hh.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 36) Show all publications
Bergman, S., Haglund, E., Aili, K., Olsson, C. & Bremander, A. (2018). Chronic widespread pain, sleep problems and pressure pain thresholds in a population sample. Paper presented at EULAR, Annual European Congress of Rheumatology, 13-16 June, 2018 Amsterdam, Netherlands. Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, 7(2), 1645-1646
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Chronic widespread pain, sleep problems and pressure pain thresholds in a population sample
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 1645-1646Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2018
National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-38548 (URN)10.1136/annrheumdis-2018-eular.6827 (DOI)000444351005059 ()
Conference
EULAR, Annual European Congress of Rheumatology, 13-16 June, 2018 Amsterdam, Netherlands
Available from: 2018-12-13 Created: 2018-12-13 Last updated: 2018-12-13Bibliographically approved
Karlsson, J., Winroth, J., Bremander, A., Haglund, E., Holmquist, M., Lindgren, E.-C., . . . Staland Nyman, C. (2018). Förändringsledarskap vid digital transformation inom vård och omsorg: En sammanfattande rapport från kompetensutvecklingsprojektet ”Trygg motivation och inspiration” i Kungsbacka kommun 2018. Halmstad
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Förändringsledarskap vid digital transformation inom vård och omsorg: En sammanfattande rapport från kompetensutvecklingsprojektet ”Trygg motivation och inspiration” i Kungsbacka kommun 2018
Show others...
2018 (Swedish)Report (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Halmstad: , 2018. p. 49
Keywords
Digitalisering, förändringsledarskap, hälsa, arbetsmiljö, lärande, kompetensutveckling, aktionsforskning
National Category
Work Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-38303 (URN)
Projects
HIcube Kompetenta vården
Funder
European Social Fund (ESF)
Available from: 2018-11-11 Created: 2018-11-11 Last updated: 2019-05-27Bibliographically approved
Bremander, A., Haglund, E. & Bergman, S. (2018). Measures of Physical Activity and Fear Avoidance in People with Chronic Pain. Paper presented at Annual European Congress of Rheumatology EULAR, Amsterdam, Netherlands, 13-16 June, 2018. Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, 77(Suppl. 2), 1829-1830, Article ID SAT0737-HPR.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Measures of Physical Activity and Fear Avoidance in People with Chronic Pain
2018 (English)In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 77, no Suppl. 2, p. 1829-1830, article id SAT0737-HPRArticle in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background Lifestyle factors such as physical activity (PA) has the possibility to contribute to improved health and quality of life in the population as well as in chronic diseases. Most often PA is self-reported while measures of the aerobic capacity are more seldom measured in subjects with chronic pain.

Objectives To describe physical activity levels (self-reported and aerobic capacity) in people with chronic pain classified as regional or widespread and to compare the findings with a group that report no pain.

Methods From the 2016 follow-up of the Swedish population based Epipain cohort (n 1321), 146 subjects were invited to a clinical assessment where the aerobic capacity was assessed by using a submaximal bicycle test, the Ekblom-Bak test, together with assessment of the Borg scale for perceived exertion (RPE). Aerobic capacity was also classified as low, average or high according to data from the general population. Self-reported physical activity was coded as MVPArec if recommended levels of PA was reported (physically active on a moderate level ≥150 min/week (MPA) or on an vigorous level ≥75 min/week (VPA) or not). The Fear Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire for PA (FABQ-PA, 0–24 best to worst) and for work (FABQ-W, 0–48 best to worst) were also assessed. The participants were classified as having chronic widespread pain (CWP), chronic regional pain (CRP) or no chronic pain (NCP) based on a pain mannequin presenting 0–18 pain regions and if pain had lasted for 3 months or more. Chi2 and Kruskal-Wallis tests were performed to study differences between the three pain groups.

Results 141/146 (97%) subjects (mean (SD) age 59.4 (8.2) years) whereof 61% were women, could be classified into pain groups; 43 as CWP (84% women), 43 as CRP (42% women) and 55 as NCP (58% women). The group with CWP was slightly older than those with CRP (mean (SD) age 57.0 (7.6) years vs. 61.9 (6.9) years, p 0.02). The CWP group also had lower aerobic capacity (mean (SD) 2.2 (0.5) l/min vs. 2.6 (0.6) l/min, p 0.03), and a larger proportion was classified as having low aerobic capacity (CWP 21%, CRP 7% and NCP 10%, p 0.04). The proportion of MVPArec did not differ between the groups; CWP 70%, CRP 81% and NCP 74% (p 0.5). There was neither a difference between the groups in BMI, RPE or in sitting hours/week (p>0.6). However, differences were found in the FABQ where in the PA scale those with CRP had worse scores compared with NCP (mean (SD) 11.2 (7.3) vs. 6.0 (6.0), p<0.001), the difference between CWP (mean (SD) 8.9 (6.7)) and NCP was p 0.06. In the work subscale of FABQ, CWP had worse scores compared with CRP (mean (SD) 18.9 (15.7) vs. 10.0 (12.5), p 0.002) and CRP had worse scores compared to those with NCP (mean (SD) 10.0 (12.5) vs. 6.5 (9.1), p<0.001).

Conclusions In this sample of subjects with chronic pain or no pain, having widespread pain tended to affect the aerobic capacity negatively while self-reports of reaching recommended levels of physical activity did not differ between groups. Fear avoidance in relation to physical activity and especially in relation to work was more noticeable in subjects with chronic pain compared to those with no pain. Measures of aerobic capacity and information of fear avoidance beliefs might help health professionals to better tailor the non-pharmacological treatment for subjects with chronic pain.

Disclosure of Interest None declared

© 2018, Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2018
National Category
Clinical Medicine Rheumatology and Autoimmunity
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-36809 (URN)
Conference
Annual European Congress of Rheumatology EULAR, Amsterdam, Netherlands, 13-16 June, 2018
Available from: 2018-05-23 Created: 2018-05-23 Last updated: 2018-07-30Bibliographically approved
Aili, K., Andersson, M., Bremander, A., Haglund, E. & Bergman, S. (2018). Sleep problems and fatigue as a predictor for the onset of chronic widespread pain over a 5- and 18-year perspective: a 20-year prospective study. Paper presented at Annual European Congress of Rheumatology EULAR, Amsterdam, Netherlands, 13-16 June, 2018. Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, 77(Suppl. 2), 87-87
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sleep problems and fatigue as a predictor for the onset of chronic widespread pain over a 5- and 18-year perspective: a 20-year prospective study
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 77, no Suppl. 2, p. 87-87Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: If localised pain represent one end of a pain spectra, with overall better general health, chronic widespread pain (CWP) and fibromyalgia represent the other end of the spectra with worse general health and more comorbidities with other somatic diseases and mental illness. Sleep problems and fatigue are common among individuals reporting CWP and previous research indicate that sleep problems may be an important predictor for pain prognosis.

Objectives: The aim of this population-based study was to investigate if sleep problems and fatigue predict the onset of CWP 5 and 18 years later.

Methods: In order to get more stable baseline classifications of CWP, a wash-out period was used, including only individuals who had not reported CWP (according to ACR 1990 criteria for fibromyalgia) at baseline (−98) and three years prior baseline (−95). In all, data from 1249 individuals entered the analyses for the 5 year follow-up (−03) and 791 entered for the 18 year follow-up (−16). Four parameters related to sleep (difficulties initiating sleep, maintaining sleep, early morning awakening and non-restorative sleep), and one parameter related to fatigue (SF-36 vitality scale) were investigated as predictors for CWP. Binary logistic regression analysis were used for analyses.

Results: All investigated parameters predicted the onset of CWP five years later (problems with initiating sleep (OR 1.91; 1.16–3.14), maintaining sleep (OR 1.85; 1.14–3.01), early awakening (OR 2.0; 1.37–3.75), non-restorative sleep (OR 2.27; 1.37–3.75) and fatigue (OR 3.70; 1.76–7.84)) in a model adjusted for age, gender, socio-economy and mental health. All parameters except problems with early awakening predicted the onset of CWP also 18 years later. In all, 785 individuals did not report any of the sleeping problems at baseline (fatigue not included), 268 reported one of the problems, 167 two, 128 three and 117 subjects reported to have all four sleep problems. Reporting all four sleep problems was significantly associated with CWP at follow-up at both time points when adjusting for age, gender, socio economy and mental health (OR 4.00; 2.03–7.91 and OR 3.95; 1.90–8.20); adjusting for age, gender, socio economy and number of pain regions (OR 2.94; 1.48–5.82 and OR 2.65; 1.24–5.64) and in a model adjusting for age, gender, socio economy and pain severity (OR 2.97;1.53–5.76; and OR 3.02;1.47–6.21) for the 5 year and 18 year follow-up respectively, compared to not reporting any of the sleep problems at baseline.

Conclusions: Both sleeping problems and fatigue predicts the onset of CWP 5- and 18 years later. The results highlight the importance of the assessment of sleep quality in the clinic.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2018
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-38333 (URN)
Conference
Annual European Congress of Rheumatology EULAR, Amsterdam, Netherlands, 13-16 June, 2018
Available from: 2018-11-14 Created: 2018-11-14 Last updated: 2018-11-15Bibliographically approved
Aili, K., Andersson, M., Bremander, A., Haglund, E., Larsson, I. & Bergman, S. (2018). Sleep problems and fatigue as a predictor for the onset of chronic widespread painover a 5- and 18-year perspective: a 20-year prospective study. Paper presented at Annual European Congress of Rheumatology EULAR, Amsterdam, Netherlands, 13-16 June, 2018. Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, 77, 87-87, Article ID OP0072.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sleep problems and fatigue as a predictor for the onset of chronic widespread painover a 5- and 18-year perspective: a 20-year prospective study
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 77, p. 87-87, article id OP0072Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: If localised pain represent one end of a pain spectra, with overall better general health, chronic widespread pain (CWP) and fibromyalgia represent the other end of the spectra with worse general health and more comorbidities with other somatic diseases and mental illness. Sleep problems and fatigue are common among individuals reporting CWP and previous research indicate that sleep problems may be an important predictor for pain prognosis.

Objectives: The aim of this population-based study was to investigate if sleep problems and fatigue predict the onset of CWP 5 and 18 years later.

Methods: In order to get more stable baseline classifications of CWP, a wash-out period was used, including only individuals who had not reported CWP (according to ACR 1990 criteria for fibromyalgia) at baseline (−98) and three years prior baseline (−95). In all, data from 1249 individuals entered the analyses for the 5 year follow-up (−03) and 791 entered for the 18 year follow-up (−16). Four parameters related to sleep (difficulties initiating sleep, maintaining sleep, early morning awakening and non-restorative sleep), and one parameter related to fatigue (SF-36 vitality scale) were investigated as predictors for CWP. Binary logistic regression analysis were used for analyses.

Results: All investigated parameters predicted the onset of CWP five years later (problems with initiating sleep (OR 1.91; 1.16–3.14), maintaining sleep (OR 1.85; 1.14–3.01), early awakening (OR 2.0; 1.37–3.75), non-restorative sleep (OR 2.27; 1.37–3.75) and fatigue (OR 3.70; 1.76–7.84)) in a model adjusted for age, gender, socio-economy and mental health. All parameters except problems with early awakening predicted the onset of CWP also 18 years later. In all, 785 individuals did not report any of the sleeping problems at baseline (fatigue not included), 268 reported one of the problems, 167 two, 128 three and 117 subjects reported to have all four sleep problems. Reporting all four sleep problems was significantly associated with CWP at follow-up at both time points when adjusting for age, gender, socio economy and mental health (OR 4.00; 2.03–7.91 and OR 3.95; 1.90–8.20); adjusting for age, gender, socio economy and number of pain regions (OR 2.94; 1.48–5.82 and OR 2.65; 1.24–5.64) and in a model adjusting for age, gender, socio economy and pain severity (OR 2.97;1.53–5.76; and OR 3.02;1.47–6.21) for the 5 year and 18 year follow-up respectively, compared to not reporting any of the sleep problems at baseline.

Conclusions: Both sleeping problems and fatigue predicts the onset of CWP 5- and 18 years later. The results highlight the importance of the assessment of sleep quality in the clinic.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2018
Keywords
Chronic widespread pain, Sleep problems
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-37138 (URN)
Conference
Annual European Congress of Rheumatology EULAR, Amsterdam, Netherlands, 13-16 June, 2018
Available from: 2018-06-18 Created: 2018-06-18 Last updated: 2018-07-26Bibliographically approved
Aili, K., Andersson, M., Bremander, A., Haglund, E., Larsson, I. & Bergman, S. (2018). Sleep problems and fatigue as predictorsfor the onset of chronic widespread painover a 5- and 18-year perspective. BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, 19(1), 1-14
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sleep problems and fatigue as predictorsfor the onset of chronic widespread painover a 5- and 18-year perspective
Show others...
2018 (English)In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Previous research suggests that sleep problems may be an important predictor for chronic widespread pain (CWP). With this study we investigated both sleep problems and fatigue as predictors for the onset of CWP over a 5-year and an 18-year perspective in a population free from CWP at baseline.

Methods: To get a more stable classification of CWP, we used a wash-out period, including only individuals who had not reported CWP at baseline (1998) and three years prior baseline (1995). In all, data from 1249 individuals entered the analyses for the 5-year follow-up and 791 entered for the 18-year follow-up. Difficulties initiating sleep, maintaining sleep, early morning awakening, non-restorative sleep and fatigue were investigated as predictors separately and simultaneously in binary logistic regression analyses.

Results: The results showed that problems with initiating sleep, maintaining sleep, early awakening and non-restorative sleep predicted the onset of CWP over a 5-year (OR 1.85 to OR 2.27) and 18-year (OR 1.54 to OR 2.25) perspective irrespective of mental health (assessed by SF-36) at baseline. Also fatigue predicted the onset of CWP over the two-time perspectives (OR 3.70 and OR 2.36 respectively) when adjusting for mental health. Overall the effect of the sleep problems and fatigue on new onset CWP (over a 5-year perspective) was somewhat attenuated when adjusting for pain at baseline but remained significant for problems with early awakening, non-restorative sleep and fatigue. Problems with maintaining sleep predicted CWP 18 years later irrespective of mental health and number of pain regions (OR 1.72). Reporting simultaneous problems with all four aspects of sleep was associated with the onset of CWP over a five-year and 18-yearperspective, irrespective of age, gender, socio economy, mental health and pain at baseline. Sleep problems and fatigue predicted the onset of CWP five years later irrespective of each other.

Conclusion: Sleep problems and fatigue were both important predictors for the onset of CWP over a five-year perspective. Sleep problems was a stronger predictor in a longer time-perspective. The results highlight the importance of the assessment of sleep quality and fatigue in the clinic. © The Author(s). 2018

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: BioMed Central, 2018
Keywords
Musculoskeletal pain, Insomnia, CWP, Prospective study, Longitudinal study, Population study
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-38256 (URN)10.1186/s12891-018-2310-5 (DOI)30390670 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-11-05 Created: 2018-11-05 Last updated: 2018-11-08Bibliographically approved
Bremander, A., Haglund, E., Bergman, S. & Ndosi, M. E. (2018). The educational needs of patients with undifferentiated spondyloarthritis: Validation of the ENAT questionnaire and needs assessment. Musculoskeletal Care, 16(2), 313-317
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The educational needs of patients with undifferentiated spondyloarthritis: Validation of the ENAT questionnaire and needs assessment
2018 (English)In: Musculoskeletal Care, ISSN 1478-2189, E-ISSN 1557-0681, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 313-317Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: The aim of the present study was to validate the Swedish version of the educational needs assessment tool (SwENAT) in undifferentiated spondyloarthritis (USpA) and use it to study the educational needs of patients with USpA.

METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study, recruiting a random sample of patients with USpA from a hospital register in Sweden. Educational needs data were collected, together with disease activity and function indices (Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index [BASDAI] and Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index [BASFI]). Rasch analysis was utilized to evaluate the construct validity, internal consistency and unidimensionality of the SwENAT before studying differences in educational needs between patient subgroups (gender, age and disease severity).

RESULTS: = 11.488; p = 0.119), including strict unidimensionality. Overall, the mean (SD) SwENAT score was 86 (32). Women reported higher needs than men in the domains of pain (mean [SD] 13.1 [6.8] versus 10.1 [6.0]; p = 0.05); movement (mean [SD] 13.0 [5.5] versus 9.9 [5.7]; p = 0.02) and self-help (mean [SD] 17.0 [5.8] versus 14.1 [5.0]; p = 0.03). Higher disease activity (BASDAI >4) was associated with higher educational needs (mean [SD] 92.6 [31.9] versus 73.7 [29.4]; p = 0.02).

CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that the SwENAT is valid in USpA. Women and patients with higher disease activity are more likely to have high levels of educational needs, so special attention and strategies to target patient education are warranted. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford: John Wiley & Sons, 2018
Keywords
arthritis, outcome measures, patient education
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-36803 (URN)10.1002/msc.1231 (DOI)000435802900009 ()29417718 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85041661821 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding: The Swedish Rheumatism Association and Region Halland, Sweden.

Available from: 2018-05-23 Created: 2018-05-23 Last updated: 2018-11-21Bibliographically approved
Aili, K., Bergman, S., Bremander, A., Haglund, E. & Larsson, I. (2018). Women’s experiences of coping with chronic widespread pain: – a qualitative study. Paper presented at Annual European Congress of Rheumatology EULAR, Amsterdam, Netherlands, 13-16 June, 2018. Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, 77, 1815-1815, Article ID FRI10737-HPR.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Women’s experiences of coping with chronic widespread pain: – a qualitative study
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 77, p. 1815-1815, article id FRI10737-HPRArticle in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Approximately ten percent of the population report chronic widespread pain (CWP), the condition is more common among women than men. For most people, the pain interferes with many aspects of every-day life and implies large consequences. However, the group reporting CWP is heterogeneous and there is a need for better understanding of the different strategies used for coping with pain in every-day life.

Objectives: The purpose of this study was to describe women’s experiences of how to cope with CWP.

Methods: The study had a descriptive design with a qualitative content analysis approach. Individual interviews were conducted with 19 women, 31–66 of age, who had reported CWP in a survey 2016. CWP was defined according to the 1990 ACR criteria for fibromyalgia. To be considered chronic, the pain should have persisted for more than three months during the last 12 months. A manifest qualitative content analysis was used to analyze the main question “How do you cope with your chronic widespread pain?” The analysis resulted in four categories.

Results: Women described their coping with CWP in four different ways; to take control, to continue as usual, to follow instructions and to rest. To take control meant to make deliberate decisions to handle everyday day life. It also meant to take care of oneself, to think positive and to exercise at an adequate level. To continue as usual meant not to listen to body signals and either to ignore or accept the pain. To follow instructions meant listening to the health professionals and following advices, but without taking any part of the responsibility for the treatment outcome. To rest meant to perceive an unreasonable need for recovery, to resign and let the pain set the terms for the daily living.

Conclusions: Women expressed different ways of coping with CWP including both active and passive strategies. The coping strategies included two dimensions, where one ranged from actively taking control over the pain, to passively following instructions and the other from actively continue as usual by either accepting or ignoring the pain to passively rest and being mastered by pain.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2018
Keywords
chronic widespread pain, women’s experiences, qualitative study
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-37135 (URN)
Conference
Annual European Congress of Rheumatology EULAR, Amsterdam, Netherlands, 13-16 June, 2018
Available from: 2018-06-18 Created: 2018-06-18 Last updated: 2018-07-27Bibliographically approved
Hagel, S. & Haglund, E. (2017). Content Validity of the Arthritis Self-Efficacy Scale. Paper presented at Reumadagarna 2017, Västerås, Sweden, 13-15 september, 2017. Reumabulletinen (119; 4), 59-60, Article ID 93.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Content Validity of the Arthritis Self-Efficacy Scale
2017 (English)In: Reumabulletinen, ISSN 2000-2246, no 119; 4, p. 59-60, article id 93Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Appropriate evaluation is important to optimize health care interventions and to understand patient’s experiences of their situation. Self-efficacy has been proven to have impact on pain, fatigue, physical activity and on cardiovascular risk in patients with inflammatory arthritides, and adequate evaluation is important. The arthritis self-efficacy scale (ASES) is one patient reported outcome measure recommended for evaluation of self-efficacy in arthritides. The aim of this study was to start analyzing the content validity of the ASES through linking to the International Classification of Functioning (ICF), and by using the proposed structure for personal factors (PF).

Material and methods: The linking to the ICF was performed through identification of each meaningful concept of heading, introduction and all question including answering options of the ASES subscales for pain and symptoms. Each identified meaningful concept was linked to the third level ICF domain, according to established linking rules. Concepts identified as potential personal factors were sorted into the proposed structure of personal factors (Geyh, 2011) when applicable. The two authors independently identified meaningful concepts and performed the linking to the ICF, and sorted into the structure of personal factors (PF). Disagreements were discussed thoroughly, and reviewed until consensus was reached.    

Results: The ASES subscales for pain and symptom comprised 5 and 6 questions respectively. All questions were linked to the ICF domain body functions, at a minimum through each answering option that was linked to the b126 “temperament and personality functions”. Other body function domains covered were b130 (energy and drive functions), b134 (sleep functions), b152 (emotional functions), b160 (thought functions) and b280 (pain).

Seven questions and the introduction of the ASES subscales for pain and symptom were linked to the ICF domain activity and participation (3 and 4 questions respectively).  Five questions were linked to d570 (looking after one’s health), while d220 (undertaking multiple tasks) and d230 (carrying out daily routine) were captured by both subscales although somewhat less well represented.

Three questions were linked to the ICF domain environmental factors. Two ASES pain questions were linked to e110 (products and substances for personal consumption) while one ASES symptom question was linked to e425 (individual attitudes of acquaintances, peers, colleagues, neighbors and community members).

Personal factors were identified in both ASES subscales. The answering options for all questions except two could be sorted into the PF concept “feelings”, the headings, introductions and six questions could be sorted into the PF concept “patterns of experience and behavior”, and three questions could be sorted into “thoughts and beliefs”.

Conclusion: The ASES subscales for pain and symptom showed satisfying content validity since important constructs on all ICF domains (except for body structure) were included. Both ASES subscales also covered PF that contribute with important aspects on health, and impact of the disease, further improving the content validity. 

 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Svensk reumatologisk förening, 2017
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-35061 (URN)
Conference
Reumadagarna 2017, Västerås, Sweden, 13-15 september, 2017
Available from: 2017-09-22 Created: 2017-09-22 Last updated: 2017-10-09Bibliographically approved
Haglund, E., Bremander, A., Bergman, S. & Larsson, I. (2017). Educational needs in patients with spondyloarthritis in Sweden - a mixed-methods study. BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, 18(1), Article ID 335.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Educational needs in patients with spondyloarthritis in Sweden - a mixed-methods study
2017 (English)In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 18, no 1, article id 335Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: There is a demand for a flexible and individually tailored patient education to meet patients' specific needs and priorities, but this area has seldom been studied in patients with spondyloarthritis (SpA), a family of inflammatory rheumatic diseases. The aim of the present study was to identify needs and priorities in patient education in patients with SpA. A second aim was to investigate patients' experiences and preferences of receiving patient education.

METHODS: Data collection included a questionnaire survey with the Educational Needs Assessment Tool (ENAT) and interviews, using a mixed-methods design. Patients were identified through a specialist clinic register. Descriptive data are presented as mean with standard deviation, or frequencies. Chi-square test and independent-samples t-test were used for group comparisons. A manifest qualitative conventional content analysis was conducted to explore patients' experiences and needs in patient education, based on two focus groups (n = 6) and five individual interviews.

RESULTS: Almost half (43%) of the 183 SpA patients had educational needs, particularly regarding aspects of self-help, feelings, and the disease process. More educational needs were reported by women and in patients with higher disease activity, while duration of disease did not affect the needs. The qualitative analysis highlighted the importance of obtaining a guiding, reliable, and easily available patient education for management of SpA. Individual contacts with healthcare professionals were of importance, but newer media were also requested.

CONCLUSION: There are considerable educational needs in patients with SpA, and education concerning self-help, feelings, and the diseases process were raised as important issues. Healthcare professionals need to consider the importance of presenting varied formats of education based on the experiences and preferences of patients with SpA. © 2017 The Author(s).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: BioMed Central, 2017
Keywords
Ankylosing spondylitis, Interviews, Patient education, Patient-reported outcome measures, Spondyloarthritis, Undifferentiated spondyloarthritis
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-34942 (URN)10.1186/s12891-017-1689-8 (DOI)000407064300004 ()28768510 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85026660379 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding: Göteborgsregionens stiftelse för reumatologisk forskning, Sweden, and Region Halland, Sweden

Available from: 2017-09-13 Created: 2017-09-13 Last updated: 2018-10-29Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-1445-5247

Search in DiVA

Show all publications