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Weman Josefsson, KarinORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-4608-7300
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Publikasjoner (10 av 46) Visa alla publikasjoner
Lindwall, M., Weman Josefsson, K., Stenling, A. & Markland, D. (2019). Approaching a broadened view on behavioral regulation in exercise: A closer look at different facets of introjected regulation using the revised BREQ-4. In: Abstract Book: 7th International Conference on Self-Determination Theory. May 20-24, 2019, The Netherlands. Paper presented at 7th International Conference on Self-Determination Theory, Amsterdam, Netherlands, May 20-24, 2019. , Article ID 12D-096.
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Approaching a broadened view on behavioral regulation in exercise: A closer look at different facets of introjected regulation using the revised BREQ-4
2019 (engelsk)Inngår i: Abstract Book: 7th International Conference on Self-Determination Theory. May 20-24, 2019, The Netherlands, 2019, artikkel-id 12D-096Konferansepaper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Fagfellevurdert)
Abstract [en]

Identifying different types of motivation that regulate behavior in an exercise context has been of high interest in exercise psychology science. One of the most widely used instruments for this purpose is the Behavioural Regulation in Exercise Questionnaire-2 (BREQ-2; Markland & Tobin, 2004), which recently has been revised (BREQ-3, Cid et al., 2018) to include also integrated regulation. In previous work, questions have been raised about the nature of introjected regulation, suggesting it can be divided into two different types of regulations, mirroring avoidance and approach.  Therefore, BREQ-3 has been further revised to include items that measure: two facets of introjected regulation (approach and avoidance), resulting in a 28-item instrument (named BREQ-4) measuring seven types of exercise regulation.

The purpose of this paper is to examine: (i) the factorial structure of the new and revised instrument BREQ-4; and (ii) associations between the two newly developed facets of introjected regulation (approach and avoidance), exercise behavior and the other types of regulation in the context of exercise.

Two subsamples, one from the UK consisting of 412 younger (mean age: 21.6 years) adults recruited from various Facebook groups, and one from Sweden, consisting of 369 middle aged (mean age: 40.7) working individuals, also recruited via Facebook, were used. In both samples, data was collected online through Qualtrics. Structural equation modeling was used to examine factorial validity and associations between latent constructs of exercise regulation in BREQ-4 and self-reported exercise behavior.

Confirmatory factor analysis revealed that the 28-item 7-factor model displayed acceptable fit to data in both samples. Configural and metric invariance, but not scalar invariance, between the two samples was established. Avoidance regulation was unrelated to exercise behavior in both samples, whereas approach regulation was weakly and positively associated with exercise in the UK sample. Avoidance and approach was moderately to strongly associated in both samples. In terms of patterns of associations with the other types of regulations, results were similar in both samples: avoidance was more strongly associated with extrinsic regulation whereas approach was more robustly associated with self-determined types of motivation (identified, integrated and intrinsic motivation).  

Emneord
self-determination theory, BREQ-4, introjected regulation, motivation
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-39500 (URN)
Konferanse
7th International Conference on Self-Determination Theory, Amsterdam, Netherlands, May 20-24, 2019
Tilgjengelig fra: 2019-05-27 Laget: 2019-05-27 Sist oppdatert: 2019-09-04bibliografisk kontrollert
Weman Josefsson, K. (2019). The value of motivational theory in education. In: The IAFOR Conference series 2019: Independence & Interdependence, Programme & Abstract Book. Paper presented at The IAFOR Conference series 2019 – Independence & Interdependence, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA, January 3-5, 2019 (pp. 58-58).
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>The value of motivational theory in education
2019 (engelsk)Inngår i: The IAFOR Conference series 2019: Independence & Interdependence, Programme & Abstract Book, 2019, s. 58-58Konferansepaper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Fagfellevurdert)
Abstract [en]

Motivation is the driving force behind all behaviors, from posting cat pictures on Facebook to finishing an exam on time - and motivation determines how much, how often and how passionately we do it. Besides providing expertise and knowledge, teachers can create good opportunities for commitment, learning and development among their learners – or the opposite – by influencing the motivational climate.  Self-determination theory (SDT) describes how teachers’ communication style can affect motivation, which in turn affects learning, achievement, development and commitment among learners. SDT also provides reliable methods based on the significance of basic psychological needs considered essential for motivation and self-regulation in all humans; autonomy, competence and relatedness. The need for autonomy involves volition and self-determination, the need for competence is about feeling effective and capable, and the need for relatedness is about feeling affiliated to other people. Social contexts that satisfy these needs nourish personal involvement, sustainable motivation and wellbeing. When the needs contrarily are thwarted, e.g. by using punishments, force or guilt, learners will feel controlled, incapable and excluded, which is related to cheating, nonattendance and boredom. To inspire interest and dedication teachers could therefore benefit from applying SDT in the classroom to stimulate a favorable motivational environment where learners have the opportunity to grow and thrive, not only within the specific subject, but also as a person. Such a social climate will also loop back and influence the teacher’s own experience, basic need satisfaction and motivation; constituting the dependence and interdependence of classroom dynamics. 

HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-39296 (URN)
Konferanse
The IAFOR Conference series 2019 – Independence & Interdependence, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA, January 3-5, 2019
Tilgjengelig fra: 2019-04-30 Laget: 2019-04-30 Sist oppdatert: 2019-05-09bibliografisk kontrollert
Weman Josefsson, K. & Back, J. (2019). The value of motivational theory to influence active transport behaviors – a Swedish example. In: The IAFOR Conference series 2019: Independence & Interdependence, Programme & Abstract Book. Paper presented at The IAFOR Conference series 2019 – Independence & Interdependence, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA, January 3-5, 2019 (pp. 107-107).
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>The value of motivational theory to influence active transport behaviors – a Swedish example
2019 (engelsk)Inngår i: The IAFOR Conference series 2019: Independence & Interdependence, Programme & Abstract Book, 2019, s. 107-107Konferansepaper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Fagfellevurdert)
Abstract [en]

Cycle commuting have been shown to promote major health effects, studies showing as much as 41% lower overall mortality compared to car or collective transport (Celis-Morales et al 2017). Yet, for many of us, there are significant behavioral barriers in changing our transport behavior. On the positive note, studies have shown that bikes providing electric assistance when pedaling (pedelecs) also have positive effects on cardiovascular health and helps people meet physical activity recommendations. It is possible that pedelecs could facilitate active transport by reducing some perceived behavioral barriers by enhancing autonomous motivation in line with self-determination theory (SDT).   The overall purpose was to examine underlying motives for using the pedelec above passive transport (car, bus). Semi-structured interviews (N=14) were used to study motivational aspects of participation in a community based pedelec project. Qualitative content analysis revealed that motives to choose the pedelec was health reasons (regular exercise), economic reasons (e.g. avoid having two cars), environmental reasons (to reduce environmental impact) and personal values (e.g. related to exercise identity).   These four motivational themes can be related to the tenets of SDT and the significance of autonomous motivation for behavioral regulation. The step from passive to active transport might be challenging, but facilitating use of pedelecs and appropriate communication policy might facilitate such a transition. Application of SDT and addressing the motivational themes found in this study could shed some light on motivational drives for active transport and inform community interventions and policies design to adopt sustainable transport behaviors.

HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-39295 (URN)
Konferanse
The IAFOR Conference series 2019 – Independence & Interdependence, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA, January 3-5, 2019
Tilgjengelig fra: 2019-04-30 Laget: 2019-04-30 Sist oppdatert: 2019-05-09bibliografisk kontrollert
Weman Josefsson, K. & Back, J. (2018). Motivational perspectives of a community based electric bike project in Sweden. In: Abstract book for the ISBNPA 2018 Annual Meeting in Hong Kong: . Paper presented at Advancing Behaviour Change Science, Hongkong, China, June 3-6, 2018 (pp. 134-135).
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Motivational perspectives of a community based electric bike project in Sweden
2018 (engelsk)Inngår i: Abstract book for the ISBNPA 2018 Annual Meeting in Hong Kong, 2018, s. 134-135Konferansepaper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Fagfellevurdert)
Abstract [en]

Objective

A community in Sweden runs a project aiming to stimulate citizens to choose active transport to reduce city car traffic, emissions and noise; and to promote residents' health by increased physical activity. Citizens can borrow an electric bike providing electric assistance when pedaling (pedelec) for free for three months to “try and feel”, and are then offered to buy the bike after this period to a reduced price. The project has engaged approximately 500 participants over three years (2015-2017) distributed in three groups per year. Drawing from self-determination theory, the purpose of this study was to examine underlying motives for choosing to use the pedelec above passive transport (car, bus) during and after the three month period.  

 Methods

Semi-structured interviews were performed with eight informants who had participated in the project during 2014-2016. These will be complemented with another 8-10 interviews from the 2017 participant groups. Qualitative content analysis was used to explore and describe attitudes, behaviors, goals and barriers regarding informants’ motives to physical activity in general, as well as specifically directed towards using pedelecs. The interviews were complemented with quantitative measures in two of the groups from 2017 before, during and after participation (N=19).

 Results

Analyses revealed four main themes of motivation. The informants chose the pedelec as a means of transport for health reasons (regular exercise), for economic reasons (avoid having two cars, reducing gasoline and parking costs), for environmental reasons (to reduce environmental impact) and for personal values (related to exercise identity and/or environmental-friendly). Those who used the pedelec regularly felt that their fitness improved and that they had more energy in everyday life. Participants also felt that the pedelec facilitated cycling to a larger extent, and in addition to using it for transport for work or school, they also used it for shopping and leisure activities.

 Conclusions

The step from passive to active transport might be challenging, but a pedelec might facilitate such a transition and reduce perceived behavioral barriers. This study could shed some light on how community interventions can be designed to facilitate autonomous motivation towards more sustainable transport behaviors.

Emneord
self-determination, motivation, physical activity, electric bike
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-37065 (URN)978-1-7324011-0-5 (ISBN)
Konferanse
Advancing Behaviour Change Science, Hongkong, China, June 3-6, 2018
Tilgjengelig fra: 2018-06-14 Laget: 2018-06-14 Sist oppdatert: 2018-07-02bibliografisk kontrollert
Weman Josefsson, K., Johnson, U. & Lindwall, M. (2018). Short report: moderations in exercise motivation – gender and age moderates the relations of motivation quality and exercise behavior. Health Psychology and Behavioral Medicine, 6(1), 93-103
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Short report: moderations in exercise motivation – gender and age moderates the relations of motivation quality and exercise behavior
2018 (engelsk)Inngår i: Health Psychology and Behavioral Medicine, E-ISSN 2164-2850, Vol. 6, nr 1, s. 93-103Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims: Self-determined motivation has been found to be an important predictor of exercise behavior. Findings on gender and age differences are however mixed and previous research has called for studies to examine gender and age as potential moderating factors as they might influence how motivation quality affects exercise behavior.

Methods: Embedded in a controlled trial of a digital intervention aiming to promote exercise motivation, this study examined specific (longitudinal) pathways related to motivation quality, psychological need satisfaction and exercise behavior within the self-determination theory (SDT) process model in a sample of 318 adult employees. The participants completed web-based versions of Basic Psychological Needs in Exercise Scale, Behavioural Regulations in Exercise Questionnaire-2, and Leisure Time Exercise Questionnaire three times during a six weeks period.

Results: Moderation analyses revealed significant gender and age differences in the associations of motivation quality, basic psychological needs and exercise behavior over time. Several paths in the SDT-process model, linking psychological needs and motivation quality to exercise behavior, were moderated by gender and age. The stipulated mechanisms between exercise, motivation and psychological need satisfaction in the SDT-processmodel revealed to be stronger for women than for men, and stronger for older adults than for younger and middle-aged adults. The effect of amotivation on exercise was also significantly moderated by age in the full sample, by positively predicting light exercise for younger adults.

Conclusions: Future recommendations are related to the examination of potential differences in opportunities of autonomy support in the social context based on factors such as gender and age, and also to further examine these factors as potential moderators instead of statistically controlling them as default.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
Abingdon: Taylor & Francis, 2018
Emneord
motivation, self-determination, gender, age, moderation
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-38227 (URN)10.1080/21642850.2018.1462706 (DOI)
Tilgjengelig fra: 2018-10-26 Laget: 2018-10-26 Sist oppdatert: 2018-10-26bibliografisk kontrollert
Weman Josefsson, K., Johnson, U. & Lindwall, M. (2018). Zooming in on the Effects: a Controlled Trial on Motivation and Exercise Behaviour in a Digital Context. Current psychology (New Brunswick, N.J.), 37(1), 250-262
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Zooming in on the Effects: a Controlled Trial on Motivation and Exercise Behaviour in a Digital Context
2018 (engelsk)Inngår i: Current psychology (New Brunswick, N.J.), ISSN 1046-1310, E-ISSN 1936-4733, Vol. 37, nr 1, s. 250-262Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Abstract [en]

This study is a description of a short-term digital exercise intervention based on the theoretical framework self-determination theory and tested in a controlled trial. The sample consisted of 318 adult women (n = 279) and men (n = 40) aged 23–67 years (M = 46.7; SD = 9.4) participating in a digital step contest provided by their employer. All participants completed study baseline measures via validated web-based versions of the following instruments: Basic Psychological Needs in Exercise Scale, Behavioural Regulations in Exercise Questionnaire-2, and Leisure Time Exercise Questionnaire. These measures were repeated twice, 3 weeks (post-intervention) and 6 weeks (follow-up) after study baseline. The experimental group had access to the intervention platform for three weeks. Data were analysed by analyses of covariance and mediation variable analysis. Results showed the intervention to affect exercise level and intensity as well as basic psychological need satisfaction and behavioural regulations. Intervention effects on amotivation post-intervention were found to mediate total exercise behaviour at follow-up. Moderation analyses showed intervention effects on light exercise to be stronger for those participants engaging in moderate or high levels of light activities at study baseline. Also, the effect on identified regulation was stronger for those with low levels of identified regulation at study baseline. This study adds to the knowledge on exercise motivation based on short-term intervention effects on level and intensity of exercise and physical activity. The use of mediating and moderating analyses uncover processes underlying the main intervention effects. Findings are discussed in relation to self-determination theory and previous research. © 2016 Springer Science+Business Media New York

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
New York: Springer-Verlag New York, 2018
Emneord
Exercise Intervention Mediation Moderation Self-determination
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-32123 (URN)10.1007/s12144-016-9508-1 (DOI)2-s2.0-84988942781 (Scopus ID)
Forskningsfinansiär
Knowledge Foundation
Merknad

Funded by Halmstad University, University of Gothenburg and the Swedish KK-foundation.

Tilgjengelig fra: 2016-10-02 Laget: 2016-10-02 Sist oppdatert: 2018-07-05bibliografisk kontrollert
Weman Josefsson, K., Ivarsson, A., Johnson, U. & Lindwall, M. (2017). Effects of a digital intervention program on motivational regulation patterns in an exercise context: A latent transition analysis of the “motivational soup”. In: Gangyan, S., Cruz, J. & Jaenes, J.C. (Ed.), Sport Psychology: Linking theory to practice: Proceedings of the XIV ISSP World Congress of Sport Psychology. Paper presented at ISSP 14th World Congress of Sport Psychology, Sevilla, Spain, 2017, July 10-14, 2017 (pp. 319-320). Sevilla: International Society of Sport Psychology
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Effects of a digital intervention program on motivational regulation patterns in an exercise context: A latent transition analysis of the “motivational soup”
2017 (engelsk)Inngår i: Sport Psychology: Linking theory to practice: Proceedings of the XIV ISSP World Congress of Sport Psychology / [ed] Gangyan, S., Cruz, J. & Jaenes, J.C., Sevilla: International Society of Sport Psychology , 2017, s. 319-320Konferansepaper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Fagfellevurdert)
Abstract [en]

Within the self-determination theory of motivation the concept “motivational soup” refers to motivational regulations forming profiles of accumulated drives towards behavior. Few studies have examined the probability of intervention effects to change such motivational profiles over time, knowledge that might inform future program design to promote sustainable exercise motivation. Participants (N=318) were 279 women and 40 men, aged 23-67 years (Mage=46.7; SD=9.4) consisting of adult members of a web-based step contest provided by their employers. Of the 166 individuals randomly assigned to the experimental group, 85 logged in to the digital intervention platform at least once and were considered treated as intended. This group had access to a web-based digital exercise motivation intervention based on SDT for three weeks. The trial had three measure points; T1 baseline, T2 (3 weeks) and a follow up T3 (6 weeks). To investigate the potential effect of the intervention on the odds of participants to change motivational profiles between T1 and T3 we used Latent Transition Analysis. The intervention had positive main effects on exercise level. A four profile solution showed good quality of classification into the separate profiles (entropy = .92). The profiles were labeled high-high (n=262), high-low (n=26), low-high (n=8), and low-low (n=12), where the label high reflected a more autonomous regulation pattern (missing n=10). Participants in the autonomous profile at T1 had high probabilities of remaining there at T3, but slightly lower probability in the control (82%) than the intervention (95%) condition. Participants in the control condition also had a statistically significant increased probability to belong to the profile with a decreased level autonomy T3 (high-low profile) (OR=4.0, p=.008).These results indicate that this digital exercise motivation intervention can increase the likelihood for participants to sustain autonomous motivation profiles over time.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
Sevilla: International Society of Sport Psychology, 2017
Emneord
motivational soup, latent transition analysis, exercise, self-determination, motivational profiles, intervention
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-34970 (URN)978-84-9148-282-6 (ISBN)
Konferanse
ISSP 14th World Congress of Sport Psychology, Sevilla, Spain, 2017, July 10-14, 2017
Forskningsfinansiär
Knowledge Foundation
Tilgjengelig fra: 2017-09-15 Laget: 2017-09-15 Sist oppdatert: 2018-07-05bibliografisk kontrollert
Weman Josefsson, K., Fröberg, K., Karlsson, S. & Lindwall, M. (2017). Mechanisms in Self-Determined Exercise Motivation: Effects of a Theory Informed Pilot Intervention. Current psychology (New Brunswick, N.J.), 36(1), 90-100
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Mechanisms in Self-Determined Exercise Motivation: Effects of a Theory Informed Pilot Intervention
2017 (engelsk)Inngår i: Current psychology (New Brunswick, N.J.), ISSN 1046-1310, E-ISSN 1936-4733, Vol. 36, nr 1, s. 90-100Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Abstract [en]

The purpose was to examine the effects of an exercise pilot intervention informed by Self-determination theory. The 64 participants were randomized into experimental and control group. The main questions were whether the intervention would influence (a) exercise level, (b) motivation quality, and (c) autonomy and competence need satisfaction. We also examined the indirect effects of self-determined motivation on exercise. Significant intervention effects were found regarding exercise level and motivation quality. Also, intervention effect on exercise was found to be mediated by motivation quality and identified regulation. The results provide interesting information about the underlying mechanisms involved in exercise behaviour change. © Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
New York, NY: Springer, 2017
Emneord
Exercise, Intervention, Motivation, Self-determination
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-29677 (URN)10.1007/s12144-015-9388-9 (DOI)000395448500010 ()2-s2.0-84944929511 (Scopus ID)
Merknad

This research was financially supported by the Centre for person-centred care at Gothenburg University and by Halmstad University.

Tilgjengelig fra: 2015-10-26 Laget: 2015-10-26 Sist oppdatert: 2018-03-22bibliografisk kontrollert
Weman Josefsson, K., Johnson, U. & Lindwall, M. (2017). Moderating effects of gender and age within the mechanisms of the self-determination theory process model: Examining exercise motivation in a digital context. Paper presented at North American Society for the Psychology of Sport and Physical Activity (NASPSPA) Annual Conference, San Diego, California, USA, June 5-8, 2017. Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology (JSEP), 39(Suppl. 1), 330-330
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Moderating effects of gender and age within the mechanisms of the self-determination theory process model: Examining exercise motivation in a digital context
2017 (engelsk)Inngår i: Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology (JSEP), ISSN 0895-2779, E-ISSN 1543-2904, Vol. 39, nr Suppl. 1, s. 330-330Artikkel i tidsskrift, Meeting abstract (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Abstract [en]

Exercise-related goals and values are likely to differ between people based on factors such as gender, age and culture, and there are reasons to believe that the mechanisms between motivation and exercise behavior presented in the self-determination theory (SDT) process model also could vary as a function of such influences.

This study is part of a digital exercise intervention (see Weman-Josefsson et al., 2016) in a sample of 318 adult women (n = 278) and men (n = 40) aged 23-67 years (M = 46.7; SD = 9.4) joining a digital work-site based step contest. Behavioral regulations, psychological need satisfaction and exercise behavior was measured using a three wave web based questionnaire (T1 = baseline; T2 = post-intervention, week 3; and T3 = follow up, week 6). Moderation analyses were done in the SPSS macro PROCESS using a bootstrapping resampling approach.

The moderation analyses showed gender and age differences in the relations of behavioral regulations, psychological need satisfaction and exercise behavior within the SDT process model. Controlled motivation was for example a significant positive predictor for exercise in men showing external regulation at T2 to moderate the relation between psychological need satisfaction and exercise in men (beta = 11.29, p < .01) at T3 in appositive direction, while this path was negative and non-significant for women. Also Intrinsic regulation at T2 positively predicted relatedness need satisfaction for women at the same time-point (beta = 0.47, p < .05), but this path was negative and non-significant for men. In terms of age differences, the negative association between external regulation at T2 and strenuous exercise at T3 was stronger and significant for older adults compared to middle-aged adults (beta = -8.90, p < .01) and was positive (but non-significant) for younger adults.

We found gender and age to moderate several paths of the self-determination process model, suggesting more comprehensive analyses of potential moderators in exercise behavior to be an interesting avenue for future studies. 

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics, 2017
Emneord
exercise, moderation, gender, age, self-determination, motivation
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-36032 (URN)
Konferanse
North American Society for the Psychology of Sport and Physical Activity (NASPSPA) Annual Conference, San Diego, California, USA, June 5-8, 2017
Merknad

Poster

Tilgjengelig fra: 2018-01-04 Laget: 2018-01-04 Sist oppdatert: 2018-07-05bibliografisk kontrollert
Weman Josefsson, K. (2017). Motivational profiles in exercise and physical activity behavior. In: Gangyan, S., Cruz, J. & Jaenes, J.C. (Ed.), Sport Psychology: Linking theory to practice: Proceedings of the XIV ISSP World Congress of Sport Psychology. Paper presented at ISSP 14th World Congress of Sport Psychology, Sevilla, Spain, July 10-14, 2017 (pp. 318-318). Sevilla: International Society of Sport Psychology
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Motivational profiles in exercise and physical activity behavior
2017 (engelsk)Inngår i: Sport Psychology: Linking theory to practice: Proceedings of the XIV ISSP World Congress of Sport Psychology / [ed] Gangyan, S., Cruz, J. & Jaenes, J.C., Sevilla: International Society of Sport Psychology , 2017, s. 318-318Konferansepaper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Fagfellevurdert)
Abstract [en]

From a self-determination theory (SDT; Deci & Ryan 1985; Ryan & Deci, 2002) perspective, the nature of motivation is dynamic and the quite recent concept of “motivational soup” suggest that different types of motivational regulations coexist within people and that these within-person patterns in turn will produce different patterns of behavior. Instead of using traditional approaches focusing on variable centered analyses and between-person patterns, the relatively new trend (within this area) of using person-centered statistical analyses permit insights and understanding in how motivational regulations interact within persons and how these interactions relate to behavior. Such knowledge would provide a valuable contribution to the tailoring of interventions aimed to target specific groups of people using potent psychographic profiles as moderators instead of more blunted demographic variables (Hardcastle & Hagger, 2015). This symposium brings together European researchers from four different universities to discuss new insights on within-person relationships in different steps of the SDT process model. The first presenter will look into the associations between behavioral regulation profiles and exercisers’ emotional response in a large sample of health clubs members. The second presenter will discuss exercise motivational profiles of obese patients and how these relate to exercise behavior 6-months post-discharge. The third presenter will describe a model with four motivation profiles for exercise professionals in relationship to multiple continuous outcomes such as work satisfaction, emotional exhaustion and depersonalization. The fourth presenter will share results from a latent transition analysis on a three-wave longitudinal study in a digital context. The following discussion will then be focused on overlapping and specific motivational profiles in relation to exercise and physical activity promotion and strategies for future research and applications.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
Sevilla: International Society of Sport Psychology, 2017
Emneord
exercise, motivational profiles, self-determination
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-34968 (URN)978-84-9148-282-6 (ISBN)
Konferanse
ISSP 14th World Congress of Sport Psychology, Sevilla, Spain, July 10-14, 2017
Forskningsfinansiär
Knowledge Foundation
Tilgjengelig fra: 2017-09-15 Laget: 2017-09-15 Sist oppdatert: 2017-10-19bibliografisk kontrollert
Organisasjoner
Identifikatorer
ORCID-id: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-4608-7300