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Danielsson, M. (2018). Class conditioning and class positioning in young people's everyday life with digital media: Exploring new forms of class-making in the Swedish media welfare state. In: : . Paper presented at 7th European Communication Conference - Centres and Peripheries: Communication, Research, Translation, Lugano, Switzerland, October 31-November 3, 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Class conditioning and class positioning in young people's everyday life with digital media: Exploring new forms of class-making in the Swedish media welfare state
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Sweden is regularly highlighted as one of the most egalitarian and wired countries in the world. While this might be correct in the light of international statistical comparisons, there is also another side to the story. Despite years of policy reforms designed in order to counter the emergence and solidification of digital inequalities, this paper shows that economic and cultural forces are still at work structuring people’s internet access and digital media use along the lines of preexisting social divisions.

Drawing on Bourdieusian theory and qualitative interview data from two different research projects, the paper specifically sheds light on the ways in which social class shapes the conditions and configurations of digital media practice in the everyday life of young people in Sweden. In particular, Bourdieu’s conceptualization of social classes as defined both intrinsically (by their material conditions of existence) and relationally (by their position in relation to each other) is invoked in order to explore and elucidate two different but interrelated processes whereby class makes difference in young people’s everyday relationship to digital media: class conditioning and class positioning.

In order to illustrate the process of class conditioning, i.e. how certain material conditions of existence both condition and produce certain conditionings in relation to digital media practice, the paper draws mainly on in-depth interviews with parents and children conducted within a still ongoing project on digital media in economically deprived families with children. Class positioning is exemplified and discussed with reference to the findings of a completed qualitative study on the role of social class for young men’s digital media preferences and practices. The results of this study, based on interviews with 34 young men (16-19 years) of different social origin, clearly indicate how such preferences and practices are not only configured relationally in terms of class, but also potentially involved in the reproduction of the existing class structure.The ways in which the dual processes of class conditioning and class positioning are played out in the context of young people’s mediatized everyday life bear witness to the complexities involved in advancing a media policy geared towards general social welfare in the age of digital media. Universal internet penetration is a necessary but hardly sufficient condition for the abolishment of digital inequalities. The findings presented and discussed in this paper rather suggest that the ongoing proliferation of new media technologies and practices creates a rich soil for new forms of class-making.

National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-38258 (URN)
Conference
7th European Communication Conference - Centres and Peripheries: Communication, Research, Translation, Lugano, Switzerland, October 31-November 3, 2018
Available from: 2018-11-05 Created: 2018-11-05 Last updated: 2018-11-09Bibliographically approved
Andersson, L. & Danielsson, M. (2018). Intervention and participation: A study of children’s involvement in the design of media literacy interventions. In: : . Paper presented at 2nd International Media Literacy Research Symposium, Lisbon, Portugal, April 20, 2018 (pp. 15-15).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Intervention and participation: A study of children’s involvement in the design of media literacy interventions
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This paper presents findings from a review of articles about media literacy interventions, with the purpose to discuss the value of child participation in the design of such interventions. The findings indicate that while numerous studies present evaluations of media literacy interventions, it is rare that the design processes behind these interventions are described. The most popular form of media literacy intervention is a school curriculum aimed towards tweens and teens. We argue for a closer attention to the ways in which media literacy interventions are designed in order for us to better understand when child participation can be beneficial.

National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-36698 (URN)
Conference
2nd International Media Literacy Research Symposium, Lisbon, Portugal, April 20, 2018
Available from: 2018-04-27 Created: 2018-04-27 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Andersson, L. & Danielsson, M. (2018). Voice, Decision, Responsibility: Child Participation in the Design of Media Literacy Interventions. In: : . Paper presented at 68th Annual ICA Conference, Voices, Prague, Czech Republic, May 24-28, 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Voice, Decision, Responsibility: Child Participation in the Design of Media Literacy Interventions
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
National Category
Media Studies Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-36876 (URN)
Conference
68th Annual ICA Conference, Voices, Prague, Czech Republic, May 24-28, 2018
Available from: 2018-05-31 Created: 2018-05-31 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Lindell, J. & Danielsson, M. (2017). Moulding cultural capital into cosmopolitan capital: Media practices as reconversion work in a globalising world. Nordicom Review, 38(2), 51-64
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Moulding cultural capital into cosmopolitan capital: Media practices as reconversion work in a globalising world
2017 (English)In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 51-64Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Various media allow people to build transnational networks, learn about the world and meet people from other cultures. In other words, media may allow one to cultivate cosmopolitan capital, defined here as a distinct form of embodied cultural capital. However, far from everyone is identifying this potential. Analyses of a national survey and in-depth interviews, conducted in Sweden, disclose a tendency among those in possession of cultural capital to recognise and exploit cosmopolitan capital in their media practices. Those who are dispossessed of cultural capital are significantly less liable to approach media in this way. Relying on various media practices in order to reshape one’s cultural capital exemplifies what Bourdieu called a reconversion strategy. As social fields undergo globalisation, media offer opportunities for the privileged to remain privileged – to change in order to conserve.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Göteborg: Nordicom, 2017
Keywords
cultural capital, cosmopolitan capital, media practices, Bourdieu, media use
National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-34381 (URN)10.1515/nor-2017-0408 (DOI)
Available from: 2017-06-28 Created: 2017-06-28 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
Andersson, L. & Danielsson, M. (2017). The kids will have their say?: Child participation in media literacy interventions. In: NordMedia 2017 – Abstracts: Division 5, Media Literacy and Media Education. Paper presented at NordMedia 2017, 23rd Nordic Conference on Media and Communication Research, 17–19 August 2017, Tampere, Finland.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The kids will have their say?: Child participation in media literacy interventions
2017 (English)In: NordMedia 2017 – Abstracts: Division 5, Media Literacy and Media Education, 2017Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper presents the findings from a scoping review of articles about media literacy interventions, with the purpose to discuss the value of having children to participate in the design of media literacy interventions.

The findings indicate that while numerous studies present evaluations of media literacy interventions, it is rare that the design processes behind these interventions are thoroughly described. Furthermore, the review shows that even though child participation in the implementation of interventions is put forth as important by several studies, it is rare that participation in the design stage is discussed. Finally, the findings show that child participation in the design of media literacy interventions is not considered as a factor for successful media literacy interventions.

The paper ends with a discussion of the implications of these findings for further research on child participation in media literacy interventions. It is argued that we need to pay closer attention to the ways in which media literacy interventions are designed in order for us to better understand what makes them succeed or fail. More specifically, the role of child participation in this respect – not only in terms of listening to their various media-related questions and needs, but also in the sense of actual co-design – must be further examined.

Keywords
child participation, interventions, media and information literacy
National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-34923 (URN)
Conference
NordMedia 2017, 23rd Nordic Conference on Media and Communication Research, 17–19 August 2017, Tampere, Finland
Available from: 2017-09-12 Created: 2017-09-12 Last updated: 2017-09-13Bibliographically approved
Danielsson, M. (2017). The merits of Bourdieu in qualitative audience research: Uncovering class and continuity in the fragmented space of media practice. In: NordMedia 2017: 23rd Nordic Conference on Media and Communication Research: Tampere, 17–19 August 2017, Abstracts, TWG 8, Audience Studies. Paper presented at NordMedia 2017: Mediated Realities - Global Challenges, Tampere, Finland, August 17-19, 2017.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The merits of Bourdieu in qualitative audience research: Uncovering class and continuity in the fragmented space of media practice
2017 (English)In: NordMedia 2017: 23rd Nordic Conference on Media and Communication Research: Tampere, 17–19 August 2017, Abstracts, TWG 8, Audience Studies, 2017Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

For someone leaning towards statistical data analyses and showing little interest in the media as an integral part of people’s everyday life, French sociologist Pierre Bourdieu has surprisingly much to offer qualitative audience research in an increasingly complex everyday media environment. Drawing on the analytical experiences from a media ethnographic study on digital media practice in the everyday lives of young men (16-19 years) with different class backgrounds, this paper argues that Bourdieusian theory, despite certain limitations, might advance qualitative audience research in the “media manifold” (Couldry, 2012) in at least three important respects: (1) The first merit of Bourdieu’s theoretical framework is that it enables us to conceptualize and analyse the seemingly mundane media practices of everyday life as involved in macrostructural power relations and processes, e.g. social class and social reproduction. How people orientate and navigate themselves among the various possibilities embedded in their everyday media environment is clearly a matter of taste, and taste is neither innocent nor neutral in terms of class. Hence, Bourdieu might prevent us from getting stuck in what David Morley (2009) has called “an endless play of contextual specificity and infinite difference”. (2) The second merit of Bourdieusian theory in the context of qualitative audience research is that it allows us to grasp digital media practice not as an exceptional, almost elevated kind of practice, but as a variety of practices among other cultural practices. This accomplishes an important break with the still quite prevalent media-centrism and techno-romanticism of early new media studies, and thus makes it possible to pose new, perhaps more critical questions about the various roles of digital media in people’s everyday lives. (3) Because Bourdieusian theory allows us to theorize digital media practice as a variety of practices among other cultural practices, i.e. as an inseparable part of entire lifestyles in Bourdieu’s sense of the word – lifestyles through which social power relations (e.g. class) are expressed and reproduced – it also has the merit of supporting critical interrogations of the association commonly made between digital innovation, young people and social change. In other words, it makes it possible to uncover and make sense of the social and cultural continuities at play within recent technological changes, as well as the structural differences concealed by the widespread generational rhetoric of “digital natives” and “digital immigrants” (Prensky, 2001).

National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-34768 (URN)
Conference
NordMedia 2017: Mediated Realities - Global Challenges, Tampere, Finland, August 17-19, 2017
Available from: 2017-08-22 Created: 2017-08-22 Last updated: 2017-08-22Bibliographically approved
Danielsson, M. (2016). In the Peripheries of Network Society: Digital Media in Economically Deprived Families with Children in Sweden. In: ECREA 2016 Abstract Book: . Paper presented at 6th European Communication Conference (ECC) "Mediated (Dis)Continuities: Contesting Pasts, Presents and Futures", Prague, Czech Republic, November 9-12, 2016 (pp. 21-21). Prague: Czech-In
Open this publication in new window or tab >>In the Peripheries of Network Society: Digital Media in Economically Deprived Families with Children in Sweden
2016 (English)In: ECREA 2016 Abstract Book, Prague: Czech-In , 2016, p. 21-21Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

For most people in Sweden access to the internet can be taken for granted today, much in the same way as access to water and electricity. However, there are still parts of the population, not only among the elderly, for whom internet access might be a scarce resource and therefore also a source of struggle. This paper focuses on one such group, namely economically deprived families with children. More specifically, it presents the rationales and early results of an ongoing media ethnographic study on the various meanings attributed to digital media by the members of such households (both parents and children), focusing especially on the concerns, conflicts and strategies associated with the limitations surrounding their acquisition of digital media devices as well as their internet access and use, within an everyday context of economic deprivation.

Even though previous research on digital divides has convincingly shown them to be irreducible to a generational problem that will disappear by itself over time – for example, class-related variables such as educational level, occupation and income also matter – relatively little is known about their occurrences within the so-called “digital generation”, especially in Sweden. More generally, large-scale surveys have successfully evidenced and mapped the empirical patterns of digital divides among young people, but we still have limited knowledge about the contextually embedded generative mechanisms through which these patterns emerge. Even less attention has been paid to the ways in which young people at the margins of network society, along with their parents, actually experience and deal with their potentially limited internet access in everyday life.

Against this backdrop, this paper deals with the fundamental question of what it feels like raising children and growing up under conditions of scarce economic resources and potentially limited internet access in a highly wired society generally associated with social equality. What does it feel like not being able to give your children equal technological opportunities as their friends (or having to make huge sacrifices in order to secure such opportunities)? How do the potential experiences of feeling different and digitally excluded matter for the children’s well-being? And how are the potential conflicts stemming from the scarcity of (digital) resources affecting family life? Adopting a non-media-centric approach built around Bourdieusian social theory and insights from domestication research, the paper thus sets out to explore not only the meanings and uses of digital media in the particular context of economically deprived families with children in Sweden, but also the subjective and emotional dimensions of economic vulnerability and social class in today’s network society.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Prague: Czech-In, 2016
National Category
Media Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-32228 (URN)978-80-906655-0-7 (ISBN)
Conference
6th European Communication Conference (ECC) "Mediated (Dis)Continuities: Contesting Pasts, Presents and Futures", Prague, Czech Republic, November 9-12, 2016
Available from: 2016-10-20 Created: 2016-10-20 Last updated: 2016-11-15Bibliographically approved
Sundin, E., Andersson, L., Hallén, M. & Danielsson, M. (2016). Local Images of Health and Lifestyle: Free Newspapers, Community-construction and the “Healthy City”. In: : . Paper presented at ECREA Pre-Conference: Dealing with the Local: Proximity and Community, Prague, Czech Republic, November 8, 2016.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Local Images of Health and Lifestyle: Free Newspapers, Community-construction and the “Healthy City”
2016 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Local free newspapers and magazines have become an integrated part of urban life. They are no longer restricted to large cities and in an age of declining readership in traditional press, these publications are sometimes the only outlet that reaches the general population. This makes them interesting both in terms of media economy (the hyper-local as the only viable business model for print journalism), and in terms of the construction of community. Still, they are often an overlooked phenomenon in media and communication studies.

This paper takes its departure from the project “Healthy Cities”, a movement developed by WHO with the purpose to include health-related issues in the political, economic and social agenda. In this movement, WHO acknowledges media’s role for promoting health images from a local perspective. The paper will contribute to the research field of local media’s role for their audiences in terms of shaping ideas of being part of ”the good life”. From this perspective, media have an important function in individuals’ sense of belonging and well-being.

In recent years, the local media landscape in Sweden has changed. The mainstream journalism has been somewhat reduced, due to financial cutbacks. In the same time, there is a new pattern of free local newspapers and magazines, distributed within communities, and with clear ambitions to promote “the good life” within the geographical range of distribution. Since changes of mainstream media have weakened the traditional concept of media closeness, it is of importance to study the new and innovative media paths to connect individuals within communities (e.g. smaller towns) in order to understand how these work for individuals’ sense of belonging and especially related to issues of health, lifestyles and well-being.

In this paper we would like to take the opportunity to share the outlines for a research project on local free-of-charge media in the Swedish town Halmstad, that is one of the 1400 European town and city members in the “Healthy City” project.

 We present some preliminary findings from four newspapers and magazines that are giving much attention to promote the image of “the good life” through articles about health, lifestyles and well-being.

 The research project is part of an initiative to chart contemporary urban town living through an interdisciplinary research program that uses a community studies approach, where the aim of the present study is to understand the role that the free newspapers (and similar media outlets) play in representing and making sense of notions such as “health”, “lifestyle” and ”well-being” in Halmstad.

National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-32007 (URN)
Conference
ECREA Pre-Conference: Dealing with the Local: Proximity and Community, Prague, Czech Republic, November 8, 2016
Available from: 2016-09-14 Created: 2016-09-14 Last updated: 2017-03-06Bibliographically approved
Lindell, J. & Danielsson, M. (2016). Trading cultural capital for cosmopolitan capital: media practice as reconversion work in a globalizing world. In: : . Paper presented at 66th Annual Conference of the International Communication Association: Communicating With Power (ICA), Fukuoka, Japan, June 9-13, 2016.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Trading cultural capital for cosmopolitan capital: media practice as reconversion work in a globalizing world
2016 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Various media allow people to build transnational networks, learn about the world and meet people from other cultures. In other words, media may allow one to cultivate a cosmopolitan capital. However, far from everyone is recognizing this potential. This study argues that cosmopolitan ‘readings’ of the contemporary media landscape should be understood in relation to cultural capital. Analyses from a national survey and in-depth interviews, conducted in Sweden, disclose a tendency among those in possession of cultural capital to recognize and exploit cosmopolitan capital in their media practices. Those in dispossession of cultural capital are significantly less prone to approach the media in this way. Relying on various media practices in order to exchange one capital for another exemplifies what Bourdieu called reconversion strategies. As social fields become more global, media offer opportunities for those occupying positions of relative (cultural) privilege to remain privileged – to change in order to conserve.

National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-31435 (URN)
External cooperation:
Conference
66th Annual Conference of the International Communication Association: Communicating With Power (ICA), Fukuoka, Japan, June 9-13, 2016
Available from: 2016-06-28 Created: 2016-06-28 Last updated: 2016-09-13Bibliographically approved
Lindell, J. & Danielsson, M. (2015). "And like that I'm talking to a girl from China, you know": Cultural capital and the classification of media as avenues of cosmopolitan cultivation. In: Book of Abstracts: geomedia 2015: Spaces and Mobilities in Mediatized Worlds, May 5-8 2015, Karlstad Sweden. Paper presented at GeoMedia 2015: Spaces and Mobilities in Mediatized Worlds, Karlstad, Sweden, May 5-8, 2015 (pp. 60-60).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>"And like that I'm talking to a girl from China, you know": Cultural capital and the classification of media as avenues of cosmopolitan cultivation
2015 (English)In: Book of Abstracts: geomedia 2015: Spaces and Mobilities in Mediatized Worlds, May 5-8 2015, Karlstad Sweden, 2015, p. 60-60Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The phenomenon of a “mediated cosmopolitanism” has mainly been studied from a perspective that attempts to discern the extent to which various messages of the media succeed or fail in establishing moral solidarity with “the distant other”. This perspective misses two crucial points worthy of pursuing when attempting to understand the relationship between media and cosmopolitanism. Firstly, it still remains rather unclear what sense audiences and users make of the potential globalizing potential of the contemporary media landscape. Secondly, cosmopolitanism cannot solely be conceptualized as a moral obligation across vast distances, but needs also to be understood as a form of capital, as social fields become increasingly transnational. By understanding users and audiences of potentially global media as contextualized social agents we engage with the relationship between cosmopolitanism and the media from a new vantage point. In departing from the media-centric tendencies in the research area, we turn to the question of how classified social agents classify the contemporary media landscape as gateways to the wider world. What emerges in our qualitative and quantitative data is a pattern of social reproduction – agents strong on cultural capital are particularly prone to approach the media landscape as an avenue for the generation of cosmopolitan capital. There is thus reason to question the universalizing rhetoric pertaining to notions of a “mediated cosmopolitanism” and study the ways in which agents’ orientations in the media landscape are part of strategies of social reproduction.

National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-28261 (URN)
Conference
GeoMedia 2015: Spaces and Mobilities in Mediatized Worlds, Karlstad, Sweden, May 5-8, 2015
Available from: 2015-05-14 Created: 2015-05-14 Last updated: 2016-12-02Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-3070-4717

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