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Lindholm, A., Roswall, J., Alm, B., Almquist-Tangen, G., Bremander, A., Dahlgren, J., . . . Bergman, S. (2019). Body mass index classification misses to identify children with an elevated waist-to-height ratio at 5 years of age. Pediatric Research, 85(1), 30-32
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Body mass index classification misses to identify children with an elevated waist-to-height ratio at 5 years of age
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2019 (English)In: Pediatric Research, ISSN 0031-3998, E-ISSN 1530-0447, Vol. 85, no 1, p. 30-32Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background:  Abdominal adiposity is an important risk factor in the metabolic syndrome. Since BMI does not reveal fat distribution, waist-to-height ratio (WHtR) has been suggested as a better measure of abdominal adiposity in children, but only a few studies cover the preschool population. The aim of the present study was to examine BMI and WHtR growth patterns and their association regarding their ability to identify children with an elevated WHtR at 5 years of age.

Methods: A population-based longitudinal birth cohort study of 1540 children, followed from 0 to 5 years with nine measurement points. The children were classified as having WHtR standard deviation scores (WHtRSDS) <1 or ≥1 at 5 years. Student’s t-tests and Chi-squared tests were used in the analyses.

Results: Association between BMISDS and WHtRSDS at 5 years showed that 55% of children with WHtRSDS ≥1 at 5 years had normal BMISDS (p < 0.001). Children with WHtRSDS ≥1 at 5 years had from an early age significantly higher mean BMISDS and WHtRSDS than children with values <1.

Conclusions: BMI classification misses every second child with WHtRSDS ≥1 at 5 years, suggesting that WHtR adds value in identifying children with abdominal adiposity who may need further investigation regarding cardiometabolic risk factors.

© 2018, International Pediatric Research Foundation, Inc.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York, NY: Nature Publishing Group, 2019
National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-38474 (URN)10.1038/s41390-018-0188-4 (DOI)30287892 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85054473136 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Halland Health and Growth Study
Available from: 2018-12-03 Created: 2018-12-03 Last updated: 2019-04-24Bibliographically approved
Arvidsson, S., Nylander, M. & Bergman, S. (2019). Callers´perceptions of their contact with a rheumatology telephone helpline. Musculoskeletal Care, 17(1), 105-112
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Callers´perceptions of their contact with a rheumatology telephone helpline
2019 (English)In: Musculoskeletal Care, ISSN 1478-2189, E-ISSN 1557-0681, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 105-112Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Telephone helplines are useful for improving patients' access to healthcare services and reducing the need for frequent face‐to‐face contact with healthcare professionals. Little is known about how people who phone a helpline perceive the encounter.

Objectives: The aims of the present study were to describe the variation in how callers perceive their encounter with a rheumatology telephone helpline.

Methods: The  study  had  a  descriptive,  qualitative  design  and  used  a phenomenographic approach, comprising 27 semi‐structured telephone interviews with callers to Rheuma Direct, a rheumatology telephone helpline with specially trained nurses. The callers comprised 22 women and five men, aged 22–89 years (mean 54 years).

Results: The callers phoned Rheuma Direct when they had problems obtaining answers to questions on the internet or from healthcare professionals. Three descriptive categories emerged: constructive dialogue, specialized competence and applicability. The callers perceived that it was a constructive dialogue when they were able to discuss their concerns with someone, received emotional support, felt reassured and were satisfied with the information provided. They perceived specialized competence when the nurses were experienced and skilful, the advice provided complemented previously received information and when they had more knowledge after the call. The callers perceived that Rheuma Direct had applicability because it was easy to access and they could make different choices before, during and after the telephone call. 

Conclusions: Callers to a rheumatology telephone helpline perceived it as a valuable complement to other sources of information, and felt that it could provide them with the tools to manage their disease better, as well as future contacts with healthcare professionals. © 2018 The Authors Musculoskeletal Care published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford: John Wiley & Sons, 2019
Keywords
nurse, qualitative research, rheumatology
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-38460 (URN)10.1002/msc.1374 (DOI)30468564 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85057111450 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding: Swedish Rheumatism Association (grant number: R‐558491) & Spenshult Research and Development Centre

Available from: 2018-11-30 Created: 2018-11-30 Last updated: 2019-03-29Bibliographically approved
Drab, B., Aili, K., Haglund, E. & Bergman, S. (2019). Chronic pain and sick leave in a 21-year follow up. Paper presented at Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2019), Madrid, Spain, June 12-15, 2019. Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, 78(Suppl 2), 122-122
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Chronic pain and sick leave in a 21-year follow up
2019 (English)In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 78, no Suppl 2, p. 122-122Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Chronic musculoskeletal pain (CMP) is a common cause of disability and impaired quality of life. In Sweden, chronic pain and mental illness are major causes of sick leave. But sick leave itself is also proposed as a risk factor for prolonged sick leave and disability pension.

Objectives: To study CMP and sick leave as potential risk factors for long term sick leave or disability pension in a 21 year follow up of a general population cohort.

Methods: In a cohort study, with a baseline survey in 1995, 1466 individuals aged 20-67 years were followed for 3 years and 691 for 21 years, or up to the age of 67. CMP (>3 months duration) was reported on a pain mannequin. Sick leave and disability pension were self-reported. Mental health was measured by the mental health (MH) score of the SF-36 health status, and categorized into tertiaries (best, medium and worst). CMP, sick leave, and mental health at baseline, were studied as potential predictors for long term sick leave (disability pension or sick leave >3 months) at a 3 and 21 year follow up. Other potential predictors (socioeconomic group, education, and immigrant status) were introduced in multiple regression analyzes but did not add to the results and were removed from the final models, which were controlled for age and sex.

Results: CMP and mental health predicted long term sick leave at the 3 year follow up (OR 2.11, p=0.010 and OR 3.52, p<0.001). Mental health (OR 1.92, p=0.046), but not CMP (OR 0.77, p=0.409), was also a predictor at the 21 year follow up. Sick leave >3 months, irrespectively if due to pain or not, predicted long term sick leave both at the 3 and the 21 year follow up (Table). Sick leave for ≤3 months also predicted long term sick leave at both follow ups when due to pain (OR 2.70, p=0.008 and OR 2.78, p=0.012), but not when due to other causes (OR 1.52, p=0.212 and OR 1.17, p=0.606).

Conclusion: Sick leave and especially sick leave due to pain predicted long term sick leave up to 21 years later, independently of pain status or mental health at baseline. It is thus important to early identify individuals at risk and minimize sick leave by providing proper rehabilitation.

© Drab, Aili, Haglund & Bergman 2019. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London, UK: BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2019
Keywords
Chronic pain, Sickness absence
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-40944 (URN)10.1136/annrheumdis-2019-eular.2021 (DOI)000472207100311 ()
Conference
Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2019), Madrid, Spain, June 12-15, 2019
Available from: 2019-11-14 Created: 2019-11-14 Last updated: 2019-11-27Bibliographically approved
Almquist-Tangen, G., Bergman, S., Dahlgren, J., Lindholm, A., Roswall, J. & Alm, B. (2019). Consuming milk cereal drinks at one year of age was associated with a twofold risk of being overweight at the age of five. Acta Paediatrica, 108(6), 1115-1121
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Consuming milk cereal drinks at one year of age was associated with a twofold risk of being overweight at the age of five
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2019 (English)In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 108, no 6, p. 1115-1121Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: We previously reported that consuming milk cereal drinks at six months of age was associated with a high body mass index (BMI) at 12 and 18 months. This study examined the association between daily consumption at 12 months of age and BMI at the age of five.

Methods: We followed up 1870/2666 (70%) children recruited at birth in 2007–2008 for the Swedish longitudinal population‐based Halland Health and Growth Study a mean of 5.09 ± 0.28 years. Feeding practices were obtained from parental questionnaires, and anthropometric data were collected by child health nurses.

Results: At five years, 11.6% were overweight and 2.3% were obese. Milk cereal drinks were consumed by about 85% and 10% at one and five years of age, respectively. Consumption at 12 months was associated with almost double the risk of being overweight at five years of age (adjusted odds ratio 1.94, 95% confidence interval 1.08–3.50). Other risk factors were a family history of obesity, low paternal educational level and paternal smoking.

Conclusion: Consuming milk cereal drinks daily at 12 months was associated with a twofold risk of being overweight at five years. These findings may affect the counselling guidelines used at child healthcare centres. Copyright © 2019 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Inc., 2019
Keywords
Epidemiology, Infant, Milk cereal drinks, Obesity, Overweight
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-40802 (URN)10.1111/apa.14666 (DOI)000488458001098 ()30511422 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85058864923 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Region Skåne
Note

Other funder: Research and Development Department at the Region of Halland

Available from: 2019-10-30 Created: 2019-10-30 Last updated: 2019-11-27Bibliographically approved
Malm, K., Bergman, S., Bremander, A., Larsson, I. & Andersson, M. L. E. (2019). Discussions of lifestyle habits as an integral part of care management: a cross-sectional cohort study in patients with established rheumatoid arthritis in Sweden. Rheumatology Advances in Practice, 3(2), Article ID rkz039.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Discussions of lifestyle habits as an integral part of care management: a cross-sectional cohort study in patients with established rheumatoid arthritis in Sweden
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2019 (English)In: Rheumatology Advances in Practice, E-ISSN 2514-1775, Vol. 3, no 2, article id rkz039Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: The primary aim was to determine whether patients with RA recalled having discussions concerning lifestyle habits during their health-care visits. The secondary aim was to study the association between patients' reported lifestyle and their wish to discuss it.

Methods: A postal questionnaire sent to 1542 eligible patients from the Better Anti-Rheumatic Pharmacotherapy (BARFOT) study included questions on lifestyle habits (physical activity, diet, smoking and alcohol), on whether these were discussed during health-care visits and on whether there was an interest in such discussions.

Results: A total of 1061 patients (68%) responded [mean age 67 (s.d. 13) years, 73% women]. Half of the patients (49%) recalled discussions on physical activity, and 23% recalled discussions about diet. Those who reported health-enhancing levels of physical activity were more likely to discuss physical activity with their health professionals. Likewise, patients who reported having a non-traditional mixed diet were more likely to discuss diet. Smoking was discussed with 25% of the patients, more often with current smokers than with non-smokers (32 vs 17%; P < 0.001). Alcohol was discussed with 17% of the patients. Of those patients who reported having hazardous drinking habits, 77% had not discussed alcohol use with any health professional.

Conclusion: Discussions about lifestyle were recalled by half of the patients with established RA. There is a need for improvement, because lifestyle habits may affect the long-term outcome in a chronic disease, such as RA. Patient education concerning lifestyle habits should be an integral part of care management and an interactive process. © Malm et al. 2019. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2019
Keywords
rheumatoid arthritis, lifestyle, habits, physical activity, diet, smoking, alcohol, discussion
National Category
Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-40912 (URN)10.1093/rap/rkz039 (DOI)31701084 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Rheumatism Association
Note

Other funders: County Council of Halland Research Fund & Norrbacka-Eugenia Foundation

Available from: 2019-11-12 Created: 2019-11-12 Last updated: 2019-11-27Bibliographically approved
Lindholm, A., Bergman, S., Alm, B., Almquist-Tangen, G., Dahlgren, J. & Roswall, J. (2019). Infant body mass index growth patterns predicted overweight at five years, waist-to-height ratio did not add to this predictivity. Acta Paediatrica, 108(5), 945-953
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Infant body mass index growth patterns predicted overweight at five years, waist-to-height ratio did not add to this predictivity
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2019 (English)In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 108, no 5, p. 945-953Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: The aim of the present study was to examine body mass index (BMI) and waist‐to‐height ratio (WHtR) growth patterns from birth until five years regarding their ability to predict overweight or obesity in children at five years of age.

Methods: Population‐based longitudinal birth cohort study of 1540 children from the south‐west region of Sweden, recruited at the first visit to the child health care centres in 2007–2008. The children were followed for five years and classified into two weight groups according to the 2012 International Obesity Task Force criteria. BMI and WHtR standard deviation scores (SDS) were analysed with Student's t‐tests and multiple logistic regression models. ©2018 Foundation Acta Pædiatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd

Results: BMI‐SDS and WHtR‐SDS growth patterns were from an early age different in children with overweight or obesity, compared to in children with normal weight or underweight. Overweight or obesity was significantly predicted by BMI‐SDS at 0–1 month (p < 0.001), ΔBMI‐SDS between 0–1 and 12 months (p < 0.001) and between 18 and 48 months (p < 0.001), but not by WHtR‐SDS, except for a negative association between 18 and 48 months in the boys (p = 0.040).

Conclusion: Overweight or obesity at five years could be predicted by early BMI‐SDS growth patterns, and WHtR‐SDS did not add to the predictivity with regard to BMI‐SDS. ©2018 Foundation Acta Pædiatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Inc., 2019
Keywords
Body mass index, Childhood obesity, Childhood overweight, Growth patterns, Waist-to-height ratio
National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-38475 (URN)10.1111/apa.14572 (DOI)30192410 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85055058956 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding: Region Halland, Research and Development Center Spenshult, Her Royal Highness Crown Princess Lovisa's Association for Child Care/Axel Tielmans Memorial Fund and Halmstad University.

Available from: 2018-12-03 Created: 2018-12-03 Last updated: 2019-04-24Bibliographically approved
Aili, K., Campbell, P., Michaleff, Z., Strauss, V., Jordan, K., Bremander, A., . . . Bergman, S. (2019). Long term trajectories of chronic widespread pain: a 21-year prospective cohort latent class analysis. Paper presented at Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2019), Madrid, Spain, June 12-15, 2019. Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, 78(Suppl 2), 239-239
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Long term trajectories of chronic widespread pain: a 21-year prospective cohort latent class analysis
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2019 (English)In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 78, no Suppl 2, p. 239-239Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Chronic widespread pain (CWP) is common (population prevalence of approximately 10%) and has a significant impact on the individual, healthcare, and society. Currently little is known about the actual course of CWP over time, in particular the pathways to the development and maintenance of CWP. One useful way to understand these pathways is to identify common clusters of people who share pain trajectories. Such information is clinically useful to identify factors that predict development, persistence, and resolution of CWP.

Objectives: To identify different longitudinal pain trajectories over a period of 21 years.

Methods: A 21-year longitudinal open-population cohort of n=1858 adults (aged 20-74) who completed surveys relating to their pain status in at least three of the five time points 1995, 1998, 2003, 2007, and 2016. Pain status (presence of persistent pain) was ascertained from a report of painful regions (0-18) on a pain mannequin and categorised into: NCP (No chronic pain), CRP (Chronic regional pain) and CWP (chronic widespread pain). Latent Class Growth Analysis (LCGA) was carried out based on these categories. Participants were assigned to a trajectory cluster where the posterior probability was the highest. Model fit was assessed by statistical indices and clinical interpretations of clusters.

Results: LCGA identified five clusters describing different pathways of NCP, CRP and CWP over the 21 years. The cluster “Persistent NCP” was the most common pathway (n = 1052, 57%) representing those with no chronic pain over the whole time period. The “Persistent CRP or Migration from CRP to NCP” cluster included 411 individuals (22%) representing a group with stable or improving regional pain. In the groups who were shown to increase pain status, the “Migration from NCP to CRP or CWP” cluster included 92 individuals (5%), and there were 184 individuals (10%) in the cluster “Migration from CRP to CWP” representing a group with regional pain who developed CWP. The final cluster “Persistent CWP” included 119 individuals (6%) representing those with stable CWP throughout the time period. Figure 1 presents the mean number of pain sites over time by cluster.

Conclusion: This study showed that whilst half of adults report no chronic pain over 21 years, a substantial proportion develop CWP or have persistent CWP over this time period. Whilst a common trajectory was movement from chronic regional pain to no chronic pain, a pattern of improving CWP was not seen suggesting this is an uncommon trajectory. This is the first study to show long-term trajectories for CWP, and further work is now required to understand factors that may identify individuals at risk of worsening pain status and factors that might promote improvement. These identified pathways of chronic pain over a lifespan improve the understanding of long-term development of chronic pain and chronic widespread pain. © Aili et al. 2019. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London, UK: BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2019
Keywords
Chronic pain, public health
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-40943 (URN)10.1136/annrheumdis-2019-eular.2993 (DOI)000472207100527 ()
Conference
Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2019), Madrid, Spain, June 12-15, 2019
Available from: 2019-11-14 Created: 2019-11-14 Last updated: 2019-11-27Bibliographically approved
Aili, K., Bergman, S., Bremander, A., Haglund, E. & Larsson, I. (2019). Passive coping strategies but not physical function are associated with worse mental health, in women with chronic widespread pain – a mixed method study. Paper presented at Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2019), Madrid, Spain, June 12-15, 2019. Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, 78(Suppl 2), 2159-2159
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Passive coping strategies but not physical function are associated with worse mental health, in women with chronic widespread pain – a mixed method study
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2019 (English)In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 78, no Suppl 2, p. 2159-2159Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Chronic widespread pain (CWP) is a common condition (approximately 10% prevalence), that affects women twice as often as men. There is a lack of knowledge in how different coping strategies relates to health status during CWP development in a general population.

Objectives: To explore different ways of coping with CWP and to relate the different coping strategies to health-related factors, before and after developing CWP.

Methods: A sequential explorative mixed methods study including 19 women 45-67 of age, who had reported CWP in a survey 2016, but not in 1995. Individual interviews were analysed with a phenomenographic approach, and resulted in four categories of coping strategies. These categories were further explored with regard to four dimensions of health status (physical function, bodily pain, vitality and mental health) as measured by SF-36 (0-100, a lower score indicates more disability) and sleep problems measured both in 1995, and 2016.

Results: The qualitative analysis revealed four categories representing different coping strategies, where each woman was labelled by the most dominant category; the mastering woman, the persistent woman, the compliant woman and the conquered woman. The first two categories emerged as being active coping strategies, and the latter two as passive. Women with passive strategies reported significantly lower vitality (median 57.5 vs 75, p=0.007) and worse mental health (median 54 vs 93, p=0.021) in 1995, before they had developed CWP compared with those with active coping strategies. No differences were seen between the groups on physical function, bodily pain or sleep.

In 2016, there were still a difference between the passive and active group regarding mental health (median 56 vs 80, p=0.022), but not for vitality (median 35 vs 40, p=0.707). No differences were seen between the groups on physical function or bodily pain. All eight women with passive strategies reported problems with sleep in 2016, as compared to 6 of the 11 women with active strategies (p=0.045).

Conclusion: Women that reported CWP in 2016, but not in 1995, described both active and passive coping strategies. The qualitative findings were associated with differences in vitality and mental health already in 1995, before they had developed CWP. Further, those with passive coping strategies reported worse health with regard to mental health and sleep problems in 2016. Interestingly, the groups did not differ in bodily pain or physical function neither in 1995 nor in 2016, which implicates the importance for the clinician to take the typical coping strategy into consideration, when meeting these patients in clinical settings. © Aili, Bergman, Bremander, Haglund & Larsson 2019. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London, UK: BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2019
Keywords
Chronic widespread pain, health, mental health, coping
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-40949 (URN)10.1136/annrheumdis-2019-eular.5393 (DOI)
Conference
Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2019), Madrid, Spain, June 12-15, 2019
Available from: 2019-11-14 Created: 2019-11-14 Last updated: 2019-11-27Bibliographically approved
Malmborg, J. S., Bremander, A., Olsson, M. C., Bergman, A.-C., Brorsson, A. S. & Bergman, S. (2019). Worse health status, sleeping problems, and anxiety in 16-year-old students are associated with chronic musculoskeletal pain at three-year follow-up. BMC Public Health, 19(1), Article ID 1565.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Worse health status, sleeping problems, and anxiety in 16-year-old students are associated with chronic musculoskeletal pain at three-year follow-up
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2019 (English)In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 19, no 1, article id 1565Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Chronic musculoskeletal pain is common in adolescents, and it has been shown that adolescents with pain may become young adults with pain. Pain often coincides with psychosomatic symptoms in adults, but little is known about longitudinal associations and predictors of pain in adolescents. The aim was to investigate chronic musculoskeletal pain and its associations with health status, sleeping problems, stress, anxiety, depression, and physical activity in 16-year-old students at baseline, and to identify risk factors using a three-year follow-up.

METHODS: This was a longitudinal study of 256 students attending a Swedish upper secondary school. Questionnaires regarding chronic musculoskeletal pain and distribution of pain (mannequin), health status (EQ-5D-3 L), sleeping problems (Uppsala Sleep Inventory), stress symptoms (single-item question), anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), and physical activity (International Physical Activity Questionnaire) were issued at baseline and follow-up. Student's t-test and chi2 test were used for descriptive statistics and logistic regression analyses were used to study associations between chronic pain and independent variables.

RESULTS: Fifty-two out of 221 students at baseline (23.5%) and 39 out of 154 students at follow-up (25.3%) were categorized as having chronic musculoskeletal pain. Chronic musculoskeletal pain at follow-up was separately associated with reporting of an EQ-5D value below median (OR 4.06, 95% CI 1.83-9.01), severe sleeping problems (OR 3.63, 95% CI 1.69-7.82), and possible anxiety (OR 4.19, 95% CI 1.74-10.11) or probable anxiety (OR 3.82, 95% CI 1.17-12.48) at baseline. Similar results were found for associations between chronic musculoskeletal pain and independent variables at baseline. In multiple logistic regression analysis, chronic musculoskeletal pain at baseline was a predictor of chronic musculoskeletal pain at follow-up (OR 2.99, 95% CI 1.09-8.24, R2 = 0.240).

CONCLUSION: Chronic musculoskeletal pain at baseline was the most important predictor for reporting chronic musculoskeletal pain at the three-year follow-up, but a worse health status, severe sleeping problems, and anxiety also predicted persistence or development of chronic musculoskeletal pain over time. Interventions should be introduced early on by the school health services to promote student health.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: BioMed Central, 2019
Keywords
Adolescent, Anxiety, Chronic musculoskeletal pain, Epidemiology, Health status, Sleep, Student
National Category
Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-41079 (URN)10.1186/s12889-019-7955-y (DOI)31771551 (PubMedID)
Note

The study was supported financially by Halmstad University; The Swedish Rheumatism Association; and Region Halland (grant number HALLAND-469111), Sweden.

Available from: 2019-12-03 Created: 2019-12-03 Last updated: 2019-12-03Bibliographically approved
Bergman, S., Haglund, E., Aili, K., Olsson, C. & Bremander, A. (2018). Chronic widespread pain, sleep problems and pressure pain thresholds in a population sample. Paper presented at EULAR, Annual European Congress of Rheumatology, 13-16 June, 2018 Amsterdam, Netherlands. Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, 7(2), 1645-1646
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Chronic widespread pain, sleep problems and pressure pain thresholds in a population sample
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2018 (English)In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 1645-1646Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2018
National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-38548 (URN)10.1136/annrheumdis-2018-eular.6827 (DOI)000444351005059 ()
Conference
EULAR, Annual European Congress of Rheumatology, 13-16 June, 2018 Amsterdam, Netherlands
Available from: 2018-12-13 Created: 2018-12-13 Last updated: 2018-12-13Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-6294-538X

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