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Aili, K., Bergman, S. & Haglund, E. (2019). Adding information on widespread pain to the start back screening tool when identifying low back pain patients at increased risk for poor prognosis. Paper presented at Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2019), Madrid, Spain, June 12-15, 2019. Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, 78(Suppl 2), 1457-1457
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adding information on widespread pain to the start back screening tool when identifying low back pain patients at increased risk for poor prognosis
2019 (English)In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 78, no Suppl 2, p. 1457-1457Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London, UK: BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2019
Keywords
low back pain, screening, primary care
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-40947 (URN)
Conference
Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2019), Madrid, Spain, June 12-15, 2019
Available from: 2019-11-14 Created: 2019-11-14 Last updated: 2019-12-11
Olsson, M. C., Fälth, J., Ahlebrand, A., Andersson, Å. & Haglund, E. (2019). Bench press muscle activation with triceps brachii pre-exhaustion in females and males. Paper presented at BASES Conference 2019, Leicester, United Kingdom, November 19-20, 2019. Journal of Sports Sciences, 37(Supp1), 71-72, Article ID D2.P6..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bench press muscle activation with triceps brachii pre-exhaustion in females and males
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Sports Sciences, ISSN 0264-0414, E-ISSN 1466-447X, Vol. 37, no Supp1, p. 71-72, article id D2.P6.Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Abingdon: Routledge, 2019
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-41063 (URN)10.1080/02640414.2019.1671688 (DOI)
Conference
BASES Conference 2019, Leicester, United Kingdom, November 19-20, 2019
Available from: 2019-12-02 Created: 2019-12-02 Last updated: 2019-12-10Bibliographically approved
Drab, B., Aili, K., Haglund, E. & Bergman, S. (2019). Chronic pain and sick leave in a 21-year follow up. Paper presented at Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2019), Madrid, Spain, June 12-15, 2019. Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, 78(Suppl 2), 122-122
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Chronic pain and sick leave in a 21-year follow up
2019 (English)In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 78, no Suppl 2, p. 122-122Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Chronic musculoskeletal pain (CMP) is a common cause of disability and impaired quality of life. In Sweden, chronic pain and mental illness are major causes of sick leave. But sick leave itself is also proposed as a risk factor for prolonged sick leave and disability pension.

Objectives: To study CMP and sick leave as potential risk factors for long term sick leave or disability pension in a 21 year follow up of a general population cohort.

Methods: In a cohort study, with a baseline survey in 1995, 1466 individuals aged 20-67 years were followed for 3 years and 691 for 21 years, or up to the age of 67. CMP (>3 months duration) was reported on a pain mannequin. Sick leave and disability pension were self-reported. Mental health was measured by the mental health (MH) score of the SF-36 health status, and categorized into tertiaries (best, medium and worst). CMP, sick leave, and mental health at baseline, were studied as potential predictors for long term sick leave (disability pension or sick leave >3 months) at a 3 and 21 year follow up. Other potential predictors (socioeconomic group, education, and immigrant status) were introduced in multiple regression analyzes but did not add to the results and were removed from the final models, which were controlled for age and sex.

Results: CMP and mental health predicted long term sick leave at the 3 year follow up (OR 2.11, p=0.010 and OR 3.52, p<0.001). Mental health (OR 1.92, p=0.046), but not CMP (OR 0.77, p=0.409), was also a predictor at the 21 year follow up. Sick leave >3 months, irrespectively if due to pain or not, predicted long term sick leave both at the 3 and the 21 year follow up (Table). Sick leave for ≤3 months also predicted long term sick leave at both follow ups when due to pain (OR 2.70, p=0.008 and OR 2.78, p=0.012), but not when due to other causes (OR 1.52, p=0.212 and OR 1.17, p=0.606).

Conclusion: Sick leave and especially sick leave due to pain predicted long term sick leave up to 21 years later, independently of pain status or mental health at baseline. It is thus important to early identify individuals at risk and minimize sick leave by providing proper rehabilitation.

© Drab, Aili, Haglund & Bergman 2019. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London, UK: BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2019
Keywords
Chronic pain, Sickness absence
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-40944 (URN)10.1136/annrheumdis-2019-eular.2021 (DOI)000472207100311 ()
Conference
Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2019), Madrid, Spain, June 12-15, 2019
Available from: 2019-11-14 Created: 2019-11-14 Last updated: 2019-11-27Bibliographically approved
Haglund, E., Pinheiro Sant'Anna, A., Andersson, M., Bremander, A. & Aili, K. (2019). Dynamic joint stability measured as gait symmetry in people with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis. Paper presented at Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2019), Madrid, Spain, June 12-15, 2019. Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, 78(Suppl. 2)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dynamic joint stability measured as gait symmetry in people with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis
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2019 (English)In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 78, no Suppl. 2, p. -1458Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Modern strategies for knee osteoarthritis (OA) treatment and prevention includes early detection and analyses about pain, gait and lower extremity muscle function including both strength and stability. The very first sign of knee OA is pain or perceived knee instability, often experienced during weight bearing activities e.g. walking. Increased muscle strength will provide dynamic joint stability, reduce pain, and disability. Specific measures of gait symmetry (GS) can be assessed objectively by using accelerometers, which potentially is a feasible method when evaluating early symptoms of symptomatic knee OA.

Objectives: The aim was to study if symptoms of early knee pain affected gait symmetry, and the association between lower extremity muscles function and gait symmetry in patients with symptomatic knee OA.

Methods: Thirty-five participants (mean age 52 SD 9 years, 66% women) with uni- or bilateral symptomatic knee OA, and without signs of an inflammatory rheumatic disease or knee trauma were included. Pain was assessed by a numeric rating scale (NRS, range 0-10 best to worse), tests of lower extremity muscle function with the maximum number of one leg rises. Dynamic stability was measured as GS by using wearable inertial sensors (PXNordic senseneering platform), during the 6 min walking test to obtain spatio-temporal gait parameters. GS was computed based on stride time (temporal symmetry, TS) and stride length (spatial symmetry, SS). Stride length was normalized by height. Kruskal-Wallis and Spearman’s correlation coefficient were used for analyses.

Results: Reports of knee pain did not differ between gender (women 4.7, SD 2.4 vs. men 3.9, SD 2.4, p= 0.362), neither did one leg rises or gait symmetry. Participants who reported unilateral knee pain (left/right side n=9/13), had a shorter stride length on the painful side. The mean difference in stride length was 0.7% of the subject’s height (SD 1.3). Participants with unilateral pain also presented less SS gait than those who reported bilateral pain (p=0.005). The higher number of one-leg rises performed, the better TS was observed. We found a significant relationship between TS and one-leg rise for the right r s =-0.39, p=0.006, and left r s =-0.40, p=0.004 left side). No significant relationship was observed between SS and one-leg rises.

Conclusion: Our results is in line with earlier findings stating that knee pain affects GS negatively and that lower extremity muscle function is an important feature for symmetry and dynamic joint stability in patients with symptomatic knee OA. We also found that pain in one leg was related to impaired GS. Bilateral knee pain was however more symmetrical and will need healthy controls for comparison to better understand the negative impact of symptomatic knee OA.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London, UK: BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2019
Keywords
Knee osteoarthritis, joint stability, objective measure
National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-40948 (URN)000472207104307 ()
Conference
Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2019), Madrid, Spain, June 12-15, 2019
Available from: 2019-11-14 Created: 2019-11-14 Last updated: 2019-12-09Bibliographically approved
Ryman Augustsson, S., Arvidsson, J. & Haglund, E. (2019). Jump height as performance indicator for the selection of youth football players to national teams. Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness, 59(10), 1669-1675
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Jump height as performance indicator for the selection of youth football players to national teams
2019 (English)In: Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness, ISSN 0022-4707, E-ISSN 1827-1928, Vol. 59, no 10, p. 1669-1675Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Different jump tests such as the Countermovement Jump (CMJ), Abalakov Jump (AJ) and Standing Long Jump (SLJ) are often used in practice to evaluate muscular power and functional performance in football. These tests are also used in different selection processes and talent identification, but the significance of the tests for the selection of youth players to national teams are relatively unknown. The aim of this study was to compare jump ability between youth football players selected or not selected for the national team.

Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 22 players (aged 17±2 years), 11 national players (NP) and 11 non-national players (NNP) were evaluated in three different jump tests; CMJ, AJ and SLJ. Mean scores for the tests were analyzed and compared.

Results: Significant differences were found between the groups regarding jump height in favor of the NP group in both the CMJ (NP 39.9±5.0 cm vs. NNP 34.2±4.9 cm, P=0.013) and the AJ (NP 47.1±5.4 vs. NNP 40.9±4.7, P=0.010). No group difference was found regarding jump length in SLJ (NP 246.2±17.9 vs. NNP 232.9±16.5, P=0.084).

Conclusions: The results suggest that tests, measuring jump height, could be used as a performance indicator and part of the selection process of youth football players to national teams, whereas the use of jump length could be questioned. Copyright © 2019 Edizioni Minerva Medica

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Turin: Edizioni Minerva Medica, 2019
Keywords
Jump, muscular power, performance, football
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-41223 (URN)10.23736/S0022-4707.19.09739-1 (DOI)000495896400009 ()31062951 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85074674961 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-12-10 Created: 2019-12-10 Last updated: 2019-12-11Bibliographically approved
Aili, K., Bergman, S., Bremander, A., Haglund, E. & Larsson, I. (2019). Passive coping strategies but not physical function are associated with worse mental health, in women with chronic widespread pain – a mixed method study. Paper presented at Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2019), Madrid, Spain, June 12-15, 2019. Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, 78(Suppl 2), 2159-2159
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Passive coping strategies but not physical function are associated with worse mental health, in women with chronic widespread pain – a mixed method study
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2019 (English)In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 78, no Suppl 2, p. 2159-2159Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Chronic widespread pain (CWP) is a common condition (approximately 10% prevalence), that affects women twice as often as men. There is a lack of knowledge in how different coping strategies relates to health status during CWP development in a general population.

Objectives: To explore different ways of coping with CWP and to relate the different coping strategies to health-related factors, before and after developing CWP.

Methods: A sequential explorative mixed methods study including 19 women 45-67 of age, who had reported CWP in a survey 2016, but not in 1995. Individual interviews were analysed with a phenomenographic approach, and resulted in four categories of coping strategies. These categories were further explored with regard to four dimensions of health status (physical function, bodily pain, vitality and mental health) as measured by SF-36 (0-100, a lower score indicates more disability) and sleep problems measured both in 1995, and 2016.

Results: The qualitative analysis revealed four categories representing different coping strategies, where each woman was labelled by the most dominant category; the mastering woman, the persistent woman, the compliant woman and the conquered woman. The first two categories emerged as being active coping strategies, and the latter two as passive. Women with passive strategies reported significantly lower vitality (median 57.5 vs 75, p=0.007) and worse mental health (median 54 vs 93, p=0.021) in 1995, before they had developed CWP compared with those with active coping strategies. No differences were seen between the groups on physical function, bodily pain or sleep.

In 2016, there were still a difference between the passive and active group regarding mental health (median 56 vs 80, p=0.022), but not for vitality (median 35 vs 40, p=0.707). No differences were seen between the groups on physical function or bodily pain. All eight women with passive strategies reported problems with sleep in 2016, as compared to 6 of the 11 women with active strategies (p=0.045).

Conclusion: Women that reported CWP in 2016, but not in 1995, described both active and passive coping strategies. The qualitative findings were associated with differences in vitality and mental health already in 1995, before they had developed CWP. Further, those with passive coping strategies reported worse health with regard to mental health and sleep problems in 2016. Interestingly, the groups did not differ in bodily pain or physical function neither in 1995 nor in 2016, which implicates the importance for the clinician to take the typical coping strategy into consideration, when meeting these patients in clinical settings. © Aili, Bergman, Bremander, Haglund & Larsson 2019. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London, UK: BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2019
Keywords
Chronic widespread pain, health, mental health, coping
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-40949 (URN)10.1136/annrheumdis-2019-eular.5393 (DOI)
Conference
Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2019), Madrid, Spain, June 12-15, 2019
Available from: 2019-11-14 Created: 2019-11-14 Last updated: 2019-11-27Bibliographically approved
Aili, K., Bergman, S., Bremander, A., Haglund, E. & Larsson, I. (2019). Passive coping strategies but not physicalfunction are associated with worse mental health, in women with chronicwidespread pain– a mixed method study. In: Annual Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases: . Paper presented at Annual European Congress of Rheumatology EULAR. , Article ID A2159.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Passive coping strategies but not physicalfunction are associated with worse mental health, in women with chronicwidespread pain– a mixed method study
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2019 (English)In: Annual Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, 2019, article id A2159Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Background: Chronic widespread pain (CWP) is a common condition (approximately 10% prevalence), that affects women twice as often as men. There is a lack of knowledge in how different coping strategies relates to health status during CWP development in a general population.

Objectives: To explore different ways of coping with CWP and to relate the different coping strategies to health-related factors, before and after developing CWP.

Methods: A sequential explorative mixed methods study including 19 women 45-67 of age, who had reported CWP in a survey 2016, but not in 1995. Individual interviews were analysed with a phenomenographic approach, and resulted in four categories of coping strategies. These categories were further explored with regard to four dimensions of health status (physical function, bodily pain, vitality and mental health) as measured by SF-36 (0-100, a lower score indicates more disability) and sleep problems measured both in 1995, and 2016.

Results: The qualitative analysis revealed four categories representing different coping strategies, where each woman was labelled by the most dominant category; the mastering woman, the persistent woman, the compliant woman and the conquered woman. The first two categories emerged as being active coping strategies, and the latter two as passive. Women with passive strategies reported significantly lower vitality (median 57.5 vs 75, p=0.007) and worse mental health (median 54 vs 93, p=0.021) in 1995, before they had developed CWP compared with those with active coping strategies. No differences were seen between the groups on physical function, bodily pain or sleep.

In 2016, there were still a difference between the passive and active group regarding mental health (median 56 vs 80, p=0.022), but not for vitality (median 35 vs 40, p=0.707). No differences were seen between the groups on physical function or bodily pain. All eight women with passive strategies reported problems with sleep in 2016, as compared to 6 of the 11 women with active strategies (p=0.045).

Conclusion: Women that reported CWP in 2016, but not in 1995, described both active and passive coping strategies. The qualitative findings were associated with differences in vitality and mental health already in 1995, before they had developed CWP. Further, those with passive coping strategies reported worse health with regard to mental health and sleep problems in 2016. Interestingly, the groups did not differ in bodily pain or physical function neither in 1995 nor in 2016, which implicates the importance for the clinician to take the typical coping strategy into consideration, when meeting these patients in clinical settings.

Keywords
chronic widespread pain
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-40913 (URN)10.1136/annrheumdis-2019-eular.5393 (DOI)
Conference
Annual European Congress of Rheumatology EULAR
Available from: 2019-11-12 Created: 2019-11-12 Last updated: 2019-11-12
Mogard, E., Bremander, A. & Haglund, E. (2019). The combined effects of lifestyle habits on health-related quality of life, physical and mental functions in patients with spondyloarthritis. Paper presented at Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2019), Madrid, Spain, June 12-15, 2019. Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, 78(Suppl 2), 2144-2144
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The combined effects of lifestyle habits on health-related quality of life, physical and mental functions in patients with spondyloarthritis
2019 (English)In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 78, no Suppl 2, p. 2144-2144Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Earlier studies have found strong correlations between worse health and an unhealthy lifestyle, such as not meeting recommendations of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, being overweight or obese and the use of tobacco in patients with spondyloarthritis (SpA). The impact of more than one unhealthy lifestyle habit (LsH) is however, scarcely described.

Objectives: To study the combined effects of unhealthy LsHs on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and physical and mental functions in patients with SpA. Differences between SpA subgroups and gender were also studied.

Methods: Postal questionnaires were in 2009 and 2011 sent to all patients diagnosed with SpA and registered in the Skane Healthcare Register. This study included patients who at both time points responded to the survey, were ≥20 years, and had ankylosing spondylitits (AS), psoriatic arthritis (PsA) or undifferentiated spondyloarthritis (USpA). Cross-sectional data from the 2011 questionnaire were available for 1601 patients (AS n=455, PsA n=883, USpA n=263), with a mean age of 58 (13) years (52% women). Self-reported levels of weekly physical activity at moderate or vigorous intensity, (MVPA), use of tobacco (cigarettes and/or snuff) and BMI (overweight or obese) were dichotomized as “healthy” or “unhealthy”. The number of unhealthy LsH were then summarized and stratified into four groups (scoring 0-3, 0=no unhealthy LsH). HRQoL was assessed with EQ-5D (0-1, worst-best), and physical function with BASFI. Disease activity (BASDAI), pain, fatigue (0-10, best-worst), anxiety, and depression (HADa/d) (0-21, no distress-maximum distress) were also measured. Statistical analyses were performed with Chi Square test and ANOVA.

Results: Fourteen percent (n=226) reported none of the studied unhealthy LsH, while 35% (n=555) reported one, 38% (n=611) two, and 13% (n=209) three unhealthy LsH. Reports of one and more unhealthy LsH had increasing negative impact on HRQoL (from mean 0.74 (SD 0.19) to 0.57 (0.30)), disease activity (from 3.2 (2.1) to 4.5 (2.3)), physical function (2.3 (2.1) to 4.4 (2.6)), VAS-pain (3.4 (2.3) to 4.8 (2.5)), VAS-fatigue (4.2 (2.7) to 5.5 (2.7)), anxiety (4.8 (4.2) to 5.6 (4.4)) and depression (3.3 (3.3) to 4.8 (3.8)) in patients with SpA (p=0.019-<0.001).

Patients with PsA (p≤0.001) and men (p=0.040) reported more often ≥2 unhealthy LsHs, while patients with USpA were least likely to have ≥2 unhealthy LsHs (Figure 1,2). The negative impact on HRQoL, physical and mental functions still remained significant when stratified into different SpA subgroups and gender, except for anxiety in women, and for patients with PsA or USpA.

Conclusion: Our findings support that the combined effect of unhealthy lifestyle habits have negative impact on many aspects of health. There is a need for interventions aiming at screening for not only one but several unhealthy lifestyle habits combined, and to offer coaching to increase behavioral change and promote better health. © Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2019. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London, UK: BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2019
Keywords
lifestyle habits, spondyloarthritis
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-41225 (URN)10.1136/annrheumdis-2019-eular.1985 (DOI)000472207106414 ()
Conference
Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2019), Madrid, Spain, June 12-15, 2019
Available from: 2019-12-10 Created: 2019-12-10 Last updated: 2019-12-11Bibliographically approved
Haglund, E., Bremander, A. & Bergman, S. (2019). The StarT back screening tool and a pain mannequin improve triage in individuals with low back pain at risk of a worse prognosis - a population based cohort study. BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, 20(1), Article ID 460.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The StarT back screening tool and a pain mannequin improve triage in individuals with low back pain at risk of a worse prognosis - a population based cohort study
2019 (English)In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 20, no 1, article id 460Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: The STarT Back Screening Tool (SBT) identifies patients with low back pain (LBP) at risk of a worse prognosis of persistent disabling back pain, and thereby facilitates triage to appropriate treatment level. However, the SBT does not consider the pain distribution, which is a known predictor of chronic widespread pain (CWP). The aim of this study was to determine if screening by the SBT and screening of multisite chronic widespread pain (MS-CWP) could identity individuals with a worse prognosis. A secondary aim was to analyze self-reported health in individuals with and without LBP, in relation to the combination of these two screening tools.

METHODS: One hundred and nineteen individuals (aged 40-71 years, mean (SD) 59 (8) years), 52 with LBP and 67 references, answered two screening tools; the SBT and a pain mannequin - as well as a questionnaire addressing self-reported health. The SBT stratifies into low, medium or high risk of a worse prognosis. The pain mannequin stratifies into either presence or absence of CWP in combination with ≥7 painful areas of pain (0-18), here defined as MS-CWP (high risk of worse prognosis). The two screening tools were studied one-by-one, and as a combined screening. For statistical analyses, independent t-tests and Chi-square tests were used.

RESULTS: Both the SBT and the pain mannequin identified risk of a worse prognosis in individuals with (p = 0.007) or without (p = 0.001) LBP. We found that the screening tools identified partly different individuals at risk. The SBT identified one individual, while the pain mannequin identified 21 (19%). When combining the two screening methods, 21 individuals (17%) were at high risk of a worse prognosis. When analyzing differences between individuals at high risk (combined SBT and MS-CWP) with those at low risk, individuals at high risk reported worse health (p = 0.013 - < 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS: Both screening tools identified individuals at risk, but they captured different aspects, and also different number of individuals at high risk of a worse prognosis. Thus, using a combination may improve early detection and facilitate triage to appropriate treatment level with multimodal approach also in those otherwise missed by the SBT. 

© The Author(s). 2019

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: BioMed Central, 2019
Keywords
Chronic widespread pain, Low back pain, Multisite pain, Population-based cohort, Prognostic indicators, Questionnaire
National Category
Rheumatology and Autoimmunity
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-41221 (URN)10.1186/s12891-019-2836-1 (DOI)000491317600003 ()31638972 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85073725359 (Scopus ID)
Funder
AFA Insurance
Note

Funding: Swedish Rheumatism Association and Region Halland, Sweden 

Available from: 2019-12-10 Created: 2019-12-10 Last updated: 2019-12-11Bibliographically approved
Törnblom, M., Andersson, M., Trulsson Schouenborg, A. & Haglund, E. (2019). Validation of the Test for Substitution Patterns - in individuals with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis. Paper presented at Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2019), Madrid, Spain, June 12-15, 2019. Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, 78(Suppl 2), 0712-0712
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Validation of the Test for Substitution Patterns - in individuals with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis
2019 (English)In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 78, no Suppl 2, p. 0712-0712Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Few tools evaluates quality of movements in individuals with knee osteoarthritis (OA). The Test for Substitution Patterns (TSP) is developed to measure the ability to perform five functional movements regarding postural control and altered movement patterns (1). TSP is validated and reliable in individuals with anterior cruciate ligament injury, but has not yet been evaluated in individuals with knee OA.

Objectives: To study the relationships between the OA modified TSP (OA-TSP) and self-reported knee function as measured with the Knee Injury and osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) and the 30-s chair stand test (30-s CST) in individuals with symptomatic knee OA. A second aim was to study the discriminative ability of the OA-TSP for unilateral knee pain.

Methods: Sixty-two individuals with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis were included using consecutive sampling. Health status was assessed with the EuroQol five dimension scale (EQ5D, 0-1 worst-best), and knee function in five subscales for KOOS (pain, symptoms, ADL, quality of life and sport/recreation, 0-100 worst-best). The 30-s CST-test measured the number of rises in 30 seconds. In the OA-TSP, substitution patterns are observed and scored from 0-3 (no substitution pattern-poorly performed) during five standardized functional movements. The maximum score is 54 points/side with score of 108 points. Median and min-max were used for all descriptive data. Spearman´s correlation and Wilcoxon signed rank test were used for analyzes. A correlation coefficient rs ≥±0.50 is considered large, ±0.30 to < 0.50 moderate and ±0.10 < 0.30 small.

Results: The median age was 54 years (30-61), 76% were women. The median Body Mass Index was 25 (18-48) and EQ5D 0.8 (0.29-1.00). There were no significant differences between the gender regarding BMI and EQ5D. Median OA-TSP total score was 29 (10-70). Median KOOS pain was 75 (36-100), symptoms 71 (21-96), ADL 87 (30-100), and sport/rec 50 (0-100). In the 30-s CST the median was 16 raises (5-32). Moderate, significant correlations were observed between TSP total score and KOOS pain and KOOS ADL (rs=-0.30; p=0.03, rs=-0.35; p=0.01 respectively) and small correlations between TSP and KOOS sport/recreation and KOOS symptoms (rs=-0.13; p=0.36, rs=-0.22; p=0.11 respectively). There was a moderate, significant correlation between TSP total score and 30-s CST (rs=-0.34; p<0.01). Discriminative ability for the TSP for unilateral knee pain was found to be significant worse in the painful side, with median 18 (2-36) vs. 14 (7-37) in the not painful side, p=0.001.

Conclusion: The OA-TSP could be used as a functional test to detect altered knee alignment interpreted as an early sign of knee OA and assist the physiotherapist in functional testing during the rehabilitation of individuals with symptomatic knee OA.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London, UK: BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2019
Keywords
osteoarthritis, cohort study, quality of movement
National Category
Orthopaedics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-41224 (URN)000472207104306 ()
Conference
Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2019), Madrid, Spain, June 12-15, 2019
Projects
Halländska knä OA (Osteoarthritis) kohorten HALLOA
Available from: 2019-12-10 Created: 2019-12-10 Last updated: 2019-12-11Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-1445-5247

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