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Weman Josefsson, KarinORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-4608-7300
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 63) Show all publications
Weman Josefsson, K. & Jonsson, L. (2023). Motivation inom idrotten (2ed.). In: Idrottens Ledarskap: (pp. 62-87). Stockholm: SISU Förlag
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Motivation inom idrotten
2023 (Swedish)In: Idrottens Ledarskap, Stockholm: SISU Förlag , 2023, 2, p. 62-87Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: SISU Förlag, 2023 Edition: 2
Keywords
motivation, träning, idrott, självbestämmandeteorin
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-50209 (URN)978-91-7727-095-9 (ISBN)
Available from: 2023-03-24 Created: 2023-03-24 Last updated: 2023-11-29Bibliographically approved
Weman Josefsson, K. & Berggren, T. (2023). Psykosocial arbetsmiljö och hälsa (2ed.). Lund: Studentlitteratur AB
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Psykosocial arbetsmiljö och hälsa
2023 (Swedish)Book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2023. p. 287 Edition: 2
Keywords
psykosocial arbetsmiljö, motivation, gränslöst arbete, hälsa
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Health Innovation
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-51897 (URN)9789144131573 (ISBN)
Available from: 2023-11-06 Created: 2023-11-06 Last updated: 2023-12-21Bibliographically approved
Niemiec, C. P., Ivarsson, A., Weman Josefsson, K., Smit, E. & Williams, G. C. (2023). Self-determination theory and the smoking cessation process: Daily electronic self-reports can identify the initiation of quit attempts. Patient Education and Counseling, 115, Article ID 107886.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Self-determination theory and the smoking cessation process: Daily electronic self-reports can identify the initiation of quit attempts
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2023 (English)In: Patient Education and Counseling, ISSN 0738-3991, E-ISSN 1873-5134, Vol. 115, article id 107886Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: To examine the motivational predictors of the smoking cessation process at the between-persons and within-persons levels.

Methods: Mediation analyses were conducted on self-report data (N = 236) that were collected using interval contingent sampling over a 39-day study period.

Results: There was a high rate of attrition, as nearly 50% of participants were lost to follow-up. There were credible indirect effects of autonomous self-regulation on smoking behavior on the next day and seven-day abstinence through perceived competence and medication use. At the between-persons level, these models explained 17% of the variance in smoking behavior on the next day and 31% of the variance in seven-day abstinence; at the within-persons level, these estimates were 39% and 57%, respectively.

Conclusions: Day-to-day changes in autonomous self-regulation, perceived competence, and medication use are important initiators of the smoking cessation process.Practice implicationsSmokers might be more likely to make a quit attempt if practitioners “tune into” the day-to-day fluctuations of their patients’ motivation for stopping smoking, perhaps using an electronic platform to assess and compare smokers’ current reports to their previous experiences. Such “motivational attunement” can afford practitioners an opportunity to provide need support when patients are willing and able to initiate a quit attempt. © 2023 Elsevier B.V.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Shannon: Elsevier, 2023
Keywords
Autonomous self-regulation, Interval contingent sampling, Perceived competence, Self-determination theory, Smoking cessation
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-51587 (URN)10.1016/j.pec.2023.107886 (DOI)37567038 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85167403450 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-09-07 Created: 2023-09-07 Last updated: 2023-11-01Bibliographically approved
Ivarsson, A., Stenling, A., Weman Josefsson, K., Höglind, S. & Lindwall, M. (2021). Associations between physical activity and core affects within and across days: a daily diary study. Psychology and Health, 36(1), 43-58
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Associations between physical activity and core affects within and across days: a daily diary study
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2021 (English)In: Psychology and Health, ISSN 0887-0446, E-ISSN 1476-8321, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 43-58Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: The objective of the present study was to investigate (a) if daily physical activity at the within-person level is related to four different core affects the same evening, (b) if core affects in the evening predict physical activity the following day, and (c) if physical activity predicts core affects the following day.

Design: A total of 166 university students were asked to complete the affect and physical activity measures once a day (in the evening), for seven days. Bivariate unconditional latent curve model analyses with structured residuals were performed to investigate the relations within days and across days between the core affects and physical activity.

Main outcome measures: Core affects and physical activity.

Results: Physical activity had positive within-day associations with pleasant-activated and pleasant-deactivated core affects and a negative within-day association with unpleasant-deactivated affective responses. There were, however, no statistically significant relations between core affects and physical activity across days.

Conclusion: These results highlight that the measurement interval might be an important factor that influences the association between core affects and physical activity behaviors. © 2020 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Abingdon: Routledge, 2021
Keywords
Core affects, intensive longitudinal design, latent curve model with structured residuals, physical activity
National Category
Psychology Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-41845 (URN)10.1080/08870446.2020.1745801 (DOI)000524110900001 ()2-s2.0-85082957362 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2017-00273Swedish National Centre for Research in Sports, P2016-0039
Available from: 2020-03-31 Created: 2020-03-31 Last updated: 2024-01-23Bibliographically approved
Rhodes, R. E., Boudreau, P., Weman Josefsson, K. & Ivarsson, A. (2021). Mediators of Physical Activity Behaviour Change Interventions among Adults: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Health Psychology Review, 15(2), 272-286
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mediators of Physical Activity Behaviour Change Interventions among Adults: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
2021 (Swedish)In: Health Psychology Review, ISSN 1743-7199, E-ISSN 1743-7202, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 272-286Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

An understanding of physical activity through mediators of behaviour change is important to evaluate the efficacy of interventions. The purpose of this review is to update prior reviews with meta-analysis to evaluate the state of physical activity interventions that include proposed mediators of behaviour change. Literature was identified through searching for five key databases. Studies were eligible if they described a published experimental or quasi-experimental trial in English examining the effect of an intervention on physical activity behaviour and mediators in non-clinical adult populations with the necessary statistical information to be included in the meta-analytic structural equation modelling analysis. Fifty-one articles (49 samples) met the eligibility criteria. Small overall effects were identified for mediation paths a (r = .16; 95% CI = .10 to .22), b (r = .21; 95% CI .16 to .27), and c (r = .24; 95% CI .12 to .35), c′ (r = .05 to .19) and ab (r = .02 to .07) that showed similar findings by theory and construct. The effect sizes seen in physical activity interventions are mediated by our current theories, but the effects are very small and no one construct/theory appears to be a critical driver of the mediated effect compared to any other. Innovation and increased fidelity of interventions is needed. © 2020 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge, 2021
Keywords
exercise, social cognitive theory, theory of planned behavior, self-determination theory
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-41264 (URN)10.1080/17437199.2019.1706614 (DOI)000506280800001 ()31875768 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85078608160 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding: Canadian Institutes of Health Research, the Canadian Cancer Society, the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, and the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada

Available from: 2019-12-16 Created: 2019-12-16 Last updated: 2021-06-18Bibliographically approved
Weman Josefsson, K. (2021). Perspectives of Life in Sweden During the COVID-19 Pandemic. Journal of Clinical Sport Psychology, 15(1), 80-86
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Perspectives of Life in Sweden During the COVID-19 Pandemic
2021 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Sport Psychology, ISSN 1932-9261, E-ISSN 1932-927X, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 80-86Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Sweden has adopted a somewhat different approach to handle the corona pandemic, which has been widely debated both on national and international levels. The Swedish model involves more individual responsibility and reliance on voluntary civic liability than law enforcement, while common measures in other countries are based on more controlling strategies, such as restrictive lockdowns, quarantines, closed borders, and mandatory behavior constraints. This commentary aims to give a brief overview of the foundations of the Swedish model as well as a discussion on how and why it has been adopted in the Swedish society based on Swedish legislations, culture, and traditions. Finally, perspectives on how the Swedish model could be connected to the tenets of self-determination theory will be discussed. © 2021 Human Kinetics, Inc.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics, 2021
Keywords
covid-19, psychology, health behavior, motivation, self-determination
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-45379 (URN)10.1123/jcsp.2020-0055 (DOI)000621195000006 ()2-s2.0-85103135341 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-08-10 Created: 2021-08-10 Last updated: 2023-03-06Bibliographically approved
Chan, D., Zhang, C.-Q. & Weman Josefsson, K. (2021). Why people failed to adhere to COVID-19 preventive behaviors? Perspectives from an integrated behavior change model [Letter to the editor]. Infection control and hospital epidemiology, 42(3), 375-376
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Why people failed to adhere to COVID-19 preventive behaviors? Perspectives from an integrated behavior change model
2021 (English)In: Infection control and hospital epidemiology, ISSN 0899-823X, E-ISSN 1559-6834, Vol. 42, no 3, p. 375-376Article in journal, Letter (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Many preventive behaviors such as the practice of hand, personal, and respiratory hygiene; maintaining social distance (eg, staying home); and cleaning and disinfection are recommended for the prevention of the new coronavirus (COVID-19). However, a growing number of reports have revealed individuals’ violations to these COVID-19 preventive behaviors.1 These violations might endanger the community by increasing the risk of an outbreak of COVID-19. The uptake of and adherence to health behaviors, including behaviors related to the prevention of infectious diseases (eg, COVID-19), are likely highly dependent on individuals’ motivation, intention, and other decision-making factors.2 We aim to apply an integrated behavior change model of health psychology to explain why individuals fail to comply and adhere to these behaviors. © 2020 by The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Cambridge University Press, 2021
Keywords
covid-19, corona, behaviour, prevention, self-determination, theory
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-42095 (URN)10.1017/ice.2020.245 (DOI)000626909300033 ()32408917 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85085498444 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-05-27 Created: 2020-05-27 Last updated: 2021-10-25Bibliographically approved
Teixeira, P. J., Marques, M. M., Silva, M. N., Brunet, J., Duda, J. L., Haerens, L., . . . Hagger, M. S. (2020). Classification of Techniques Used in Self-Determinationheory-Based Interventions in Health Contexts: An Expert Consensus Study. Motivation Science, 6(4), 438-445
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Classification of Techniques Used in Self-Determinationheory-Based Interventions in Health Contexts: An Expert Consensus Study
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2020 (English)In: Motivation Science, ISSN 2333-8113, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 438-445Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

While evidence suggests that interventions based on self-determination theory can be effective in motivating adoption and maintenance of health-related behaviors, and in promoting adaptive psychological outcomes, the motivational techniques that comprise the content of these interventions have not been comprehensively identified or described. The aim of the present study was to develop a classification system of the techniques that comprise self-determination theory interventions, with satisfaction of psychological needs as an organizing principle. Candidate techniques were identified through a comprehensive review of self-determination theory interventions and nomination by experts. The study team developed a preliminary list of candidate techniques accompanied by labels, definitions, and function descriptions of each. Each technique was aligned with the most closely-related psychological need satisfaction construct (autonomy, competence, or relatedness). Using an iterative expert consensus procedure, participating experts (= 18) judged each technique on the preliminary list for redundancy, essentiality, uniqueness, and the proposed link between the technique and basic psychological need. The procedure produced a final classification of 21 motivation and behavior change techniques (MBCTs). Redundancies between final MBCTs against techniques from existing behavior change technique taxonomies were also checked. The classification system is the first formal attempt to systematize self-determination theory intervention techniques. The classification is expected to enhance consistency in descriptions of self-determination theory-based interventions in health contexts, and assist in facilitating synthesis of evidence on interventions based on the theory. The classification is also expected to guide future efforts to identify, describe, and classify the techniques that comprise self-determination theory-based interventions in multiple domains. © 2020, American Psychological Association.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Washington, DC: American Psychological Association (APA), 2020
Keywords
Self-determination theory interventions, Autonomous motivation, Autonomy support, Need satisfaction, Motivational technique
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-41058 (URN)10.1037/mot0000172 (DOI)000613790100012 ()2-s2.0-85088483915 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding: Business Finland (grant # 1801/31/2105) & Marie-Sklodowska-Curie (EDGE) Fellowship programme (grant agreement No. 713567)

Available from: 2019-12-01 Created: 2019-12-01 Last updated: 2024-01-23Bibliographically approved
Rhodes, R. E., Boudreau, P., Weman Josefsson, K. & Ivarsson, A. (2020). Mediators of Physical Activity Behavior Change Interventions Among Adults: A Systematic Review and Metaanalysis. Paper presented at Society of Behavioral Medicine Annual Meeting, San Francisco, California, USA, April 1-4, 2020. Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 54(S1), S100-S100
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mediators of Physical Activity Behavior Change Interventions Among Adults: A Systematic Review and Metaanalysis
2020 (English)In: Annals of Behavioral Medicine, ISSN 0883-6612, E-ISSN 1532-4796, Vol. 54, no S1, p. S100-S100Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 2020
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-52251 (URN)10.1093/abm/kaaa009 (DOI)000546262400206 ()
Conference
Society of Behavioral Medicine Annual Meeting, San Francisco, California, USA, April 1-4, 2020
Note

Meeting Abstract: A290

Available from: 2023-12-15 Created: 2023-12-15 Last updated: 2023-12-15Bibliographically approved
Lindwall, M., Weman Josefsson, K., Stenling, A. & Markland, D. (2019). Approaching a broadened view on behavioral regulation in exercise: A closer look at different facets of introjected regulation using the revised BREQ-4. In: Abstract Book: 7th International Conference on Self-Determination Theory. May 20-24, 2019, The Netherlands. Paper presented at 7th International Conference on Self-Determination Theory, Amsterdam, Netherlands, May 20-24, 2019. , Article ID 12D-096.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Approaching a broadened view on behavioral regulation in exercise: A closer look at different facets of introjected regulation using the revised BREQ-4
2019 (English)In: Abstract Book: 7th International Conference on Self-Determination Theory. May 20-24, 2019, The Netherlands, 2019, article id 12D-096Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Identifying different types of motivation that regulate behavior in an exercise context has been of high interest in exercise psychology science. One of the most widely used instruments for this purpose is the Behavioural Regulation in Exercise Questionnaire-2 (BREQ-2; Markland & Tobin, 2004), which recently has been revised (BREQ-3, Cid et al., 2018) to include also integrated regulation. In previous work, questions have been raised about the nature of introjected regulation, suggesting it can be divided into two different types of regulations, mirroring avoidance and approach.  Therefore, BREQ-3 has been further revised to include items that measure: two facets of introjected regulation (approach and avoidance), resulting in a 28-item instrument (named BREQ-4) measuring seven types of exercise regulation.

The purpose of this paper is to examine: (i) the factorial structure of the new and revised instrument BREQ-4; and (ii) associations between the two newly developed facets of introjected regulation (approach and avoidance), exercise behavior and the other types of regulation in the context of exercise.

Two subsamples, one from the UK consisting of 412 younger (mean age: 21.6 years) adults recruited from various Facebook groups, and one from Sweden, consisting of 369 middle aged (mean age: 40.7) working individuals, also recruited via Facebook, were used. In both samples, data was collected online through Qualtrics. Structural equation modeling was used to examine factorial validity and associations between latent constructs of exercise regulation in BREQ-4 and self-reported exercise behavior.

Confirmatory factor analysis revealed that the 28-item 7-factor model displayed acceptable fit to data in both samples. Configural and metric invariance, but not scalar invariance, between the two samples was established. Avoidance regulation was unrelated to exercise behavior in both samples, whereas approach regulation was weakly and positively associated with exercise in the UK sample. Avoidance and approach was moderately to strongly associated in both samples. In terms of patterns of associations with the other types of regulations, results were similar in both samples: avoidance was more strongly associated with extrinsic regulation whereas approach was more robustly associated with self-determined types of motivation (identified, integrated and intrinsic motivation).  

Keywords
self-determination theory, BREQ-4, introjected regulation, motivation
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-39500 (URN)
Conference
7th International Conference on Self-Determination Theory, Amsterdam, Netherlands, May 20-24, 2019
Available from: 2019-05-27 Created: 2019-05-27 Last updated: 2019-09-04Bibliographically approved
Projects
GoFaR - Digital support systems for sustainable motivation to physical activity and health [2019-00962_Vinnova]; Halmstad University
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-4608-7300

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