiming for the senior elite levels of their sports (Stambulova 1994, 2009). This study is a follow-up of the quantitative longitudinal study that investigated the JST process in Swedish sport club athletes (Authors et al. 2016a, 2016b). The aim of this study was to explore two athletes’ (pseudonyms Erik, the swimmer, and Jessika, the tennis player) JST transition pathways, emphasising psychosocial factors that were perceived as facilitating and debilitating the transition process. Narrative type interviews were conducted, and the stories were analysed using the holistic-form structural analysis (Smith 2016). The analysis provided a central storyline (performance narrative) that is similar for both athletes, and two side storylines: Erik’s effort and relationship narrative and Jessika’s injury and reorientation narrative. They shared psychosocial factors that were perceived as facilitating the transition process, including family, coaches and sport club environment. For Erik, the debilitating factors were the negative changes in the group and a poor relationship with the new coach. The debilitating factors that influenced Jessika’s JST were the decrease/loss of financial support and the challenge of facing younger opponents against whom she felt she shouldn’t lose when making a comeback after an injury. After the JST, both Erik and Jessika changed their tracks in life, terminated their athletic careers and focused on pursuing higher education qualifications. © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Abingdon: Routledge, 2018
Keywords
career transition, junior-to-senior, narrative, psychosocial factors, swimming, tennis
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-37877 (URN)10.1080/2159676X.2018.1479979 (DOI)2-s2.0-85048360113 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-09-02 Created: 2018-09-02 Last updated: 2018-09-03
Franck, A. & Stambulova, N. (2017). A Swedish female basketball player’s junior-to-seniortransition: A narrative case study. In: Krister Hertting & Urban Johnson (Ed.), Proceedings of the Nordic Sport Science Conference – ‘The Double-Edged Sword of Sport: Health Promotion Versus Unhealthy Environments’: . Paper presented at Nordic Sport Science Conference – ‘The Double-Edged Sword of Sport: Health Promotion Versus Unhealthy Environments’, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden, 22-23 November, 2017 (pp. 32-33). Halmstad: Halmstad University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Swedish female basketball player’s junior-to-seniortransition: A narrative case study
2017 (English)In: Proceedings of the Nordic Sport Science Conference – ‘The Double-Edged Sword of Sport: Health Promotion Versus Unhealthy Environments’ / [ed] Krister Hertting & Urban Johnson, Halmstad: Halmstad University Press, 2017, p. 32-33Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Halmstad: Halmstad University Press, 2017
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-35832 (URN)
Conference
Nordic Sport Science Conference – ‘The Double-Edged Sword of Sport: Health Promotion Versus Unhealthy Environments’, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden, 22-23 November, 2017
Available from: 2017-12-13 Created: 2017-12-13 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Stambulova, N. (2017). Athletes’ relationship crises: Case examples and resolution strategies. In: Conference Abstracts: 32nd Annual Conference AASP2017, Orlando, FL, October 18-21. Paper presented at The 32nd Annual Conference of the Association for Applied Sport Psychology (AASP), October 18-21, 2017, Orlando, FL, USA (pp. 130-130). Indianapolis: Association for Applied Sport Psychology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Athletes’ relationship crises: Case examples and resolution strategies
2017 (English)In: Conference Abstracts: 32nd Annual Conference AASP2017, Orlando, FL, October 18-21, Indianapolis: Association for Applied Sport Psychology , 2017, p. 130-130Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

A body of knowledge exists in sport psychology about the dynamic social context of athletes’ development and the roles of the people involved (Jowett & Lavallee, 2007; Jowett & Poczwardowski, 2006). In many senses, other people (coaches, managers, parents, peers, opponents, sport psychology practitioners, etc.) make athletes’ careers possible and meaningful (Jowett, 2003; Stambulova, 2010). Therefore, harmonious relationships are key pre-conditions for successful careers, whereas problematic relationships often lead to deterioration in athletes’ well-being, performance, and non-sport life (Sandström, Linnér, & Stambulova, 2016). In this presentation athletes’ problematic relationships will be analyzed from a career transition perspective that is as crisis phases in their careers that athletes can’t cope with on their own and need proper interventions. One educational tool that can be used in working with athletes experiencing relationship crises is the mobilization model of counseling in crisis-transitions (Stambulova, 2011) that is aimed at helping the clients to analyze crisis situations, find possible ways to cope, and further develop their social and other coping skills. In this presentation a real case involving a young talented female swimmer who could not balance contrasting expectations of her coach, parents, and her boyfriend in term of her athletic role, and consequently experienced frustration and disharmony in the relationships with all of them will be shared and analyzed using the mobilization model. The analysis will follow six steps, including: (1) collecting and sorting out the client’s information, (2) identifying, prioritizing and articulating the problem issues, (3) analyzing the current status of the client’s coping resources and barriers, (4) discussing the transition alternatives and stimulating the client to make the strategic decision, (5) goal setting and planning relevant to the decision made, and (6) concluding and providing follow-ups. © 2017 by the Association for Applied Sport Psychology 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Indianapolis: Association for Applied Sport Psychology, 2017
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-35833 (URN)978-0-9855310-6-5 (ISBN)
Conference
The 32nd Annual Conference of the Association for Applied Sport Psychology (AASP), October 18-21, 2017, Orlando, FL, USA
Available from: 2017-12-13 Created: 2017-12-13 Last updated: 2018-01-29Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-6198-0784

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