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Stambulova, N., Wylleman, P., Torregrossa, M., Erpič, S. C., Vitali, F., de Brandt, K., . . . Ramis, Y. (2024). FEPSAC Position Statement: Athletes’ dual careers in the European context. Psychology of Sport And Exercise, 71, Article ID 102572.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>FEPSAC Position Statement: Athletes’ dual careers in the European context
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2024 (English)In: Psychology of Sport And Exercise, ISSN 1469-0292, E-ISSN 1878-5476, Vol. 71, article id 102572Article, review/survey (Refereed) In press
Abstract [en]

The aim of this FEPSAC Position Statement is to summarize current knowledge about athletes’ dual careers (DCs) in the European context and propose recommendations for future DC research, practice, and policy. Inspired by the European Union’s Guidelines on Dual Careers of Athletes (European Commission, 2012), researchers, practitioners, and policy makers collaborated over the last decade to create the European DC discourse as a context-informed and negotiated body of DC knowledge. In this paper, we proceed from analyzing this body of knowledge using recent review papers and European DC psychological research projects to formulating seven postulates summarizing DC research findings on factors influencing athletes in their striving for DC excellence. These factors include (1) context, (2) pathways and transitions, (3) challenges, (4) resources and coping, (5) support and empowerment, (6) student–athletes’ mental health, and (7) DC development environments. In the final section, we acknowledge the contributions of European DC discourse in serving athletes in their pursuit of DC excellence and European DC culture. We also provide a critical discussion on DC knowledge gaps and, on behalf of FEPSAC, offer recommendations for DC research, practice, and policy in Europe. © 2023 The Authors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2024
Keywords
Dual career excellence, Dual career development environments, European dual career culture, European dual career discourse, Holistic perspective on athletes’ development
National Category
Applied Psychology Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Health Innovation
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-52369 (URN)10.1016/j.psychsport.2023.102572 (DOI)38030052 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2024-01-05 Created: 2024-01-05 Last updated: 2024-01-05Bibliographically approved
Stambulova, N. (2024). Helping Athletes Cope with Developmental Crises (2ed.). In: Tod, David; Hodge, Ken; Krane, Vikki (Ed.), Routledge Handbook of Applied Sport Psychology: A Comprehensive Guide for Students and Practitioners (pp. 357-367). Abingdon: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Helping Athletes Cope with Developmental Crises
2024 (English)In: Routledge Handbook of Applied Sport Psychology: A Comprehensive Guide for Students and Practitioners / [ed] Tod, David; Hodge, Ken; Krane, Vikki, Abingdon: Routledge, 2024, 2, p. 357-367Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This chapter aims to define crisis-transitions, explain why they happen, and share how to help athletes to cope with them. There are several lines of research that provide findings deemed useful for helping clients in crisis-transitions. Research on less successful transition coping revealed that, for transitioning athletes, additional barriers may arise when some of their identities are centralized at the expense of others. Helping athletes to prevent and/or cope with crisis-transitions is a part of supporting their striving for career excellence. Theoretical frameworks that may help practitioners approach counseling in crisis-transitions include the athletic career transition model, the holistic athletic career model, and the lifespan model of developmental challenge. Athlete-career trajectories are influenced by their success in coping with various kinds of career transitions and developmental crises. Using the holistic and developmental perspectives, encouraging athletes to share stories, empathetic listening, aiding clients’ understanding of the crisis-situation, and related coping alternatives are key aspects of success in crisis-transition counseling.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Abingdon: Routledge, 2024 Edition: 2
Series
Advances in Leisure Studies, ISSN 2644-0288, E-ISSN 2644-027X
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences Applied Psychology
Research subject
Health Innovation
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-52371 (URN)10.4324/9781003173588-41 (DOI)2-s2.0-85167751114 (Scopus ID)9781003173588 (ISBN)9781032002972 (ISBN)9781032002989 (ISBN)
Available from: 2024-01-05 Created: 2024-01-05 Last updated: 2024-01-05Bibliographically approved
Book, R. T., Henriksen, K., Stambulova, N. & Mathorne, O. W. (2024). “We are their last chance”: A case study of a college basketball environment in an American underserved community. Journal of Applied Sport Psychology, 36(1), 1-23
Open this publication in new window or tab >>“We are their last chance”: A case study of a college basketball environment in an American underserved community
2024 (English)In: Journal of Applied Sport Psychology, ISSN 1041-3200, E-ISSN 1533-1571, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 1-23Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this case study we used the holistic ecological approach (HEA) to examine an underserved athletic talent development environment (UATDE) in the United States to: (1) holistically describe a successful UATDE—in this case a community college basketball program known as Best Community College, and (2) explore factors contributing to the success of developing athletes that repeatedly earn athletic scholarships. Data were collected via in-situ observations, document analysis, and interviews (both formal and informal) with coaches, players, and other key stakeholders. The findings were summarized in two empirical models: (1) the UATDE empirical model of Best Community College, and (2) the underserved environment success factors (UESF) empirical model of Best Community College. The operation of the UATDE was significantly influenced by the underserved community in which it was embedded, translating to a lack of financial and human resources, while the team’s roster was occupied by athletically talented, but psychosocially vulnerable players. These challenges were overcome, in part, by a dedicated support team as well as the cultural paradigm established by the head coach as a cultural leader. Conclusively, this case study constitutes an important supplementation to the evolving body of literature utilizing the HEA, highlighting how an environmental context can shift the focus of athletic talent development when we consider the concept of a UATDE. Lay summary: This case study explored a successful community college basketball program located within an underserved American community. While the investigation concludes that socioeconomic challenges in the surrounding community created significant barriers to success, the head coach and support team were able to help players succeed in sport and life.IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE Those working in community colleges must be made aware of issues stemming from where the environment is located and also related to the backgrounds of the prospective athletes. Community college sports programs are an important steppingstone to life and sport success for the athletes they serve but a lack of human and financial resources are a large barrier to success that can be counteracted by strong cultural leaders within the sport program. UATDEs must be considered a unique context and practitioners should let this context inform their practice, for example, by supporting the staff as much as the athletes, supporting the head coach in developing a functional cultural paradigm, and supporting the athletes’ broader psychosocial development and not only their performance. © 2023 Association for Applied Sport Psychology.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Philadelphia, PA: Routledge, 2024
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Health Innovation
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-50145 (URN)10.1080/10413200.2023.2183281 (DOI)000939547500001 ()2-s2.0-85149306292 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-03-21 Created: 2023-03-21 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Samuel, R. D., Stambulova, N., Galily, Y. & Tenenbaum, G. (2023). Adaptation to change: a meta-model of adaptation in sport. International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 1-25
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adaptation to change: a meta-model of adaptation in sport
2023 (English)In: International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, ISSN 1612-197X, E-ISSN 1557-251X, p. 1-25Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

The aim of this paper is twofold: (1) to integrate several theoretical perspectives into a novel Meta-model of Adaption in Sport (MAS model) and (2) to support the MAS model with a narrative literature review on change-provoking events and related adaptation processes, factors involved, and outcomes. The MAS model is designed to account for two potential tracks of adaptation – fast and prolonged – that are situated along the continuum of adaptation experiences in sport. In each track, sport performers experience various types of sport-related events (i.e., acute events or change events) that are associated with specific sets of demands and perceptions related to self-efficacy beliefs and challenge-threat appraisal. Accordingly, the performer responds to these events by using the mechanisms which determine his/her adaptation process and outcomes. We present a narrative review of the literature related to both adaptation tracks that provide empirical support to the MAS model and conclude by offering reflections on the MAS model and its potential applications in sport psychology research and practice.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Taylor & Francis, 2023
Keywords
Athletic career, change event, scoping, transitions, performance, decision-making
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Health Innovation
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-50146 (URN)10.1080/1612197x.2023.2168726 (DOI)000925340800001 ()2-s2.0-85147596902 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-03-21 Created: 2023-03-21 Last updated: 2024-01-08Bibliographically approved
Henriksen, K. & Stambulova, N. (2023). The social environment of talent development in youth sport. Frontiers in Sports and Active Living, 5, Article ID 1127151.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The social environment of talent development in youth sport
2023 (English)In: Frontiers in Sports and Active Living, E-ISSN 2624-9367, Vol. 5, article id 1127151Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

During the last decade, talent identification and development research that favours an individual perspective has been complemented by a focus on young athletes' social environments, termed “athletic talent development environments” (ATDEs). Two major lines of research have created a foundation for an ecological vision of talent development as the mutual accommodation between athletes and their ATDEs and of career development as an athlete's journey through various athletic and non-athletic environments. The Talent Development Environment Questionnaire allows the quantitative screening of athletes' environments, while the holistic ecological approach (HEA) promotes in-depth qualitative case studies of ATDEs. In this chapter, we focus mainly on the HEA, including: (a) two models that combine to illustrate an ATDE; (b) a summary of empirical case studies of successful environments in various sports and countries, culminating in a set of shared features of ATDEs that promote athletes' wellbeing and athletic and personal development; (c) an overview of recent trends within HEA (e.g. interorganisational collaboration in talent development) and (d) recommendations for coaches and sport psychology consultants, emphasising the importance of integrating efforts across the whole environment and building strong and coherent organisational cultures. In the discussion, we elaborate on developing the HEA discourse and point to future challenges for researchers and practitioners. © 2023 Henriksen and Stambulova

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lausanne: Frontiers Research Foundation, 2023
Keywords
athletic talent, athletic talent development environment, ecological psycholgy, holistic ecological approach, sport environment, youth sport
National Category
Applied Psychology
Research subject
Health Innovation
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-51231 (URN)10.3389/fspor.2023.1127151 (DOI)000939527200001 ()2-s2.0-85149412638 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-07-07 Created: 2023-07-07 Last updated: 2024-01-08Bibliographically approved
Henriksen, K., Stambulova, N., Storm, L. K. & Schinke, R. (2023). Towards an ecology of athletes’ career transitions: conceptualization and working models. International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Towards an ecology of athletes’ career transitions: conceptualization and working models
2023 (English)In: International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, ISSN 1612-197X, E-ISSN 1557-251XArticle in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

In the present paper, we introduce an ecological view of career transitions. We consider an athlete’s development as a journey through various athletic and non-athletic environments that support their striving for career excellence. On this journey, an athlete experiences a multitude of environments and transitions from one environment (e.g., one club, one country or one sport) to another. To develop this understanding, we introduce the concept of a transition environment defined as a dynamic and temporary system that bridges the setting that an athlete is transitioning from and to. We also suggest two working models that in unison can work as a roadmap for transition environment research and practice. The transition environment (TE) model helps to describe the TE and the transition environment success factor (TE-SF) model helps to understand why certain TEs are more successful than others supporting athletes in transition. The models can be used by researchers studying specific transition environments to understand how such environments facilitate or hinder transitions, and by practitioners (coaches, managers, sport psychologists) to support athletes’ transitions by improving their TEs. We hope the idea of an ecology of athlete transitions will find its way into empirical studies of different types of transitions (e.g., to another sport, to another level in sport, to another club or to another country) in multiple cultural contexts and contribute to the development of career-long psychological support services. © 2023 International Society of Sport Psychology.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York, NY: Taylor & Francis, 2023
Keywords
applied sport psychology, Athlete career, career transition, holistic ecological approach, sport environment
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Health Innovation
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-51461 (URN)10.1080/1612197X.2023.2213105 (DOI)000993478000001 ()2-s2.0-85159896538 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-08-29 Created: 2023-08-29 Last updated: 2024-01-08Bibliographically approved
Linnér, L., Stambulova, N., Franck, A. & Lindahl, K. (2023). What Matters the Most? Factors Contributing to the Successful Dual Career Coping of Swedish University Student-Athletes. In: : . Paper presented at SVEBI (Svensk Förening för Beteende- och Samhällsvetenskaplig Idrottsforskning) årskonferens, Göteborg, Sverige, 23-24 november, 2023.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What Matters the Most? Factors Contributing to the Successful Dual Career Coping of Swedish University Student-Athletes
2023 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Introduction and Aim 

Research reveals that athletes might have short- and long-term benefits of combining sport and education, that is, pursuing a dual career (DC) pathway (Stambulova & Wylleman, 2019). To facilitate this challenging pathway, the Swedish Sports Confederation (2018) has developed the Swedish national DC guidelines for the recently established system of National Sports Universities (RIUs) and Elite-sports Friendly Universities (EVLs). The Swedish Sports Confederation invited Halmstad University DC research group to conduct an annual national survey to monitor the DC experiences of RIU/EVL student-athletes for three years (2020-2022). In this presentation we will share the findings from three years of data collection across RIUs/EVLs with an emphasis on what factors contributed to the successful DC coping of Swedish university student-athletes. 

Method

Officially recognized RIU/EVL student-athletes received an invitation by e-mail to take part in the study by liaisons at each RIU/EVL. Across the years we sampled 561 participants (54% female) with a mean age of 23.82 (SD = 3.35). The participants represented all universities in the system (n = 22), 54 sport federations and studied across a variety of educations with an average study pace of 87%.  

The survey was developed for this project based on the Swedish national DC guidelines, the Dual Career Survey (Stambulova et al., 2015) and relevant existing and validated instruments, all informed by national and international DC research (e.g., Brown et al., 2015; Linnér et al., 2019) and findings from two Erasmus+ sports projects: the Gold in Education and Elite Sport project (GEES; e.g., De Brandt et al., 2018) and the Ecology of Dual Career project (ECO-DC; e.g., Henriksen et al., 2020). The instrument covered (a) demographic information, (b) DC-experiences including coping with perceived challenges, the Dual Career Competency Questionnaire for Athletes (De Brandt et al., 2018), health and wellbeing (e.g., Besèr et al., 2014), DC support, and need-supportive interpersonal behaviours from key support providers through the Interpersonal Behaviours Questionnaire (Rocchi et al., 2017), and (c) overall satisfaction with RIU/EVL and DC. 

Results 

Using a classification and regression tree analysis (Machuca et al., 2017) we explored associations between factors related to successful DC coping. Findings of this study indicated that the key factor for coping with the DC is student-athletes’ organization and planning competence (e.g., plan in advance and use time efficiently) and that stakeholders DC support and competence-needs-supportive behaviors can compensate student-athletes’ lack of organization and planning competence. Findings also show that the combination of factors leading to least successful coping is low organization and planning competence in combination with low emotional competence (e.g., stress management). 

Conclusions

Previous research has revealed a plethora of factors and competences (e.g., De Brandt et al., 2018) related to student-athletes’ DC success. This study helps support providers in suggesting what matters the most. These findings provide important implications for how DC support can be improved to facilitate sustainable DCs of athletes at RIUs/EVLs in Sweden. Among such implications is the importance of monitoring students-athletes’ ability to plan and, when necessary, provide DC support to facilitate development of such a competence. 

National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Health Innovation, M4HP
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-52130 (URN)
Conference
SVEBI (Svensk Förening för Beteende- och Samhällsvetenskaplig Idrottsforskning) årskonferens, Göteborg, Sverige, 23-24 november, 2023
Available from: 2023-11-28 Created: 2023-11-28 Last updated: 2023-11-30Bibliographically approved
Stambulova, N. & Harwood, C. (2022). A “Dual Career”: Combining Sport and Studies. Frontiers for Young Minds, 10
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A “Dual Career”: Combining Sport and Studies
2022 (English)In: Frontiers for Young Minds, E-ISSN 2296-6846, Vol. 10Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

School-aged athletes face the need to balance competitive sports and their studies. In doing so they follow what is called a dual-career pathway. Both pursuits take time and effort, both are expected to lead to success, and either could lead to a life-long career. A dual-career pathway begins when children start to play sports and might continue throughout the school years and beyond. Research shows that it is beneficial to combine sport and studies, but it is also challenging. How can kids optimally juggle their sport, studies, social, and private lives? How do they gain the benefits of a dual career and avoid harming their prospects in sport or school? This article explains what a dual career is, why it is important, and why it is difficult. It also describes the skills and strategies for coping with dual-career challenges and presents tips from researchers to achieve success in dual-career pursuits. © 2022 Stambulova and Harwood

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lausanne: Frontiers Research Foundation, 2022
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-50113 (URN)10.3389/frym.2022.692422 (DOI)
Available from: 2023-03-21 Created: 2023-03-21 Last updated: 2024-01-05Bibliographically approved
Book, R. T., Henriksen, K., Stambulova, N. & Storm, L. K. (2022). “All they have seen is a model for failure:” Stakeholder’s perspectives on athletic talent development in American underserved communities. Journal of Applied Sport Psychology, 34(6), 1037-1057
Open this publication in new window or tab >>“All they have seen is a model for failure:” Stakeholder’s perspectives on athletic talent development in American underserved communities
2022 (English)In: Journal of Applied Sport Psychology, ISSN 1041-3200, E-ISSN 1533-1571, Vol. 34, no 6, p. 1037-1057Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study explores the primary challenges faced and strategies implemented in underserved athletic talent development environments (UATDEs) in the United States and examines how developing within such environments impacts athletes once they reach the college and professional levels of sports. Thirteen stakeholders (M = 10, F = 3), who had significant experience working with professional and youth athletes from underserved communities, participated in the study. Unstructured interviews lasting slightly over an hour (M = 74 min) were analyzed using the principles of reflexive thematic analysis and the process uncovered two categories: shared features of school-based UATDEs in the United States and the ripple effects of trauma which were used to structure the findings. Within these two categories, primary themes were presented relating to the challenges observed and strategies implemented to overcome these obstacles in UATDEs as well as how developing within a UATDE can influence an athlete upon leaving the environment. The study found that stakeholders (i.e., administrators, coaches, etc.) who work within UATDEs must be aware of the inherent challenges that the environment creates and how to best support the athletes who require increased psychosocial developmental attention. Further, the same stakeholders also need to be supported in their work. Finally, when athletes from UATDEs leave the environment, stress-inducing traumatic events of their formative years may stay with them requiring that stakeholders at the university and professional levels provide support to those that need it as talent can suffer from trauma. Lay summary: This study explored the perceptions of stakeholders who work with athletes in or coming from American underserved communities. The consensus is that significant challenges exist for coaches working in such environments and athletes developing in these circumstances will likely carry emotional trauma with them during their life and athletic careers.Implications for practice Applied practitioners working in UATDEs must prioritize the psychosocial development of their athletes as much, if not more, than athletic development. Organizations, such as AASP and ISSP must educate (e.g., through conferences, seminars, webinars, etc.) stakeholders and coaches working in UATDEs of the potential challenges faced and resources required to excel in such environments. Applied practitioners in university and professional sport must understand that athletes coming from UATDEs will need additional and specialized support focused upon, for example, the transition to a new environment or managing the ripple effects of trauma. © 2021 Association for Applied Sport Psychology.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Philadelphia: Routledge, 2022
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-46002 (URN)10.1080/10413200.2021.1958953 (DOI)000686016400001 ()2-s2.0-85113165070 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-12-02 Created: 2021-12-02 Last updated: 2023-01-12Bibliographically approved
Linnér, L., Stambulova, N. & Henriksen, K. (2022). Facilitating student-athletes’ dual career transition: A Scandinavian university case study. Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology, 11(2), 107-123
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Facilitating student-athletes’ dual career transition: A Scandinavian university case study
2022 (English)In: Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology, ISSN 2157-3905, E-ISSN 2157-3913, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 107-123Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study combines the holistic ecological and holistic developmental approaches through a mixed-methods intrinsic case study with a convergent design to explore how a Dual Career (DC) Development Environment (DCDE) facilitated student-athletes’ transition to a Scandinavian university. The case was explored through multiple sources of data inspired by the research methodology in the holistic ecological approach and the DC-Environment Success Factors (DC-ESF) working model. Semi-structured interviews, with student-athletes and support providers, and documents analysis were complemented by a quantitative monitoring of the student-athletes’ transition experiences. Findings are presented in a joint display by merging the qualitative and quantitative data in an empirical version of the DC-ESF model. The empirical model summarizes the case by situating the environment in student-athletes’ development and showing a challenging transition with athletic and non-athletic demands, and a well-coordinated and supportive environment with a mission of a balanced and synchronized whole and targeting empowerment of the whole person. The student-athletes developed their DC competences and a holistic attitude to development, improved in sport and study, and in their ability to balance their DC. This study contributes to the literature by bridging the gap between transition and environment research. By integrating the two approaches the study explicitly shows the fit between the student-athletes’ needs and the environment’s support leading to the conclusion that effective DCDEs works to meet student-athletes’ needs by helping them to develop DC competencies to create and maintain an optimal DC balance. © 2021. American Psychological Association

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Washington, DC: American Psychological Association (APA), 2022
Keywords
Dual career development environment, holistic developmental approach, holistic ecological approach, student-athlete, transition, university
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-45710 (URN)10.1037/spy0000275 (DOI)000733074300001 ()2-s2.0-85119300774 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-10-05 Created: 2021-10-05 Last updated: 2022-08-25Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-6198-0784

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